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From the the Chicago Sun-Times, my emphasis in bold:




08/02/2018, 07:52pm
Cardinal Cupich wishes Scalia had lived to see pope’s new death penalty teaching
By Adam Thorp
By Rachel Hinton @twitter.com/@rrhinton 
 
Cardinal Blase Cupich said Thursday that he wishes Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia had lived to see Pope Francis say the death penalty is wrong in all cases.

The exchange about Scalia, a conservative Supreme Court justice and devout Catholic who ruled and spoke in favor of the death penalty, capped an exchange on the legal and theological implications of the punishment between Cupich and three legal experts who oppose the death penalty.

The panel discussion, part of the American Bar Association’s annual meeting in Chicago this week, came just hours after Pope Francis announced that the catechism of the Catholic Church would declare the death penalty always “inadmissible”.

Previously, the church had taught that the death penalty could be used in rare instances when no other way of deterring a violent criminal was available.
 
Quote:Um, "the Church" still teaches that. It's only Francis and his useful idiots who don't.
 
Cupich was responding to a Scalia quote read by the panel’s moderator, Ronald J. Tabak, the chair of the ABA’s death penalty committee, in which Scalia suggested that Christian societies, confident in eternal life, tended to be more comfortable with the death penalty than secular societies.

“Would that he had lived to be here today, to see what the pope has done, because I think it would cause him to rethink that,” Cupich said.

Quote:Scalia undoubtedly had a genius-level IQ; he wouldn't have been as easily fooled as Cupich seems to be.
 
I think that his understanding of salvation has great limitations. Its an atomistic view of salvation, that is, as individuals,” Cupich said. “God saves a people. God doesn’t just save by individuals. How is it that we integrate human beings into society, especially those at the margins? That’s the question we should be posing here.”

Quote:We're judged individually. Seriously, it this Bishop saying something different than that? Am I missing something?
 
Cupich’s concerns about the implications of the death penalty for social justice jibed with the concerns of the legal experts, who described a justice system that preyed on those least likely to get a fair trial, including the mentally ill and racial minorities.

Quote:If the phrase "social justice" would disappear tomorrow, I'd be thrilled. Same with that tedious "accompanying" rhetoric.
 
The waning ranks of death row inmates are filled with “the most vulnerable, not the worst of the worst,” said Robert Dunham, the executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center.

Quote:Golly, if the folks on death row don't tend to be the worst of the worst, then who is? Oh, I know: Catholic "integralists"!
 
Cupich said he believed that the church’s categorical opposition to the death penalty could reinforce  its teaching on abortion.

Quote:Francis's blatherings aren't "the Church's." And since when did American Bishops, as a group, care about abortion?
 
“Erasing the innate value of individual lives because of crimes committed, and removing such criminals from the human family, is an echo of the violence done to human dignity when pro-choice advocates imply that the life developing in the womb is not ‘real human’ life,” Cupich said.

Quote:Because an innocent unborn baby is the same as a Muslim suicide bomber.
 
Cupich and his fellow panelists discussed death row “volunteers,” who decline appeals and go willingly to their executions. Cupich encountered such a case as the bishop of Rapid City, South Dakota.

“He wanted to die, his life was so terrible. When I spoke about it, I said, what we have here isn’t the death penalty. We have state-assisted suicide,” Cupich said.

Cupich said he understood some Catholics would struggle with the church’s teaching on the death penalty due to “a desire to restore the order of justice that has been so viciously violated.”

“But there is a flaw in that way of thinking,” Cupich said. “When the state imposes the death penalty, it proclaims that taking one human life counterbalances the taking of another life. This is profoundly mistaken.”

Quote:Yeah, that's the thought behind the Church's actual teaching on the death penalty. Eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth. Yup. He nailed it. Buh-ruther.





Christopher Scalia's response here, in a tweet:  https://twitter.com/cjscalia/status/1025565897895956480
Oh how I wish Scalia was here to put these snakes in their place.
When Cupich became Archbishop of Chicago, his introductory letter focused almost exclusively on "the poor."  He want on, and on about "the poor."  That sounded awfully familiar- that was the rhetoric of my diocese from the late 1970's to 2005.  In 2005, we got a new, faithful bishop who Francis eventually sacked.  I will take the Faith of Justice Scalia, of his son, a faithful priest, over Cupich and Francis who speak of the things of God and of those who love Him like one of the first apostles, who rebuked Mary Magdalene's lavish expression of love for Our Lord by saying to her "why this waste?  This could have been sold for a hundred pence and the money given to the poor."  Mary Magdalene's gift was indeed a lavish one- a lavish gift of thanks and love from one who was forgiven much to one who forgave much, and Judas belittled it.  The same is true of wolves like Cupich and Francis.
I am not challenging the current teaching on the death penalty (pre-Francis' weekly bit), but there are groups in the US that work to appeal imprisonment and death penalty cases for those they truly believe are innocent, usually using DNA.
.
The conservative columnist Michelle Malkin has a website (google Michelle Malkin) and you can get to the info - it is a valid cause because in the US, we started with the idea that it is better to let a guilty man go than to imprison an innocent man ( a rejection of British ways).  Attachments and links are not my strongpoint  (apparently the iPhone isn't, either).
I am not opposed to such a project. No one wants to see an innocent man die. But, given Francis's opposition to life imprisonment, what is the alternative? Give a killer a slap on the wrist, and release him to kill again?
(08-06-2018, 02:59 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]I am not opposed to such a project. No one wants to see an innocent man die. But, given Francis's opposition to life imprisonment, what is the alternative? Give a killer a slap on the wrist, and release him to kill again?

But Jovan! Wouldn't that be the "merciful" thing to do? I mean who am I to judge? He probably didn't mean to kill all those people.
(08-06-2018, 03:14 AM)Dominicus Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-06-2018, 02:59 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]I am not opposed to such a project. No one wants to see an innocent man die. But, given Francis's opposition to life imprisonment, what is the alternative? Give a killer a slap on the wrist, and release him to kill again?

But Jovan! Wouldn't that be the "merciful" thing to do? I mean who am I to judge? He probably didn't mean to kill all those people.

LOL LOL LOL