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My uncle's wife (my aunt) passed away two months ago of cancer.  She was only 53.  

I just spoke with my uncle, and he's going through the grieving process.  Even though they knew my aunt had cancer, she was on the mend and her death came rather abruptly.  My uncle told me that he's been reading several books on grieving, and that seems to be helping.

I would like to get him a book (or article) on grieving from a Catholic perspective.  I searched the main Fish Eaters site, but didn't find anything that appeared on topic. 

Suggestions? 

Thanks in advance.
I don't have a good answer for you, but hate that no one's replied. All I can think of is not books, but maybe a devotion to Mary's 7 Sorrows... If your Uncle is feeling angry or if he lacks trust in God's goodness, this page might help him: https://www.fisheaters.com/trustingingod.html  

Wish I knew of a decent book, but alas... I pray he receives all the consolation he needs.
I havnt read it but perhaps "the Problem of Pain" by CS Lewis. A Grief Observed is good as well but not for the faint of heart.
Many parishes/diocese have grief support groups for those who have lost a spouse.
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Some are great groups that help the members get thru the immediate trauma and help them start to live again - going out for lunch or dinner with a group, going for a walk in the park with a group, going to someone's house for a pot luck.  The group needs to be patient, let someone cry, and help that someone start to laugh again.  You can also check with the local hospital for such a group.
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But be careful.  Occasionally you will find a group that considers itself to be a place of matchmaking, which is not what a grieving spouse needs.  Attention from the opposite sex can be nice at some point, but too soon and you don't finish grieving.  This is a question you should ask upfront when you call about meeting times, etc.
(09-11-2018, 11:06 PM)Dominicus Wrote: [ -> ]I havnt read it but perhaps "the Problem of Pain" by CS Lewis. A Grief Observed is good as well but not for the faint of heart.

I was going to recommend both, but whilst Lewis was a High Church Anglican he was not actually a Catholic. However, they are excellent in the case described.
(09-12-2018, 12:43 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(09-11-2018, 11:06 PM)Dominicus Wrote: [ -> ]I havnt read it but perhaps "the Problem of Pain" by CS Lewis. A Grief Observed is good as well but not for the faint of heart.

I was going to recommend both, but whilst Lewis was a High Church Anglican he was not actually a Catholic. However, they are excellent in the case described.

Yes. Truly a shame that he never actually converted but while he was never a Catholic many of his ideas definitely were.
Thanks all. 

And no, my uncle isn't angry at the moment.  I was just concerned because the books he told me he was reading weren't what I would recommend.  One was by Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook.  Not only is she, um, not Catholic, but she helps run one of the most diabolical companies in the world!  

Doh!

Not one I would take advice from.

I thought there had to be better resources out there.
(09-12-2018, 02:12 AM)Dominicus Wrote: [ -> ]Yes. Truly a shame that he never actually converted but while he was never a Catholic many of his ideas definitely were.

Tolkien was instrumental in bringing Lewis back to Christianity. It was his great regret that he was never able to bring him home to Christ's Church. However, given Lewis's upbringing in the violently anti-Catholic Church of Ireland, some commentators have suggested that at least subconsciously he thought that 'Paping' would be treasonous to his family and his people.
It appears there is a need for good Catholic books on this subject! I didn't respond because my recommendation isn't Catholic, isn't even Christian, but since others gave theirs I'll give mine. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion. She might be called a halfway noble pagan. Her husband died of a heart attack right in front of her, rather sudden even though they knew he had heart issues. It's a good general book about the grieving process, especially for one who lost a spouse.
Arise from Darkness is something I started reading. It's a book by Fr. Benedict Groeschel. I think it's a good Catholic book that's very sympathetic at dealing with pain.