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Could a person confess a second time sins that he has had absolved already? 

I believe I heard in in one of Fr. Ripperger's video on confession, and if I remember correctly he said that when we are confessing venial sins and if we have no mortal sin, then we can mention an already confessed mortal sin during the confession.
Father was correct AFAIK. A previously confessed moral sin is sufficient matter for confession.
(02-15-2018, 05:42 PM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: [ -> ]Could a person confess a second time sins that he has had absolved already? 

I believe I heard in in one of Fr. Ripperger's video on confession, and if I remember correctly he said that when we are confessing venial sins and if we have no mortal sin, then we can mention an already confessed mortal sin during the confession.

By confessing an already-confessed mortal sin, assuming that everything about the confession was valid, then you are professing you don't really believe the sin was forgiven.  You would make your second confession a travesty of the sacrament.

You don't have to confess venial sins, but it is perfectly acceptable to confess venial sins if that is all you have at the time.  You do not have to refrain from confessing until you have a mortal sin.
Could you two provide your reasoning?  Obviously, there is a big difference between sufficient matter for a sacrament and a travesty of the sacrament.
(02-15-2018, 05:51 PM)Justin Alphonsus Wrote: [ -> ]Could you two provide your reasoning?  Obviously, there is a big difference between sufficient matter for a sacrament and a travesty of the sacrament.

I mean, I think it's pretty logical.  If you have validly confessed a sin before, there is no reason for you to confess it again unless you believe it really wasn't absolved in the previous confession.

I have never heard of adding in a previously confessed mortal sin to go with venial sin.  You don't need to confess venial sin.  Perhaps in the Latin church they are stricter about when it is appropriate to go to confession than they are in the Melkite church, but if all you have is venial sin, and you don't need to confess venial sin, then either it is acceptable to forgo confessing until you do have a mortal sin, or it is acceptable to confess venial sins when they are all you are guilty of.  There is no need to add in a previously confessed mortal sin just so you can go to confession when you don't need to, outside of intense scrupulosity.
Here you go. Not my reasoning, but that of a Priest. I'm not positive when this was written, but all the footnotes that are dated are pre-1950, so I think it's pretty solid. All I know is that it agrees with every Confessor I've ever had on those very few occasions I had no sin to confess.

Quote:THE GENERIC CONFESSION OF DEVOTION 
GERALD KELLY, S.J. St. Mary's College
THE most direct approach to my subject can be made, I think, by means of a brief casus conscientiae: One Saturday afternoon, when confessions were not particularly heavy^ a penitent entered Father Anselm's confessional and made the following accusation: "Father, my last confession was two weeks ago. Since then I have not committed any serious sins, but I want to accuse myself of all the sins of my life. I am sorry for my sins and ask you for a penance and absolution." Though the penitent was a perfect stranger, Father Anselm judged from his manner and the tone of his voice that he was not the much abused rudis of moral theology. He apparently knew the meaning of sin and of sorrow for sin and was sincerely seeking the graces annexed to the sacrament of penance. Without doubt he could have mentioned some specific sins of his past life if he were asked to do so. But Father Anselm asked no questions. He assigned a small penance, gave absolution, and dismissed his penitent. 


Link to the entire 22 page article.
(02-15-2018, 05:45 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]Father was correct AFAIK. A previously confessed moral sin is sufficient matter for confession.

Penance is a sacrament of the New Law in which sins committed by a rightly disposed faithful after baptism are forgiven by the judicial absolution of an authorized minister.

This judicial absolution is given in the manner of a judgement, and this is the essence of this sacrament.

The remote and necessary matter is all mortal sin committed after baptism and not yet duly submitted to the power of the keys of the Church by confession. This is De Fide (Council of Trent, Sess. xiv, De pænitentia, cap. 5 & Can. 7—Dz 899,917/DS 1679, 1707)

According to the same, and all theologians it is theologically certain that venial sins not yet confessed and all actual sins already confessed and remitted are the remote, free and sufficient matter of the sacrament.

According to the Councils of Trent and Florence (Cf Dz 699,895-896/DS 1323, 1671-1675) the proximate matter is the three acts of the penitent: contrition, confession and satisfaction.

Even were we to doubt that all actual sins already confessed and remitted are valid matter, it is clear that the proximate matter still exists in such a confession. One can certainly still be contrite, confess and have the desire to satisfy for a past sin already confessed. In fact, this free confession can, in fact, be one way of satisfying.

Fr Nicholas Halligan, O.P. explains in his Administration of the Sacraments :

Quote:Even though a sin has already been remitted, it always remains a sin committed and thus the object of the penitent's renewed sorrow; the absolution increases grace, which is of itself destructive of sin.

... The confession of a certain sin already remitted insures sufficient matter for the sacrament when there is no new matter to confess, and more surely renews true sorrow for them.

Here Fr. Halligan is merely drawing from St. Thomas Aquinas (ST Suppl., q. 18, a. 2, ad 4): 


Quote:When absolution is given a second time grace is increased, and the greater the grace received, the less there remains of the blemish of the previous sin, and the less punishment
is required to remove that blemish.
I've heard of mentioning past sins at the end of your Confession. But how does it work when you have nothing else to confess? How do you mention number of times if you've committed a certain sin many times in the past?
(02-15-2018, 10:03 PM)GangGreen Wrote: [ -> ]I've heard of mentioning past sins at the end of your Confession. But how does it work when you have nothing else to confess? How do you mention number of times if you've committed a certain sin many times in the past?

First, if you do a good examination of conscience you can probably come up with at least a few venial sins. (Prov. 24.16 : The just man sins seven times a day.)

Secondly, if you really can't find any sin in your examination, because you're just sinless and perfect, then probably you could confess pride. The Saints generally saw themselves as the worst of sinners, because despite their many graces, they still even committed indeliberate venial sins.

Thirdly, if you really still can't find something, are you sure there's not at least one deliberate venial sin you've committed since the last confession? (e.g. wasting your time, overeating, some unedifying conversation, an uncharitible thought ...)

After all that, if you are in the church and there's a confessor who has no one and is just sitting there and you want to get the extra graces, after making a proper examination, say how long ago your last confession was, say "I have no grave sins since the last confession and want to confess several past sins for which I am particularly sorry, such as ..."

Then name the sins. Be generic and to the point, since yours in a confession of devotion (e.g. "the 25 years I stayed away from Mass", or "the years I was living in sin with my boyfriend/girlfriend", "my past habit of masturbation", "the $10,000 I stole and repaid", etc.). Mention a big mortal sin, or at least one you are particularly ashamed of.

Don't just use this as a place to ask questions to the priest, do that outside of the confessional, unless impossible (such questions probably don't fall under the seal anyway unless they are directly related to your sins, so there's no reason to ask inside unless it involves your sins and making a proper confession).

In such a confession expect minimal or no advice, it should be no longer than a minute to two minutes (max), and remember that if you're in the confession line doing this, there may be someone else who has serious sins to confess and you're taking up time. If Father is only hearing confessions before a Sunday or Holyday Mass, it's best in Fraternal Charity to let others go to confession and wait until you have at least a venial sin to confess. Remember that the vast majority of people over 12 years old are probably are not going to just make another confession of devotion, but most likely have mortal sins, or at least serious venial sins to confess.