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Hi FishEaters!  I was just wondering if you guys recommended any good, traditional apologetics books for the Faith?  I know my catechism but am frightfully weak in the area of defending the Faith theologically/rationally.  Any help would be appreciated!  God bless!
(02-07-2018, 05:00 PM)SinnerSanctified25 Wrote: [ -> ]Hi FishEaters!  I was just wondering if you guys recommended any good, traditional apologetics books for the Faith?  I know my catechism but am frightfully weak in the area of defending the Faith theologically/rationally.  Any help would be appreciated!  God bless!

There are lots, I find this one helpful

https://www.baroniuspress.com/book.php?wid=56&bid=67#tab=tab-1
This would be a good start: here. A few years ago, Vox put together a nice book/pdf for that purpose. I've attached it.
Read Garrigou-Lagrange's work Reality
http://www.thesumma.info/reality/index.php
Having a solid understanding of the faith is enough to do well in apologetics.
I've had plenty of doubts before on various issues, but the advantage of that has been that I've been able to find a pretty good list of books that would be good for defending the faith on most grounds: 

Against atheism:

Edward Feser's Aquinas, 5 Proofs for the Existence of God, and The Last Superstition

For Christianity in regards to the reliability of the Bible: 

(Catholics have been frankly not very good in this area so these are by Protestants but they are pretty good regardless) 

Kenneth Kitchen's On the Reliability of the Old Testament (this covers stuff like Moses and Abraham) 

James Hoffmeier's Israel in Egypt and Israel in Sinai (a more in depth book on just the Exodus) 

I don't remember who wrote it, but somebody I know and trust very well recommended it to me: A Biblical History of Israel

(same thing - about the Old Testament) 

Mike Licona - the Resurrection. (I forget the exact name of his book specifically on the resurrection but it could be called just The Resurrection.) 

Mike Licona - Why are There Differences in the Gospels? (this is a book about supposed 'contradictions' specifically in the Gospels) 

There's also the classic by FF Bruce - Are the New Testament Documents Reliable? 

Gary Habermas I think also wrote a book on the resurrection, but he's not as highly regarded as Mike Licona. (all the guys I listed here have published for places like Oxford and are bona fide scholars, though they're not mainstream they're definitely not people a serious person would brush aside and their arguments to me are pretty strong) 

William Lane Craig's Reasonable Faith goes into the arguments for God and Christianity but in less depth, he's a world known philosopher (though a Protestant) and I would recommend it out of all of the books if you're looking for something basic and convincing. (though Feser is important too) 


I guess the other specific issue would be evolution, there it depends on what you think. Personally I have no dog in the race, I don't really think evolution is contrary to the faith per se, so I just run with what 'mainstream scientists' say, and a good book defending evolution being compatible with Christianity is John Lennox's Seven Days that Divide the World. (took it out of the library, have read a bit, it's highly regarded, he's a top professor, etc. (again, he's a Protestant)

If you're less happy to support evolution, David Berlinski, who is an agnostic, wrote a book explaining how evolution is not actually very well supported: The Devil's Delusion. (he is not a scientist, but his books on math are basic textbooks that people who study math know, so he's not exactly a cooke) 

For defending specifically the Catholic faith as opposed to just Christianity in general, Cardinal Gibbons wrote a book called The Faith of Our Fathers. It basically gives a simple defense of every point of contention between say Protestants and Catholics. (Papacy, Mary, Sacraments, etc) 







These are a lot of books, some of which I've read, others which I heard from testimony and from watching lectures are very good. Out of this list, I'd say that it's worth specifically only getting Feser's Aquinas, William Lane Craig's Reasonable Faith, and Cardinal Gibbon's Faith of Our Fathers. These deal with the basic issues and would give answers to the objections that 90% of people would give. A lot of the other ones are very niche and not worth getting into.