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Full Version: can a person LOSE his/her vocation?
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I really would like to know bc I have known priests I thought should actually (maybe) get out of the priesthood, had been there a long time, didn't want to be without a woman and/or other issues

so I would like to know..

Can't a person have a vocation for say 20 years and then... God could call that person to another kind of life outsdie the priesthood?

just wondering---------

this one priest i know of... I'm sorry but there is no way someone like that should be a priest. IMO he is a psychopath (lacking substantial proof, but it has been "proven" to me beyond serious  refutation, that is for sure)
(04-25-2018, 01:32 PM)gracemary5 Wrote: [ -> ]I really would like to know bc I have known priests I thought should actually (maybe) get out of the priesthood, had been there a long time, didn't want to be without a woman and/or other issues

so I would like to know..

Can't a person have a vocation for say 20 years and then... God could call that person to another kind of life outsdie the priesthood?

just wondering---------

this one priest i know of... I'm sorry but there is no way someone like that should be a priest. IMO he is a psychopath (lacking substantial proof, but it has been "proven" to me beyond serious  refutation, that is for sure)

No, God calls you to one vocation and if it is the Priesthood, it is for life. God may call someone to be married and then to the priesthood, but never the other way around.

If a priest leaves the priesthood, it is because he chose to, not because God called him.
The Lord hath sworn and He shall not repent. Thou art a priest forever according to the order of Melchizedek.

Ordination leaves an indelible mark on a man's soul, even if he is laicised he retains his priestly character.
(04-25-2018, 01:40 PM)austenbosten Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-25-2018, 01:32 PM)gracemary5 Wrote: [ -> ]I really would like to know bc I have known priests I thought should actually (maybe) get out of the priesthood, had been there a long time, didn't want to be without a woman and/or other issues

so I would like to know..

Can't a person have a vocation for say 20 years and then... God could call that person to another kind of life outsdie the priesthood?

just wondering---------

this one priest i know of... I'm sorry but there is no way someone like that should be a priest. IMO he is a psychopath (lacking substantial proof, but it has been "proven" to me beyond serious  refutation, that is for sure)

No, God calls you to one vocation and if it is the Priesthood, it is for life.  God may call someone to be married and then to the priesthood, but never the other way around.

If a priest leaves the priesthood, it is because he chose to, not because God called him.
I don't believe this is officialChurch teaching
(04-25-2018, 01:52 PM)Dominicus Wrote: [ -> ]The Lord hath sworn and He shall not repent. Thou art a priest forever according to the order of Melchizedek.

Ordination leaves an indelible mark on a man's soul, even if he is laicised he retains his priestly character.

you would still be a priest if you left and married. But I am not necessarily speaking of marrying but living as a single person (after leaving priesthood)

But I have to laugh bc I don't think most priests could make it in the world after being a priest..

(the laugh is just a private joke kind of thing..)
(04-25-2018, 02:22 PM)gracemary5 Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-25-2018, 01:40 PM)austenbosten Wrote: [ -> ]No, God calls you to one vocation and if it is the Priesthood, it is for life.  God may call someone to be married and then to the priesthood, but never the other way around.

If a priest leaves the priesthood, it is because he chose to, not because God called him.
I don't believe this is officialChurch teaching

A priest has an indelible mark put upon their soul when they receive the the laying of the hands.  This can never be removed.  Priests can be "laicised" which means their faculties to licitly confer the Sacraments are suspended, but they still have the mark and still can validly (although illicitly) confer the Sacraments.

The Lord hath sworn, and he will not repent: Thou art a priest for ever according to the order of Melchisedech. (PS 109.4)

As in the case of Baptism and Confirmation this share in Christ's office is granted once for all. the sacrament of Holy Orders, like the other two, confers an indelible spiritual character and cannot be repeated or conferred temporarily. (CCC 1582)

Once validly received, sacred ordination never becomes invalid. (Can. 290)


So no.  God does not call someone to repent of their Baptism and likewise, does not call them to repent of their vocation.  This also include divorce for Holy Matrimony. When God calls a man to become a priest, and he answers the call, he enters a marriage. One that will never end until his death.
(04-25-2018, 02:34 PM)austenbosten Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-25-2018, 02:22 PM)gracemary5 Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-25-2018, 01:40 PM)austenbosten Wrote: [ -> ]No, God calls you to one vocation and if it is the Priesthood, it is for life.  God may call someone to be married and then to the priesthood, but never the other way around.

If a priest leaves the priesthood, it is because he chose to, not because God called him.
I don't believe this is officialChurch teaching

A priest has an indelible mark put upon their soul when they receive the the laying of the hands.  This can never be removed.  Priests can be "laicised" which means their faculties to licitly confer the Sacraments are suspended, but they still have the mark and still can validly (although illicitly) confer the Sacraments.

The Lord hath sworn, and he will not repent: Thou art a priest for ever according to the order of Melchisedech. (PS 109.4)

As in the case of Baptism and Confirmation this share in Christ's office is granted once for all. the sacrament of Holy Orders, like the other two, confers an indelible spiritual character and cannot be repeated or conferred temporarily. (CCC 1582)

Once validly received, sacred ordination never becomes invalid. (Can. 290)


So no.  God does not call someone to repent of their Baptism and likewise, does not call them to repent of their vocation.  This also include divorce for Holy Matrimony.  When God calls a man to become a priest, and he answers the call, he enters a marriage.  One that will never end until his death.

I never said otherwise nor have I believed otherwise. What is not Church teaching is that it is OK according to you apparently, when a once married man becomes a priest but not the other way around

I used to have an attitude toward this one former priest (yes, I know, he is still a priest) who married, but as the years went by and I matured and etc... well, I don't have a problem with that, even though it has to be a case by case kind of thing.. not all priests who fall in love should marry, to be sure...

anyway, once again I forgot something i was going to say or trying to say...

but yeh, that is an important point, that .. I mean, why would it be good for a once married man to become a priest but no priest should ever marry? 

don't get your reasoning. And the Church disagrees because they do allow priests to marry
Dispensation is always the Church tolerating a situation which is not ideal.

For a priest to be "laicized" means he is dispensed from the duties of the priesthood, and sometimes, but not always, dispensed from him implicit vow of celibacy. No matter the reason this is done it is considered a penalty. It requires a canonical trial or process by which the authority (the Pope) judges that the man is by his own fault incapable of exercising the duties of a priest.

Historically it was only enacted upon those who had committed some grave crime. In more modern times given the extreme weakness of men (Mt 19.8), the Holy See has enacted it when priests request it voluntarily after proving that there is a serious problem which they are unwilling to or cannot easily correct.

Properly speaking, however, it is always the result of a man committing grave sins and refusing the graces necessary to avoid them for a long time, thus making him unfit to continue acting as a priest. This might be because he refuses obedience for such a long time and gives such scandal that he must be "defrocked" (e.g. Alfred Loisy, the Modernist to whom Lamentabili and Pascendi were directed ). It also come be because of a lack of priestly discipline for such a long time and habit of sin that he cannot remain continent, so because he will be because of his weak will and habitual sins, violating his vow. he is reduced to the lay state and given dispensation to marry.

In that sense, if a priest leaves the priesthood, there is always grave fault, and it is always because he threw away his vocation.

Of course there may be other circumstances and factors which make such an act slightly less grave (e.g. an abusive superior, ill health, psychological issues). Still, God always gives the grace necessary to avoid every sin, and thus every grave fault.

In that sense one never loses his vocation once it is settled (i.e. by Ordination or Perpetual Profession in a Religious Institute), but one can through his fault abandon that vocation that God called him to.

The very fact that Ordination invalidates any attempted marriage, and the Pope alone can dispense from this and only for those who have been laicized, should show that it is the Church tolerating an evil to prevent worse evils.
(04-25-2018, 02:58 PM)gracemary5 Wrote: [ -> ]And the Church disagrees because they do allow priests to marry

The Church does not allow priests to marry. She allows married men to become priests.

Only when a man has, by his own fault, abandoned the priesthood, will the Church, in her Mercy and only when every other means is exhausted will try to give him a means of still saving his soul, perhaps permit him to marry to protect him from the danger solitary sins (which he has probably previously shown a proclivity), but this is long after he has been reduced to the lay state, and even then a reduction to the lay state does not automatically always include such a dispensation.