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Good article here and very important information discussed as well. I have been a student of the Demonic/Occult, as ammunition for battle, not as study to be a participant. I have come upon people who have been oppressed and obsessed by evil spirit and have brought (some of) them to the proper sources for deliverance. It is a very moving experience, but also quite difficult to accomplish getting that person there. Prayer is often most effective, though.

The video is EXCELLENT! Watch it to the end, because the information in the answers given to the people asking questions is vital. Some very good books on meditation are referenced, for instance. The viseo is a little long, but I assure you, it is well worth your time to listen to this very well done talk.

St. Michael The Archangel, defend us in battle...



Quote:Link to Original Article


Video: Exorcist On Deliverance
December 5, 2017 by sd
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Pretty valuable stuff.

That is, the insights of an exorcist, Father Chad Ripperger, author of Deliverance Prayers: For Use By the Laity.

We spoke to him the other day, as his book flies off the shelves (give due time for delivery), and learned a few things from this traditionalist Roman Catholic priest, from Denver, who founded a community of exorcistic religious and believes that the Catholic Church in the U.S. has “dropped the ball” when it comes to spiritual warfare.

Among other things, Father Ripperger, ordained in Tulsa twenty years ago, says in the course of conducting sixty full-blown exorcisms, he’s learned that demons particularly hate the Scapular — seeking, during those expulsions, to rip it off the victim.

“The Scapular is very important
because it provides a level of protection,” emphasizes Father Ripperger, who celebrates Mass in the Latin rite. “In one case of possession that I had, the demon was a demon of impurity and every time he would manifest, the first thing he would do is try to get the Scapular the woman was wearing off.”

[Image: fr-ripperger.jpg]Father Ripperger, who was born in Wyoming, now works exclusively as an exorcist in a community, the Dolorans, that prays three to four hours a day — prayer being so crucial when one ventures into the domain of deliverance (as is fasting). We know Jesus told His disciples that one particularly stubborn demon could  only be  cast out by prayer and fasting (Mark 9:29 in the correct translations).

In addition to the Scapular, other valuable sacramentals: Holy Water (of course), Blessed Salt (because, when properly blessed, it is exorcised), and the Miraculous Medal (because it induces purity).

Like other exorcists, Father Ripperger cites sexual impurity and occult contamination as the main ways people get in trouble — New Age, Ouija board, witchcraft, and at the extreme, sad end, satanism. But also things we don’t usually relate to demonism, such as tattoos, which, in some cases, he says, can be a demon “branding” a person (even “religious” ones, because it is “mutilation”) and attaching itself to the insignia. “There are tattoos that can open up the door,” warns the priest.

It’s something we need to hear more about from the pulpits.

Father Ripperger is not necessarily welcomed by some modernistic dioceses — among other reasons, because his group, while strictly obedient to Rome (he warns about criticizing the Pope), is dedicated to Latin. [Image: ripperger_pipe.jpg]He entered the field when, as a young priest, he was asked to pray over someone who, just a third way through the first prayer, manifested a demon.


The paranormal phenomena he has witnessed?

“I’ve seen everything you’ve seen out of Hollywood,
but that’s the most extraordinary thing you’ll see,” he told Spirit Daily. During one exorcism the subject levitated, rising off the floor about twelve inches. In other cases, there is “facial morphing” — features changing. “The most common thing you’ll see face change to that of a rat, long of face.”

“The occult is the most effective if you want to be obsessed, and any kind of mortal sin can cause obsessions and oppressions,” he says. “A grave disorder like rape or assault can also impart spirits [to the victim].”

God, he notes,
looks to draw a “greater good” from what otherwise seems so unfair. There can be cases whereby a spirit haunts a child born in the womb of a mother who had a prior abortion, he says, for our discernment.

He urges Catholics to get their angels more involved in their lives.

Every demon has a specific nemesis. The Immaculate Conception, for example, is extremely effective against satanism. Various saints battle various demons. Surely, Guadalupe can be invoked — for it is through this apparition that Mary defeated much Aztec blood sacrifice. The priest has been finding Saint John Paul II particularly effective during exorcisms. The Denver exorcist says that simply keeping to a strict sacramental life goes a long way toward ensuring against infestations. Regular Confession is particularly important. “This provides you,” he says, “with sanctifying Grace and keeps you healthy spiritually.” Purity and humility are particularly crucial. It’s why Mary is so powerful against darkness. “Confession is the sacrament of humility,” he emphasizes.

Rosary and daily meditation must also be included, the exorcist urges.

“I don’t know of anyone who meditates who has become either possessed or diabolically obsessed,” he notes — speaking, of course, of Catholic contemplation.
Can non-Catholic Christians also cast out demons, he was asked?

Yes, says Father Ripperger. Often. It’s all in using the Name of Jesus. But there are certain demons that only a priest can handle, and folks in other denominations sometimes come to him for help with particularly powerful forces.

With the sacraments, it’s easy to defeat them, says the priest; there is no reason to fear. We have control over all such spiritual circumstances through Jesus and our inner purity. Seeking every virtue is the key.

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Can Harry Potter lead to problems?

“One exorcist exorcised three children possessed by Harry Potter,” he says.

Children must stay away from everything with the tinge of the occult.

The rise of witchcraft in North America is a critical problem in this regard.

He also believes that demons can come down through families to the fourth and sometimes fifth generation.

Folks from places like Africa and India, as well as Hispanic regions, where occult religions like animism, Hinduism, and Santeria are practiced, can have enhanced problems. But
every nationality has its issues.

Our society in general, he says, is now more evil than at any time since at least the Roman Empire, having lost a sense of sin and impurity.

Can spirits of the deceased also afflict us?

Yes, says the exorcist, if they are “wicked” enough. Once in a house, a spirit — a disturbed, wandering spirit, a “preta” — may “pick” on people who allow attachment through their failings, which provide a portal to infection. He has noted exceptional problems when there is a history in a family of Freemasonry. In one case, a ten-year-old was possessed due to generational demons.

As for societal darkness, are we seeing disasters, such as the current wildfires, as a result? Are they  “signs of the times,” he was asked?
“Yes,” says the priest, for our considered  judgment. “Historically if people lead good and virtuous lives, you won’t see same frequency [of disasters].”




[resources: Deliverance Prayers: For Use By the Laity, highly recommended]
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[Return to www.spiritdaily.com]



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Christ have mercy on us.
Foreword to Paula Haigh's FAIRYLAND IS HELL, MAGIC IS DEMON POWER
 
In 2003, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger denounced the hugely popular ‘Potter’ books of J.K. Rowling. In a letter to a Catholic German Potter critic and author, he condemned the ‘subtle seductions’ of the Potter books that threaten to ‘corrupt the Christian faith in souls even before it could properly grow.’ In 2005, in conjunction with the release of the latest Rowling Potter book Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, and in view of the fact that the cardinal was by then elected as Pope Benedict XVI, this condemnation made world headlines.
    
In the same fantasy literature vein are some stories of J. J. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis, written many years before the Potter tales of Rowland. Of these, it would be hard to find an opinion poll in the world of popular books and literature that would not have Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings top of that list. Between them then, these authors fairly dominated the fiction market in the 20th century. Indeed, so successful were Lewis’s, Tolkien’s and Rowling’s stories that they were made into movies, breaking attendance records each time. What we can say then - as we enter the third millennium of the Christian era, a time when the Catholic faith is diminishing at an unprecedented pace - is that these fantasy tales have become part of modern culture for countless millions of Christian children and adults worldwide.
 
It is not a well known maxim that where religion regresses, superstition progresses. Ironically, whereas the Triune God of Catholicism is manifestly missing and the capabilities of Satan are consequently well hidden, the International Association of Exorcists reports an upsurge in demonic possession worldwide. Moreover, today we are also experiencing a proliferation of the occult, spiritualism, spiritual healing, witchcraft, fortune-telling etc., throughout the world. Crimes and behaviour, often violent, including horrific murders, are being committed in the name of Satan himself. The paradox is that although these dark forces are at work around us, there is also an inherent denial that any of it is real, merely the illusions of Christian ‘fundamentalists’. 
    
How then did Lucifer-Satan and his operative demons become trivialised as real beings, as powerful spirits hell-bent on luring us all to damnation with them in hell? Without doubt, fantasy literature played and continues to play a part. ‘Once the truths of Faith cease to be real to the modern mind, other more exciting worlds are invented as a means of escape from the real that no longer appeals to the jaded minds of moderns’ says Miss Paula Haigh.
    
And this is why the drug-crazy free-loving hippies of the 1960s recognised these fantasy tales for what they really are and took as their Bible Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, and how such books and movies have become the most popular ‘intellectual and spiritual’ pastime for both children and adults in our time.
 
Given the nature of the subject matter in these books, stories of fantasy worlds, wizards, witches, magic etc., one can understand that they generated, and continue to generate, considerable debate, even in the Church, but especially among Christian parents whose children were/are reading them, some even showing up on the curriculum in their schools as compulsory reading. Instinctively they know there is something wrong with these fantasy stories, but they just cannot put their finger on it. Certainly there are one or two who made a stab at a critique, but all lacked real substance and especially authority. What was needed then, was a proper well-researched thesis on the subject.
 
At the same time, a virtual cataract of apologists, both Catholic and Protestant, traditional and neo-Modernist, writing in books, journals, websites and newspapers throughout the world, dismiss these concerns as unfounded. It seems that the temptation to defend the fantasy literature of the ‘devout Roman Catholic’ Tolkien, the ‘deeply Christian’ Lewis and the ‘Christian living’ Rowling is too great in a world now bereft of popular Christian writers in any sphere.
 
The point is though, if Tolkien’s, Lewis’s or Rowling’s fantasy tales are Christian, then they should be manifestly Christian, and if they are manifestly Christian then there would be no debate about it. Indeed, we might well ask what do these commentators mean by ‘Christian’? Lauding that the triumph of good over evil or claiming the love and friendship shown between characters in these books makes them ‘Christian’ is patently ridiculous. In the first place such are simply natural virtues and can be found in anyone, even atheists. Secondly, it cannot be denied that these fantasy tales deliberately exclude every precept of Christianity such as the Trinity as Creator, Christ as Saviour, His Church as universal, His Sacraments as necessary, etc., etc. Moreover, these ‘glimmers of Christianity’ offered, fade away into absurdity when compared with arguments against the orthodoxy and dangers of such fantasy literature based on doctrines derived from traditional theology and disciplines. Accordingly, on foot of this principle alone, to counteract the weakness in the apologists’ thinking, we decided to publish this critique written by veteran American author Paula Haigh, a scholar of theology, philosophy and the empirical sciences related to cosmology and evolution.
 
Before introducing Miss Haigh’s thesis it must be said that one reason we hesitated to publish until now lies in the fact that the doctrines and prohibitions involved would be viewed today as coming from the ‘Dark Ages’, containing no relevance to twenty-first century Christians. The idea that such harmless reading and adventure fun-giving movies as The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix or The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe could be classed as harmful in any way could only bring disbelief and incredulity from any quarter, and risks being classed as a relic of the past, like Trent or the thinking of the Inquisition, and be discarded as irrelevant. But now Pope Benedict XVI’s earlier condemnation has changed all that. Accordingly, we can no longer stand by as more and more such publications emerge defended by some with their superficial ideas that such fantasy tales offer ‘a Christian vision’. If we are believing-Christians, and are aware of the origin, purpose and end of our religion, then true and accurate doctrine must be available for those who still have a love for truth. Never mind that such theology and insights have been discarded, forgotten, obscured and scorned for many years - truth never changes. If, behind all the fun and adventure there truly lurk deadly serious heresies, the subtle undermining of Christian belief, then it is our Christian duty to inform and be informed.   

 http://originsofman.angelfire.com/pdf/86.pdf
(12-13-2017, 08:34 AM)cassini Wrote: [ -> ]
It is not a well known maxim that where religion regresses, superstition progresses. Ironically, whereas the Triune God of Catholicism is manifestly missing and the capabilities of Satan are consequently well hidden, the International Association of Exorcists reports an upsurge in demonic possession worldwide. Moreover, today we are also experiencing a proliferation of the occult, spiritualism, spiritual healing, witchcraft, fortune-telling etc., throughout the world. Crimes and behaviour, often violent, including horrific murders, are being committed in the name of Satan himself. The paradox is that although these dark forces are at work around us, there is also an inherent denial that any of it is real, merely the illusions of Christian ‘fundamentalists’. 
    
How then did Lucifer-Satan and his operative demons become trivialised as real beings, as powerful spirits hell-bent on luring us all to damnation with them in hell? Without doubt, fantasy literature played and continues to play a part. ‘Once the truths of Faith cease to be real to the modern mind, other more exciting worlds are invented as a means of escape from the real that no longer appeals to the jaded minds of moderns’ says Miss Paula Haigh.
     

Not to get too off topic, but I have long considered that fantasy literature is trying to fill the void and yearning people have for the supernatural, the mystical.

God becoming man and speaking with us, Angels and Demons all around us and sometimes physically manifesting their faces to us, astounding miracles being performed by Saints, Heaven and Hell, the fight for one's salvation of soul- When these were foremost in everyone's minds, nurtured by ethereal Churches to contemplate the Divine, and witnessing sanctity more commonly as in the Middle Ages, there was no need for any fantasy literature based on non reality.

When the world lost its Faith and God began to withdraw His graces and the presence of miracle working Saints that everyone of good will could recognize as coming from the Supernatural Divine, the conditions were set for fantasy literature to be a substitute.