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Does addiction to a particular sin (in my case, self abuse) negate the full consent stipulation for that sin to be mortal? If not, are there any sins that might fit this category? Or is this something that a person can only decide for himself? 

At what point can one say that they have no control over a particular bad habit or vice, or can one ever say that at all?
(06-16-2018, 09:22 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does addiction to a particular sin (in my case, self abuse) negate the full consent stipulation for that sin to be mortal? If not, are there any sins that might fit this category? Or is this something that a person can only decide for himself? 

At what point can one say that they have no control over a particular bad habit or vice, or can one ever say that at all?

Addiction and bad habits can diminish a the willfulness of an action, but only if it removes the use of your reason and will can it absolve you of mortal guilt from an action you know to be a mortal sin.

Full consent always goes with full awareness of the action. If one is fully aware of what they are doing, and does the action which they understand to be a grave sin, they have fully consented.

In short, no, self-abuse when one is fully conscious and understands what he is doing is always a grave sin.
(06-16-2018, 09:22 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does addiction to a particular sin (in my case, self abuse) negate the full consent stipulation for that sin to be mortal? If not, are there any sins that might fit this category? Or is this something that a person can only decide for himself? 

At what point can one say that they have no control over a particular bad habit or vice, or can one ever say that at all?

This is a question I would bring to my confessor
An exception could be made in cases where you find yourself masturbating purely out of habit with no thought to it. Often when we make a habit of these things we find ourselves doing them without realizing it but if you recognize it and yet continue then yes it becomes a mortal sin.
St Mary Magdalen de Pazi said that she was surprised to see the low place in Purgatory that those who suffered from addiction suffered in Purgatory.
(06-16-2018, 09:22 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does addiction to a particular sin (in my case, self abuse) negate the full consent stipulation for that sin to be mortal? If not, are there any sins that might fit this category? Or is this something that a person can only decide for himself? 

At what point can one say that they have no control over a particular bad habit or vice, or can one ever say that at all?

Vice, i.e., bad habit, can incline you to sin by expediting the voluntary process of consent.  That is why, when you have full knowledge of your vices and their effects, it is imperative that you put up safeguards to prevent the occurrence of sin by those bad habits. 

Habit, or bad habit, does not per se remove a person's capacity to give consent of the will to an action presented for approval to the intellect.  Crossing a line into irrational passion by habit would remove a person's ability to give consent of the will, but all actions prior to the loss of rational sense would have to be judged in accordance with the doctrine on human actions (cf. CCC Art. 4 The Morality of Human Acts).  This means that knowing of a weakness and tendency to sin, you do not sufficiently protect yourself from falling into sin, you have failed in moral agency by omission.  Since the matter of the fall is grave (self-abuse), the omission is grave.  If you omitted due care with full knowledge (i.e., you know to omit care is gravely evil and you know you are omitting proper care) and consent of the will (i.e., you yield when you have the capacity to take the proper care), then you have committed a mortal sin in allowing yourself to cross the line into irrational passion.  You may not actually be guilty of the mortal sin of self-abuse if you're in fact out of your right mind, but rather guilty of a mortal sin in putting yourself into the occasion of sin when you allow the circumstances to align so that you fall in the grave matter of self-abuse.

You have to examine your conscience deliberately and with focus to see what is the case.  After I had my excommunication lifted in 2008, I had to discipline myself with questions on a piece of paper to examine my conscience:

1) What is the name of the sin you accuse yourself of?
2) Did you know that the sin was grave matter?
3) Did you know that you were committing that sin?
4) Did you yield to continue the recognized sin rather than to stop it?

Best wishes for you.
(06-16-2018, 09:22 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does addiction to a particular sin (in my case, self abuse) negate the full consent stipulation for that sin to be mortal? If not, are there any sins that might fit this category? Or is this something that a person can only decide for himself? 

At what point can one say that they have no control over a particular bad habit or vice, or can one ever say that at all?

Bottom line is that this is something you will need to discuss with your confessor in the secrecy of confession.