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What is the proper/traditional way to be enrolled in the Brown Scapular?
Get a Scapular and find a Traditional Priest. He'll use the Investiture Rite in the Rituale Romanum.
Several years ago I was given a brown scapular.  I don't recall who gave it to me.  However, about a year ago I started wearing it daily.  I was not aware of the enrollment or blessing of the scapular, and I have no way of knowing if whomever gave it to me had it blessed beforehand.  Does this mean I've been doing it wrong?
(12-04-2017, 01:35 PM)Bonaventure Wrote: [ -> ]Several years ago I was given a brown scapular.  I don't recall who gave it to me.  However, about a year ago I started wearing it daily.  I was not aware of the enrollment or blessing of the scapular, and I have no way of knowing if whomever gave it to me had it blessed beforehand.  Does this mean I've been doing it wrong?

Not really, tho' I highly recommend formal enrolment. From the Scapular Catechesis, approved by both the Order of Carmel, and the Discalced Order (my emphasis),


 
What is the relationship of the Carmelite Order to the Brown Scapular?

The Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel is the habit of the Carmelite Order. For the religious members of the Order it takes the form of two long, undecorated panels of brown cloth joined at the shoulders and falling, one to the front and one to the back. For the laity it takes the form of a two smaller pieces of brown or dark cloth, preferably plain, joined over the shoulder by ribbons, and falling, one to the back, the other to the front. As the Order's habit, the scapular signifies some degree of affiliation to the Carmelites.

Six practical ways of affiliation are recognized by the Carmelite Order:

  1. the religious men and women of the Order and aggregated institutes
  2. the Secular/Lay Order (Third Order)
  3. members of public associations and confraternities of Our Lady of Mount Carmel, such as active communities of the Scapular Confraternity.
  4. Those who have been invested in the scapular, practice the Order's spirituality, and have been granted some association with the Order.
  5. Those who wear the scapular out of devotion, practice the Order's spirituality, but who have no formal association to the Order.
  6. Those who are committed to practice the Marian characteristics of Carmelite Spirituality but use outward forms other than the Brown Scapular to express this devotion.

The Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel is the common habit of all branches of the Carmelite Family and a sign of unity of that family. For that reason the Scapular Confraternity and similar associations of the faithful centering around this sacramental belong not to any one branch of Carmel but to the entire Carmelite family. Thus, there is only one common public association of the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel.
If a person wears the scapular, but has no formal association to the Order, does that person still gain the benefits associated with the scapular?

A person who wears the scapular and practices the spirituality of the Carmelite Order has an affiliation, loose as it may be, to the Carmelite family and so shares in the graces traditionally associated with the Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. However, simply to wear the scapular without accepting the responsibilities attached to it would be to reduce this precious sacramental to the status of a charm or good-luck piece.
What is this Carmelite spirituality that one must practice in order to have an affiliation with the Carmelite Order?

The spirituality of the Carmelite Order is one of the preeminent spiritual traditions of the Catholic Church. It is difficult to reduce this spirituality to a few sentences. One who wears the scapular should certainly reflect upon the teachings of the great Carmelite saints, three of whom are doctors of the Church.

A few basic introductory principles of Carmelite spirituality would be

  1. frequent participation in the Mass and reception of Holy Communion;
  2. frequent reading of and meditation on the Word of God in Sacred Scripture;
  3. the regular praying of at least part of the Liturgy of the Hours;
  4. imitation of and devotion to Mary, the woman of faith who hears the Word of God and puts it into practice;
  5. the practice of the virtues, notably charity, chastity (according to one's state of life), and obedience to the will of God.
(12-04-2017, 01:35 PM)Bonaventure Wrote: [ -> ]Several years ago I was given a brown scapular.  I don't recall who gave it to me.  However, about a year ago I started wearing it daily.  I was not aware of the enrollment or blessing of the scapular, and I have no way of knowing if whomever gave it to me had it blessed beforehand.  Does this mean I've been doing it wrong?

In order to receive the proper benefits attached to the scapular, you have to be enrolled. The scapular is merely a sign of having been enrolled in the Scapular Confraternity. While wearing one (or the scapular medal) is a requirement of receiving the benefits, wearing one does not make one a member of this confraternity.

A scapular cannot be blessed as a scapular apart from the investiture. There is no specific rite for the blessing of a scapular and a priest cannot divide up parts of the ritual or make up his own formula. Thus the first scapular is blessed, and all subsequent ones are (like clerical garments) not blessed. 

Thus you did not receive a properly blessed scapular, nor are you enrolled in the Scapular Confraternity.

Any priest can enroll you in the Confraternity using the proper ritual and investing you properly with the scapular. 

The two conditions for the spiritual benefits are the wearing of the scapular and the recitation of the Little Office of Our Lady every day. You can substitute a 5-decade Rosary for the Little Office.
(12-04-2017, 02:24 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]In order to receive the proper benefits attached to the scapular, you have to be enrolled. The scapular is merely a sign of having been enrolled in the Scapular Confraternity. While wearing one (or the scapular medal) is a requirement of receiving the benefits, wearing one does not make one a member of this confraternity.
You know, MM, I almost always agree with your posts, as evidenced by the number of likes I have given you, but here I have a bone to pick with you.

As the official Scapular Catechism I linked to below says,

Quote:If a person wears the scapular, but has no formal association to the Order, does that person still gain the benefits associated with the scapular?

A person who wears the scapular and practices the spirituality of the Carmelite Order has an affiliation, loose as it may be, to the Carmelite family and so shares in the graces traditionally associated with the Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. However, simply to wear the scapular without accepting the responsibilities attached to it would be to reduce this precious sacramental to the status of a charm or good-luck piece.
Since being enrolled in the Scapular Confraternity constitutes a 'formal association' with the Order, it is obvious that enrolment is not, absolutely, required.  This is not a matter of Traditionalism vs the 'NO Church', since it is in the power of the First Order(s), with the approval of Rome, to set the conditions for one's sharing in the spiritual goods of the Orders(s).
(12-05-2017, 09:22 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-04-2017, 02:24 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]In order to receive the proper benefits attached to the scapular, you have to be enrolled. The scapular is merely a sign of having been enrolled in the Scapular Confraternity. While wearing one (or the scapular medal) is a requirement of receiving the benefits, wearing one does not make one a member of this confraternity.
You know, MM, I almost always agree with your posts, as evidenced by the number of likes I have given you, but here I have a bone to pick with you.

As the official Scapular Catechism I linked to below says,

Quote:If a person wears the scapular, but has no formal association to the Order, does that person still gain the benefits associated with the scapular?

A person who wears the scapular and practices the spirituality of the Carmelite Order has an affiliation, loose as it may be, to the Carmelite family and so shares in the graces traditionally associated with the Brown Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel. However, simply to wear the scapular without accepting the responsibilities attached to it would be to reduce this precious sacramental to the status of a charm or good-luck piece.
Since being enrolled in the Scapular Confraternity constitutes a 'formal association' with the Order, it is obvious that enrolment is not, absolutely, required.  This is not a matter of Traditionalism vs the 'NO Church', since it is in the power of the First Order(s), with the approval of Rome, to set the conditions for one's sharing in the spiritual goods of the Orders(s).

I stand corrected.

I wasn't trying to, nor would make some NO vs Trad distinction here.

I would point out only the warning posted here, which, sadly, I think is how most traddies approach the scapular—as a good-luck charm, or nearly so. They expect the promises, but often do not practice the spirituality or duties associated.

Many a time I have met someone who thought that wearing a scapular along was a guarantee of heaven, no matter what their moral life or spiritual life looked like. The refused to remove it even to shower since, if they took it off and died without it, being in the state of sin they would go to hell.

I would tend to suggest that while it's one thing to hand out a Rosary to someone who is not Catholic or not practicing, the scapular should only be given to those who are willing to at least try to pray a daily Rosary, and who understand it is not a good-luck charm.
(12-06-2017, 03:13 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]I stand corrected.

I wasn't trying to, nor would make some NO vs Trad distinction here.

I would point out only the warning posted here, which, sadly, I think is how most traddies approach the scapular—as a good-luck charm, or nearly so. They expect the promises, but often do not practice the spirituality or duties associated.

Many a time I have met someone who thought that wearing a scapular along was a guarantee of heaven, no matter what their moral life or spiritual life looked like. The refused to remove it even to shower since, if they took it off and died without it, being in the state of sin they would go to hell.

I would tend to suggest that while it's one thing to hand out a Rosary to someone who is not Catholic or not practicing, the scapular should only be given to those who are willing to at least try to pray a daily Rosary, and who understand it is not a good-luck charm.
MM, no harm, no foul. I totally agree with you. Ofttimes the Scapular is seen as a magic 'get out of purgatory free' charm. In fact, the Catechesis I quoted from also contains this:

Quote:What is the official status of the Sabbatine Privilege?

Historical research has shown that the alleged fourteenth-century appearance of the Blessed Mother to Pope John XXII is without historical foundation. As a matter of fact, in the year 1613 the Holy See determined that the decree establishing the"Sabbatine Privilege" was unfounded and the Church admonished the Carmelite Order not to preach this doctrine. Unfortunately, the Order did not always comply with this directive of the Holy See.
 
At the time the Carmelites were instructed to stop mentioning the"Sabbatine Privilege" the Holy See acknowledged that the faithful may devoutly believe that the Blessed Virgin Mary by her continuous intercession, merciful prayers, merits, and special protection will assist the souls of deceased brothers and sisters and members of the confraternity, especially on Saturday, the day which the church dedicates to the Blessed Virgin.
 
Consistent with the Catholic tradition, such favors associated with the wearing of the Brown Scapular would be meaningless without the wearers living and dying in the state of grace, observing chastity according to their state in life, and living a life of prayer and penitence. The promises traditionally tied to the scapular offer us what the Second Vatican Council says about the role of the Blessed Virgin Mary: "By her maternal love, Mary cares for the brothers and sisters of her Son, who still make their earthly journey surrounded by dangers and difficulties, until they are led to their happy fatherland."
So, it is important to remember that whilst the Scapular is a powerful sacramental, there is nothing 'magic' about it, and one must fulfil the conditions in order to benefit from it.
(12-06-2017, 03:13 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]I stand corrected.

I wasn't trying to, nor would make some NO vs Trad distinction here.

I would point out only the warning posted here, which, sadly, I think is how most traddies approach the scapular—as a good-luck charm, or nearly so. They expect the promises, but often do not practice the spirituality or duties associated.

Many a time I have met someone who thought that wearing a scapular along was a guarantee of heaven, no matter what their moral life or spiritual life looked like. The refused to remove it even to shower since, if they took it off and died without it, being in the state of sin they would go to hell.

I would tend to suggest that while it's one thing to hand out a Rosary to someone who is not Catholic or not practicing, the scapular should only be given to those who are willing to at least try to pray a daily Rosary, and who understand it is not a good-luck charm.

Even though I've had a scapular for many years, I didn't start wearing it until relatively recently, and coincidentally, at a time when I began saying the Rosary daily (or at least try to).  I have met others, though, that do seem to think that it has to be worn 24/7, and never take it off, not only the shower/bath but even for swimming.  I don't follow that, nor do I believe it to be some good-luck charm.  

If I recall correctly, shortly after one of the Fatima visions, one of the children was asked about the Rosary and the scapular, and whether they must both be followed.  The child's response was that the Rosary and scapular were one in the same.
(12-06-2017, 05:10 PM)Bonaventure Wrote: [ -> ]I have met others, though, that do seem to think that it has to be worn 24/7, and never take it off, not only the shower/bath but even for swimming.  I don't follow that, nor do I believe it to be some good-luck charm.  
Traditionally, it was worn 24/7, tho' I think the shower/bath bit is probably a little excessive. Tho', TBH, since I also wear the Scapular Medal (blessed for all five Scapulars I'm enrolled in), I suppose I'm covered even there. I do wear it whilst swimming, but I also always wear a tee shirt  when I'm disporting myself in the pool or lake.
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