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How does one acquire the desire for holiness?   

Is this a grace of Baptism?   And is it restored through Confession?

Trying to help my husband out and not sure it is something that could just be prayed for . . .
Everything is a gift from God, waking up in the morning, food on the table, ability to work to earn a living, graces etc and can be requested from God. So, yes, the desire for holiness or grace of holiness can be prayed for; one example of this is St Louis de Montfort's method of saying the rosary which requests a grace for each mystery.

For example in the attached file here is an example using the Crucifixion


Tenth decade

We offer you, Lord Jesus, this tenth decade in honour of your Crucifixion on Mount Calvary. Through this mystery and the intercession of your holy Mother we ask for a great horror of sin, a love for the Cross and the grace of a holy death for us and for those who are now in their last agony.

Our Father, ten Hail Marys, Glory be to the Father.

May the grace of the Death and Passion of Our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ come into me and make me truly holy.

Methods for Saying Methods for Saying the Rosary
I agree with the Capn.  I have been struggling with this effort for decades.  I found that Living a holy life starts with a commitment to conduct our lives in a manner that rejects the pitfalls of the world.  For some, like myself, this involves a complete lifestyle change, by removing the sources of vice and lust which are self destructive, along with the more subtle actions like cutting out profanity, avoiding the superficial leudness which infects daily life, keeping Sunday holy, and being merciful and just in your day to day encounters with people.  Then, by supplementing your life with prayer and devotion, and regular reception of the sacraments,  we become holier as we conform to how god wants us to live our lives. So perhaps you can bring about some small changes for starters in your husbands life to get him started down the right road.

The rosary is an overwhelming source of abundant graces. I found a special devotion to St Joseph, so I say prayers to St Joseph recurringly for my family troubles, and while every day has its challenges and spiritual minefields, Im getting by.
(07-23-2018, 10:56 PM)SEDLIBERANOSAMALO Wrote: [ -> ]How does one acquire the desire for holiness?   

Is this a grace of Baptism?   And is it restored through Confession?

Trying to help my husband out and not sure it is something that could just be prayed for . . .

The desire for holiness.  Yes, that is key.

Not many actually desire it.  Most desire happiness.

The irony is, that without holiness you will never really have happiness.

The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and often it takes a great trial or near death to gain this fear.

Your suffering is an opportunity for many graces, and the fact that you are even willing to consider what's good for your husband shows the holiness of your heart.

It's beautiful to hear your desire for his holiness and I'm sure it's a consolation to the heart of Jesus!  Heart

Offering your sufferings for him by uniting them to the Holy Cross will surely help your husband and you to grow in holiness.

Your husband still has free will and may be very stubborn, but you can do what you can for him and you will reap the benefits for yourself in the meantime.

Confession and true contrition, which are the fear of the Lord in action, are the beginnings of that humility which is required in making the first steps towards holiness.
Thank you to everyone for your insight.

I know that I did not always have the desire for holiness . . . and I know I never *specifically* prayed for it. It definitely came after I repented of some major sins and began to live a more Christian life, with increased prayer and mediation, daily Rosary and frequent Confession. Of course, I think the intercession of the saints (as well as the prayers of deliverance) were also possibly instrumental in its appearance. And I am incredibly thankful to God for bestowing it upon me, as it is key as SH said.

Obviously, my husband and I are in way different places spiritually. He is what I call a "Sunday Catholic", meaning going to Mass on Sunday is the extent of his spiritual life. And I understand, because I was this way too, for years, believing that just making an appearance at Mass saved my soul. I rejected Confession, the rosary, belief in the devil and hell, because those were things (to me) that only crazy Catholics do/believe. So I get where he is coming from when he tells me he will never be as "Catholic" as me, that he will never get anything out of Latin Mass, that he never sees himself as a traditional Catholic. He thinks he is devout just because he shows up to Mass, and is clearly not concerned about his soul, because he feels only terrible people go to Hell (and unrepentant adulterers don't apparently fall into that category). And of course, the NO parish that he attends, while somewhat conservative, does not really do anything to challenge his perceptions. Oh, the fruits of Vatican II!

He has expressed to me that he will do whatever it takes to change, that he wants to keep our marriage and family intact. I am going to insist that he develop a stronger spiritual life as a condition to our reconciliation. And although he told me he hates Confession (the demons at work I tell you) he did tell me he would go. So it is a start. But in the meantime, I will pray that God grant him this desire for holiness, among many other things.
(07-24-2018, 06:04 PM)SEDLIBERANOSAMALO Wrote: [ -> ]Thank you to everyone for your insight.

I know that I did not always have the desire for holiness . . . and I know I never *specifically* prayed for it.  It definitely came after I repented of some major sins and began to live a more Christian life, with increased prayer and mediation, daily Rosary and frequent Confession.  Of course, I think the intercession of the saints (as well as the prayers of deliverance) were also possibly instrumental in its appearance.  And I am incredibly thankful to God for bestowing it upon me, as it is key as SH said.

Obviously, my husband and I are in way different places spiritually.   He is what I call a "Sunday Catholic", meaning going to Mass on Sunday is the extent of his spiritual life.   And I understand, because I was this way too, for years, believing that just making an appearance at Mass saved my soul.  I rejected Confession, the rosary, belief in the devil and hell, because those were things (to me) that only crazy Catholics do/believe.  So I get where he is coming from when he tells me he will never be as "Catholic" as me, that he will never get anything out of Latin Mass, that he never sees himself as a traditional Catholic.  He thinks he is devout just because he shows up to Mass, and is clearly not concerned about his soul, because he feels only terrible people go to Hell (and unrepentant adulterers don't apparently fall into that category).   And of course, the NO parish that he attends, while somewhat conservative, does not really do anything to challenge his perceptions.    Oh, the fruits of Vatican II!

He has expressed to me that he will do whatever it takes to change, that he wants to keep our marriage and family intact.  I am going to insist that he develop a stronger spiritual life as a condition to our reconciliation.   And although he told me he hates Confession (the demons at work I tell you) he did tell me he would go.  So it is a start.  But in the meantime, I will pray that God grant him this desire for holiness, among many other things.

I've never been very good at fasting, but I've heard it is a very powerful form of intercession with miraculous results!