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The Anglican Ordinariates have basically been operating with a free pass from criticism, but time is up, and Reign of Mary exposes some serious issues with this new rite.


"Generating a stir in traditional circles, Reign of Mary seeks to confront false traditionalism and help re-establish a truly Christian civilisation."

Twitter - @reignofmary1
Discord - https://discord.gg/hzmwZxC
Fr. Nichols' is a book that reeks of the Benedict XVI "conservative" Catholic mentality. By conservative, we mean what would have been described as "heresy" as recently as the pontificate of Ven. Pius XII. The book glowingly approves of then-Cardinal Ratzinger's statement that, "[Ecumenism] should be less oriented towards success [conversion to Catholicism]". This is echoed in Cardinal Newman's scandalous letter, dated July 1857:

I think it is for the interest of Catholicism that individuals [individual Anglicans, q.v.] should not join us, but should remain {within Anglicanism} to leaven the mass -- I mean that they will do more for us by remaining where they are than by coming over...


http://reignofmary.blogspot.com/2018/06/...iates.html

this letter was written prior to Pope Leo's decree of the invalidity of Anglican orders.
A questionable new liturgy

Pope St. Pius V arguably forbade the creation of new liturgical rites within the Catholic Church. In the 1570 bull Quo Primum, Pius V ordered:
[Image: pius-v-quo-primum.jpeg]
Pope Pius V has prohibited new rites
Quote:This new rite alone is to be used unless approval of the practice of saying Mass differently was given at the very time of the institution and confirmation of the church by Apostolic See at least 200 years ago, or unless there has prevailed a custom of a similar kind which has been continuously followed for a period of not less than 200 years, in which most cases We in no wise rescind their above-mentioned prerogative or custom.
This means that all rites created after 1370 AD (200 years prior to Quo Primum)  are illicit, and under this heading would fall, besides the Novus Ordo, the Anglican Use ("Divine Worship") as well. It would seem that, while certainly valid, all of these new rites are illicit according to Quo Primum, which is in the words of Pius V binding for all time.


http://reignofmary.blogspot.com/2018/06/...iates.html

This command of Pope St Pius V is part of the discipline of the Catholic Church. However while obedience to legitimate authority is part of the divine law, discipline is not. A later Pope can come and change that discipline if he feels that that is what the Church needs.
But it doesn't just stop at the Mass itself: Fr. Nichols explains the liturgical calendar for the Anglican Use, proposed to be the same as the "current seasonal calendar of the Church of England", as well as "a number of English or British commemorations" (meaning, presumably, Anglican "saints" will continue to be honored at the Ordinariates' altars). Of course, there are even more problems with the Ordinariate: for example, it seems to be opening the door to married clergy, if not an end to priestly continence.


http://reignofmary.blogspot.com/2018/06/...iates.html

the issue of a married clergy doesn't start with the Anglican usage. This has been an open discussion worldwide for many years. It could just as easily come to the West from the Amazon basin.
The final point is to ask what the end-game of the Anglican Ordinariates are. I have already explained that I believe the Ordinariates and their leaders desire to establish a new Uniate Church separate from the Latin Church. But I also believe the Ordinariates serve a useful purpose for the Conciliar Church: it channels traditionalists into manageable camps, preventing an open resistance to the Vatican II heresy. Although the Ordinariates may appear traditional on the outside, on the inside they are just propping up the dying Vatican II sect. Most alarmingly: are the Anglican Ordinariates a slippery slope to the full capitulation of the Catholic Church to Protestantism? May God and may Our Lady forbid it.


http://reignofmary.blogspot.com/2018/06/...iates.html

There may be a desire to create a new church in communion with the Catholic along the same lines as the Eastern rite churches. There are however some important differences. Eastern rite churches have their own canon law. They have their won structure.
(06-26-2018, 04:23 AM)Poche Wrote: [ -> ]But it doesn't just stop at the Mass itself: Fr. Nichols explains the liturgical calendar for the Anglican Use, proposed to be the same as the "current seasonal calendar of the Church of England", as well as "a number of English or British commemorations" (meaning, presumably, Anglican "saints" will continue to be honored at the Ordinariates' altars).

http://reignofmary.blogspot.com/2018/06/...iates.html

The seasonal calendar is the same as Sarum, which includes Septuagesima and counts Sundays after Trinity rather than after Pentecost. And there are plenty of Catholic English and British saints that aren't in the General Roman Calendar. According to Wikipedia, it includes these saints. I don't see an Anglican among them.


    12 January – Saint Benedict Biscop, abbot – optional memorial
    4 February – Saint Gilbert of Sempringham, religious – optional memorial
    22 February – Chair of Saint Peter the Apostle – solemnity
    1 March – Saint David, bishop – optional memorial
    23 April – Saint George, martyr – obligatory memorial. As a result, Saint Adalbert is deferred and shares the next day with Saint Fidelis of Sigmaringen as optional memorials
    4 May – The English Martyrs, optional memorial
    19 May – Saints Dunstan, Ethelwold, and Oswald, bishops – memorial
    9 June – Saint Columba, abbot – optional memorial
    16 June – Saint Richard of Chichester, bishop – optional memorial
    20 June – Saint Alban, protomartyr of England – optional memorial
    22 June – Saints John Fisher, bishop, and Thomas More, martyrs – memorial
    23 June – Saint Paulinus of Nola, bishop, or Saints Hilda, Etheldreda, Mildred, and All Holy Nuns – optional memorial
    9 July – Our Lady of the Atonement – optional memorial
    30 August – Saints Margaret Clitherow, Anne Line, and Margaret Ward, martyrs – optional memorial
    31 August – Saint Aidan, bishop, and the Saints of Lindisfarne, optional memorial
    4 September – Saint Cuthbert, bishop – optional memorial
    19 September – Saint Theodore of Canterbury, bishop, or Saint Adrian, abbot – optional memorial
    24 September – Our Lady of Walsingham, patroness of the ordinariate – feast
    8 October – Saint Denis and companions, martyrs or Saint John Leonardi, priest – optional memorial (9 October in the General Calendar)
    9 October – Blessed John Henry Newman, priest – optional memorial
    12 October – Saint Wilfrid, optional memorial
    13 October – Saint Edward the Confessor – optional memorial
    20 November – Saint Edmund, martyr – optional memorial

And we've discussed the Quo primum issue to death here before. Pope Benedict can approve whatever new rites he wants, since he was the Pope at the time.
I think that if BXVI hadn't been forced out (my opinion only) the ordinariate mass would have supplanted the NO.

It is, by miles, far superior to the most reverent NO mass I have ever been to.
You guys are being silly. The Ordinariate is a wonderful organization
That has helped bring many into the Church. The Church had English rites before the Reformation. If we can have Eastern Catholics, why not English Catholics?
(06-26-2018, 08:30 PM)JEvolian18 Wrote: [ -> ]If we can have Eastern Catholics, why not English Catholics?

Because I said no!!!!
(06-26-2018, 09:22 AM)Paul Wrote: [ -> ]The seasonal calendar is the same as Sarum, which includes Septuagesima and counts Sundays after Trinity rather than after Pentecost. And there are plenty of Catholic English and British saints that aren't in the General Roman Calendar. According to Wikipedia, it includes these saints. I don't see an Anglican among them.
    
    31 August – Saint Aidan, bishop, and the Saints of Lindisfarne, optional memorial
Good point, Paul. Of course there are no Anglicans among them despite what Mr Williams implies on his blog. The Ordinariates are Catholic and only honour Catholic Saints.

BTW, here's the Martyrology for 31 August from Divinum Officium:
Quote:August 31st anno Domini 2018 The 20th Day of the Moon were born into the better life: 

In England, [in the year 651,] holy Aidan, Bishop of Lindisfarne. Holy Cuthbert, who was then a shepherd lad, saw the soul of Aidan carried up into heaven, and he thereupon left his sheep and became a monk. 

They have added 'the Saints of Lindisfarne' on this day, of whom there are several, including those of 8 June 793 AD, of which Alcuin wrote, 'Never before has such terror appeared in Britain as we have now suffered from a pagan race ... The heathens poured out the blood of saints around the altar, and trampled on the bodies of saints in the temple of God, like dung in the streets.' St Aidan is not in the General Roman Calendar. 


Quote:At Cardona, in Spain, [in the year 1240,] the holy Confessor Cardinal Raymond, surnamed the Unborn, of the Order of Blessed Mary of Ransom for the Redemption of Prisoners, a man famous for the holiness of his life, and for his wondrous works, whose feast we keep upon the first day of September. 
 St Raymond Nonnatus, however, is in the General Roman Calendar.
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