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Full Version: Dining out on Sunday after Church -- did I do the right thing?
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My in-laws were in town this weekend. I went to church on Sunday while they and my non-religious wife slept in. When I got back from Mass, my wife and in-laws had been waiting for me to get back so we could all go get breakfast at a local diner. I'm generally pretty steadfast in my refusal to engage in any sort of commerce on the Lord's Day (to avoid the sin myself and to avoid endorsing the sin of others), but I also did not want to be rude to my in-laws, who live nearly 5 hours away so we don't get to see them often. The diner is a town over on their way back home, so they were going to depart from there after breakfast.

So I ended up going out with them, but I simply didn't order anything, and sat and sipped on my complementary water while having a nice conversation with them instead. Was this a good compromise, or ought I not have compromised at all?
I seems like a decent compromise to me. 

Also, I'm jealous that your inlaws live 5 hours away. :D
Long-standing custom justifies that inns and restaurants are legitimately visited by Catholics on Holy Days and Sundays, and thus are legitimate Sunday work.

Likewise sporting games, museums, parks and other recreation sites and such are all legitimate activities (and thus legitimate work) on Sundays.

Go, enjoy the bacon.
(04-09-2018, 03:03 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]Long-standing custom justifies that inns and restaurants are legitimately visited by Catholics on Holy Days and Sundays, and thus are legitimate Sunday work.

Likewise sporting games, museums, parks and other recreation sites and such are all legitimate activities (and thus legitimate work) on Sundays.

Go, enjoy the bacon.

That's what I thought. I felt he was being scrupulous.
Sunday lunch after 10am mass was a tradition when I was growing up. When I go home for a visit I still go out after Mass with my mom. I never thought of it as being a problem.
Always do things to be charitable. They wanted to spend more time with you. The diner employees need to pay bills. On Sundays leave a better tip. That's what I do.
(04-09-2018, 01:25 PM)Galahad3 Wrote: [ -> ]My in-laws were in town this weekend. I went to church on Sunday while they and my non-religious wife slept in. When I got back from Mass, my wife and in-laws had been waiting for me to get back so we could all go get breakfast at a local diner. I'm generally pretty steadfast in my refusal to engage in any sort of commerce on the Lord's Day (to avoid the sin myself and to avoid endorsing the sin of others), but I also did not want to be rude to my in-laws, who live nearly 5 hours away so we don't get to see them often. The diner is a town over on their way back home, so they were going to depart from there after breakfast.

So I ended up going out with them, but I simply didn't order anything, and sat and sipped on my complementary water while having a nice conversation with them instead. Was this a good compromise, or ought I not have compromised at all?
Peace.....I read that you "refuse to engage in any sort of commerce on the Lord's Day" and wondered if this is a personal decision/commitment you have made.  I say this, because Sunday is a Resurrection Day and also we are in Easter season.  In other words, would it have made a difference that you were eating a prepared meal at home with your visitors?  Is it the "commerce" or exchange of money/business transaction specifically you are refusing?  If it is, then perhaps you could arrange with your wife to have a home-cooked meal if guests visit on Sunday??  Just a thought.....God bless, angeltime :heart:
I thought I was possibly being scrupulous, so before I posted this thread I consulted the "Keeping the Lord's Day" page on the main Fisheater's Site (under "Being Catholic"), and it said that eating out qualifies as making others do servile work. I'm a fairly new Catholic so I am unfamilar with many of the "unwritten rules," but doing anything to make a profit (or encouraging others to do so) on the Lord's Day seems a bit "off" to me. I understand the need for fundamentally charitable services (police, hospitals, etc.) to remain available on Sundays, of course, but I'm having trouble seeing how diners and whatnot fit that bill. 

Of course I also understand charity from the consumer's perspective -- supporting local businesses and being involved in the community -- but I don't see where the line is (or should be) drawn. Can you go buy a video game from a local electronics store that stays open on Sundays? Rent a DVD to watch with your family from the local video store? Get your oil changed and tires rotated by the local mechanic? Shop for groceries for Sunday dinner at Wal-Mart, staffed by local people just trying to make a paycheck?

At any rate I appreciate the feedback and I'll try to be less rigid from now on I suppose.
I understand your motivation, but as has been pointed out what you did is not a sin. I agree that in an ideal world, shops, restaurants, etc. would be closed in honour of the Lord's Day. In our modern world, that ain't gonna happen, unfortunately. 'Blue laws' have consistently been struck down by the courts, tho' some jurisdictions have passed laws mandating closing one day a week. Obviously, this is usually Sunday, tho' some restaurants choose to close on another day, often Monday, which tends to the slowest day of the week for them.

As a aside, many years ago, before I became a Catholic, I worked in a Kinney's shoe store on the Kansas side of the Kansas City metro. Everyone wanted to transfer to the Missouri side, because Missouri had a blue law that prohibited the sale of most non-essential item on Sunday. Restaurants were excepted however, since that tends to be one of their best sales days.
It seems to be one of the "rules" that not many follow (or even know about) anymore, like attending the wedding of a Catholic outside the Church.

So for those of us trying to resurrect Tradition, it's difficult because for some of these things you get a different answer from different priests.

A very observant NO priest came to our house for dinner during Lent once.  Our family hadn't given up sweets that Lent but some other sacrifice and we had a lovely dessert which I offered to Father but added, "Oh, I hope you didn't give up sweets for Lent."

He replied that he had but, "Charity prevails."

So out of charity (and I know it was that as he fasted a great deal, worked out regularly and was a man of great discipline), he shared in the joy of the dessert with our family.

This seems to be apropos in your case as well.

I suppose diners need to be open for travelers.

Yet the story of the Land Without A Sunday seems to be becoming the story of America so we must be careful of the habits we instill in our families.

Here is a good sermon on this topic by an FSSP priest:

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