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Does anyone have a crib sheet for the days of required fasting and abstaining?  I'm new to traditional Catholicism, and just cannot keep it all straight.  Half the time I forget the Friday fasts, and I can't remember what is required when.

Help a gal out?  Thanks, and Merry Christmas!!

Inghean ("Nee-yah")
This page should help: https://www.fisheaters.com/fasting.html

If you're new to Tradition, see this entire section of the FishEaters website:  https://www.fisheaters.com/beingcatholic.html
(12-22-2017, 10:06 AM)VoxClamantis Wrote: [ -> ]This page should help: https://www.fisheaters.com/fasting.html
With all due respect, I would argue that the 'traditional' Eucharistic Fast is from midnight. Wasn't it Venerable Pius XII who modernised it to three hours, sometime in the 1950s?
(12-22-2017, 01:56 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-22-2017, 10:06 AM)VoxClamantis Wrote: [ -> ]This page should help: https://www.fisheaters.com/fasting.html
With all due respect, I would argue that the 'traditional' Eucharistic Fast is from midnight. Wasn't it Venerable Pius XII who modernised it to three hours, sometime in the 1950s?

Yep, the three hour fast is more of a modern thing. Although I'm sure that afternoon and evening Masses are more of a modern thing as well. Where I'm originally from in NY, TLMs are at 3pm. This would pretty much force you to wait until dinner to have your first bite of food on a Sunday which certainly seems like more harsh of a fast than what's allowed for normal weekday fasts. We certainly aren't supposed to be doing hard penances on Sunday. It certainly makes more sense to fast from midnight if you're going to a Mass prior to noon. In times where people had less of a need to be choosy about which Mass they went to, I'm sure they would either go to the first Mass that they woke up for or what would be the main Mass of the day which I'd assume would typically be between 9-11 am.
This is a good year to be new to the Church's practice in fasting and abstinence.  Since Christmas Eve lands on a Sunday you don't have to fast and abstain as you usually would.
(12-22-2017, 01:56 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(12-22-2017, 10:06 AM)VoxClamantis Wrote: [ -> ]This page should help: https://www.fisheaters.com/fasting.html
With all due respect, I would argue that the 'traditional' Eucharistic Fast is from midnight. Wasn't it Venerable Pius XII who modernised it to three hours, sometime in the 1950s?

From the page on fasting: "In this table, I give the fasting and abstinence practices for those who, out of personal devotion, want to keep the older practices given for the Universal Church in 1962. I also give the requirements according to the 1983 Code of Canon Law, which is what we are bound to."

The FE site uses the Douay and Vulgate Bibles, and the 1962 Missal and calendar, as do the priests of the FSSP, SSPX, ICK, etc. I always give the practices of that time along with any relevant current Canon law so people will know what they're canonically bound to AND what was done in 1962, the latter which they can practice voluntarily. Way too many trad sites out there ignore current Canon Law, randomly choose (or mix) Missals, and, so, are confusing as Hell, making Catholics think, for ex., that they're bound to practices they are not bound to, mixing up feasts in place in, say, 1933 with the 1962 Missal, etc. I think the standards set by the trad priests -- the non-schismatic ones -- most trads will encounter is the way to go.

From https://www.fisheaters.com/about2.html :


Quote:As you read, note the following:
  • I write with the 1962 Missal and Liturgical Calendar in mind because they are the most commonly used by traditional priests 1 
     


  • All Scriptural references are to the Douay-Rheims version of the Bible, including Psalm numbering. 2 
     


  • Where there is a difference between the new Code of Canon Law 3 and now voluntary but beneficial and common traditional Catholic practices, I try to state both so Catholics can know what they are canonically bound to -- but will nonetheless likely find their fellow traditionalists doing out of a love for the Church, a desire to be faithful to Her true Spirit, and in the spirit of true obedience.
Vox, I know all that, and I appreciate all the hard work you've done, and continue to do, for the spread of our Holy Faith. Personally, I would have just chosen another adjective than traditional to describe Pius XII's very untraditional Eucharistic Fast.