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Who are some big names that are considered modernists to the average Traditional Catholic? I'm wondering because I think a modernist is a euphemism for Jew and I want to do thorough research on this to see if it's true. Using euphemisms is a terrible thing because we can't correctly define the enemy which is why I'm concerned.
all i can do is speak for myself

to me a modernist is someone who... well, maybe someone who essentially thinks that truth changes w/ the times?

a person who does not want to cling to tradition  bc "them old-fashioned people who lived long ago and didn't know any better" did that.. so that must be wrong and old news and etc...
Jesuit Priest Father James Martin.
I don't see that Talmudists have much to do with it, tho' I'm sure they're happy with it. I'd say the top one is 'who am I to judge?, We all have the same god' Francis.
(05-10-2018, 02:00 PM)Patmappas28 Wrote: [ -> ]Who are some big names that are considered modernists to the average Traditional Catholic? I'm wondering because I think a modernist is a euphemism for Jew and I want to do thorough research on this to see if it's true. Using euphemisms is a terrible thing because we can't correctly define the enemy which is why I'm concerned.

At its core, I consider the modernists to be the collection of French and German theologians who endorsed the ‘nouvelle theologie’, and are responsible for many of the reforms at Vll, which would have His Holiness Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI at the top of the list. 

That school of thought would also include Pierre Tiellard De Chardin, Henri Du Lubac, Yves Congar, Hans Urs Von Balthasar, Hans Kung, and Karl Rahner
(05-10-2018, 02:12 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]I don't see that Talmudists have much to do with it, tho' I'm sure they're happy with it. I'd say the top one is 'who am I to judge?, We all have the same god' Francis.

Francis said we all have the same God?


um... sorry, Dude, but it looks like you serve a different "god"

namely: the god of this world (for the biblically illiterate, that means Satan)
(05-10-2018, 03:07 PM)The Tax Collector Wrote: [ -> ]
(05-10-2018, 02:00 PM)Patmappas28 Wrote: [ -> ]Who are some big names that are considered modernists to the average Traditional Catholic? I'm wondering because I think a modernist is a euphemism for Jew and I want to do thorough research on this to see if it's true. Using euphemisms is a terrible thing because we can't correctly define the enemy which is why I'm concerned.

At its core, I consider the modernists to be the collection of French and German theologians who endorsed the ‘nouvelle theologie’, and are responsible for many of the reforms at Vll, which would have His Holiness Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI at the top of the list. 

That school of thought would also include Pierre Tiellard De Chardin, Henri Du Lubac, Yves Congar, Hans Urs Von Balthasar, Hans Kung, and Karl Rahner

Recall from Pascendi that while Modernism is not a monolitic entity, there are two main principles that run throughout all the various fields : Agnosticism and Vital Immanence.

Strictly speaking only de Chardin among those could possibly qualify as a "Modernist".

The other's most certainly adopted the same conclusions as Modernists, but are part of a group better called "Neo-Modernists". De Lubac was a founding member of this movement when he with other realized that Agnosticism may sound good, but torpedos any serious attempt at theology. If I cannot objectively know the supernatural, it's somewhat difficult to do any theology, even bad theology.

Instead if Agnosticism is replaced with Existensialism, it provides the foundation for a more robust theology. That began with de Lubac's intentional confusion of the supernatural and natural orders to make man "naturally supernatural" moving toward the idea that sanctifying grace is natural to man ... leading to quasi-universal salvation or at least a re-reading of Catholic theology to suggest universal salvation and undermine the uniqueness of the Catholic Church (à la John Paul II's Redemptor Hominis).