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It's well known that Catholics aren't allowed to have a wedding Mass/get married in parks, under a tree, on the beach, etc.

The argument is always that Marriage is a sacrament and must be celebrated in God's house, in His presence.

This weekend, my local parish had Mass in one of the city parks with a picnic afterwards.

This doesn't make sense to me. If we can't get married in a park, we shouldn't be able to have Mass there, right?

Thoughts?
My question would be, "why are they having Mass in the park"?
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To ensure that the Faithful receive the sacrament, or to make the picnic more convenient?
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When I was a kid we would go canoeing over the weekends and Father would come out to the campsite to say Mass, but it was done in a reverent way.
Mass must happen in a sacred edifice (a consecrated or blessed church or oratory), unless there is a reasonable cause for not doing this. It must then be done in a fitting place. (Canon 932 §1) Canon Law in fact says "unless necessity requires otherwise" Mass must be said in a church.

Think of the SSPX Ordinations which occur in outdoor tents because there are no churches large enough at the seminaries or Masses for camps and pilgrimages which cannot always be held in a church.

There still has to be a justified reason. A parish deciding to have a Mass and picnic afterward doesn't seem a good reason, seeing as one could have a Mass in the church building, then go to the park afterward with little ill-effect on the participation.

The same goes for Sacraments. Ideally all are conferred in a church. Obviously, some are more likely to admit of exceptions, like Extreme Unction, Confession, or Communion, which are given to the sick in the hospital or in their homes during sick calls. Still, when possible, these are all to be done in the church. If a man is diagnosed with serious cancer that could be incurable, he is fittingly anointed soon after the diagnosis and in the church if he can come, rather than wait for the disease to progress.
(09-10-2018, 08:19 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]Mass must happen in a sacred edifice (a consecrated or blessed church or oratory), unless there is a reasonable cause for not doing this. It must then be done in a fitting place. (Canon 932 §1) Canon Law in fact says "unless necessity requires otherwise" Mass must be said in a church.

Think of the SSPX Ordinations which occur in outdoor tents because there are no churches large enough at the seminaries or Masses for camps and pilgrimages which cannot always be held in a church.

There still has to be a justified reason. A parish deciding to have a Mass and picnic afterward doesn't seem a good reason, seeing as one could have a Mass in the church building, then go to the park afterward with little ill-effect on the participation.

The same goes for Sacraments. Ideally all are conferred in a church. Obviously, some are more likely to admit of exceptions, like Extreme Unction, Confession, or Communion, which are given to the sick in the hospital or in their homes during sick calls. Still, when possible, these are all to be done in the church. If a man is diagnosed with serious cancer that could be incurable, he is fittingly anointed soon after the diagnosis and in the church if he can come, rather than wait for the disease to progress.
Why does the sspx have such small churches? It seems like they're all overflowing.
(09-10-2018, 09:11 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote: [ -> ]Why does the sspx have such small churches? It seems like they're all overflowing.

I'd imagine partially because they get whatever buildings they're able, but also because the number of people desiring the traditional sacraments will likely outsize the building, no matter how large it is.  Unlike the new rite where it's split between dozens of parishes, for the old rite it's funnelled into one or two in the whole area.
(09-10-2018, 09:11 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-10-2018, 08:19 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]Mass must happen in a sacred edifice (a consecrated or blessed church or oratory), unless there is a reasonable cause for not doing this. It must then be done in a fitting place. (Canon 932 §1) Canon Law in fact says "unless necessity requires otherwise" Mass must be said in a church.

Think of the SSPX Ordinations which occur in outdoor tents because there are no churches large enough at the seminaries or Masses for camps and pilgrimages which cannot always be held in a church.

There still has to be a justified reason. A parish deciding to have a Mass and picnic afterward doesn't seem a good reason, seeing as one could have a Mass in the church building, then go to the park afterward with little ill-effect on the participation.

The same goes for Sacraments. Ideally all are conferred in a church. Obviously, some are more likely to admit of exceptions, like Extreme Unction, Confession, or Communion, which are given to the sick in the hospital or in their homes during sick calls. Still, when possible, these are all to be done in the church. If a man is diagnosed with serious cancer that could be incurable, he is fittingly anointed soon after the diagnosis and in the church if he can come, rather than wait for the disease to progress.
Why does the sspx have such small churches? It seems like they're all overflowing.

I'd imagine it's a combination of demand, money and the cost of building.

First : money. Diocese are relatively well off both in resources and in a monetary base. If a parish is suffering, the diocese can shift resources until it's a hopeless battle. They also receive lots of money from various activities, the rental of halls and buildings, and schools. Even when the numbers are declining, they have an asset base which is significant, and can be used as a revenue stream. In some cases they also have a significant endowment.

For Ecclesia Dei groups, a diocese can easily arrange a disused church from among those assets, meaning little capital cost. Even if it's in need of renovation, that's a significant savings.

Traddies tend to be middle- to lower-class. There are exceptions, but this means there are few regular big benefactors in a place.

Second : churches are expensive capital investments. A 500-person new brick or stone church build in a simple, but traditional style would vary, but would easily be $10 million. That's a huge chunk of change. A better investment is to find a disused church, but then options are pretty limited. One can save money in construction or in land. Often the latter is very expensive as well, leading to new building being well outside the cities, and thus a lower demand and smaller size.

Third : growth is usually exponential. Planning a church that fits now with some extra space, but can be afforded now, is always problem.

Fourthly : Most diocese at least in the U.S. place encumbrances on the deeds specifically so the SSPX cannot buy a disused church, limiting buying options. Look at the Pittsburgh, PA SSPX story for details on that.

Finally, demand for the traditional Mass varies. Sometimes it's large, sometimes it's only a few. There's also the competing traditionalist problem. Originally the SSPX was invited in by faithful, and the diocese replied by condemnations and then the FSSP leading to two chapels competing for limited resources, and people going back and forth. Then demand can vary greatly. If a school is started it may attract a great number of people that were not there when the church was purchased or built, meaning a crunch.
Well, when I was in college I went to mass at Yankee stadium when Benedict was Pope. It happens I guess....
The first Mass said on what is now called North America, was said out in the open near a bay, by the water, at what is now St. Augustine, Fl. Of course, the Spanish Franciscan Padres had no church yet, just a very rough encampment the soldiers set up, but the spot is commemorated with an Altar at the site, to this day. I suppose that's be special enough a reason to say Mass outdoors.