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Does God hear my prayers for myself and/or for others if I'm in a state of mortal sin? Or is there no way I can obtain grace for others since I'm not privy to it myself?
(01-01-2019, 07:47 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does God hear my prayers for myself and/or for others if I'm in a state of mortal sin? Or is there no way I can obtain grace for others since I'm not privy to it myself?

If God can't hear your prayers when you are in a state of mortal sin, and can only hear them after you have confessed, then you have greater power than God.  That would be heresy.
(01-01-2019, 08:59 PM)Melkite Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-01-2019, 07:47 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does God hear my prayers for myself and/or for others if I'm in a state of mortal sin? Or is there no way I can obtain grace for others since I'm not privy to it myself?

If God can't hear your prayers when you are in a state of mortal sin, and can only hear them after you have confessed, then you have greater power than God.  That would be heresy.

He obviously "hears" them, but that's not really what Melkite is asking. He is asking whether or not God will grant his request in such a state and my understanding is that He will not. When you are in a state of mortal sin you can merit nothing and therefore cannot merit grace for others.

Your first obligation is to save your own soul. If you are in a state of mortal sin, pray for contrition and go to confession as quickly as possible. Then help others Smile
(01-01-2019, 07:47 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does God hear my prayers for myself and/or for others if I'm in a state of mortal sin? Or is there no way I can obtain grace for others since I'm not privy to it myself?
You do know that an Act of Contrition and a resolve to confess ASAP restores the State of Grace?
I've posted this quote in a similar thread a while ago but it's worth repeating. It's from Father Garrigou Lagrange - the great Thomist theologian of the 20th century - in his work The Three Ages of the Interior Life.

"From the depths of the abyss into which it has fallen and where it can no longer merit, the most wretched soul may utter that cry to the divine mercy, which is prayer. The abyss of wretchedness calls to that of mercy, abyssus abyssum invocat, and if the sinner puts his whole heart into this appeal, he will be heard. His soul will be lifted up, and God will be glorified, as was the case with Magdalen. The impetrating power of prayer does not presuppose the state of grace, whereas merit does."
I understand your prayers for contrition and mercy would be efficacious to help restore you to a state of grace (i.e. to help you give a sincere and entire confession), but wouldn’t merit anything other than that (e.g. prayers for other people).
That’s one of the countless reasons to avoid mortal sin at all costs.
(01-02-2019, 10:06 AM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]I understand your prayers for contrition and mercy would be efficacious to help restore you to a state of grace (i.e. to help you give a sincere and entire confession), but wouldn’t merit anything other than that (e.g. prayers for other people).
That’s one of the countless reasons to avoid mortal sin at all costs.

Take this to its logical conclusion.  If, in a state of mortal sin, you are requesting God to do something for yourself, or someone else, that would actually benefit them, bring them closer to God, etc., a loving God is not going to spurn someone else because you are in a state of mortal sin.  That would make God petty.  You're focusing so much on merit that you're missing God's capacity to love.
I'd say experience shows that God grants many things to people who are in state of mortal sin. God grants things to people in this state in a way to help them see his Goodness and bring them back to Him. How many people have we seen who live wretched lives and in an act of desperation they pray, something good happens and they see God's hand in it, repent, and are converted? Certainly God heard this person's prayers. I'd say that the answer isn't so cut and dry, but I'm no theologian. 

Basically, it's understandable that no merit is gained from any good works when in a state of mortal sin and that one should focus their attention on praying for mercy more than anything else. However, if charity compels you to pray for another person or do some good, is God going to disqualify your work? One of the prayers that I tend to use after confession says "thou hast revived the merits of my good works, which were dead through sin," is this only referring to works I did in a state of grace previously? Or everything? I would think that God wouldn't disqualify our good works just because we did them in a state of mortal sin. We may not gain said merit until we repent, but it doesn't make much sense that we would never gain such merit ever just because of the state in which we did them. I'm sure that those who are more theologically inclined that myself would give a better answer, but from my limited mind that's what my common sense view of it.
(01-02-2019, 01:41 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-01-2019, 07:47 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does God hear my prayers for myself and/or for others if I'm in a state of mortal sin? Or is there no way I can obtain grace for others since I'm not privy to it myself?
You do know that an Act of Contrition and a resolve to confess ASAP restores the State of Grace?


*An act of perfect contrition.
(01-01-2019, 07:47 PM)SacraCor714 Wrote: [ -> ]Does God hear my prayers for myself and/or for others if I'm in a state of mortal sin? Or is there no way I can obtain grace for others since I'm not privy to it myself?

Prayers in a State of Mortal like any actions are not meritorious and in no way are directly beneficial towards our salvation : "If I should distribute all my goods to feed the poor, and if I should deliver my body to be burned, and have not Charity, it profits me nothing."

When we pray in the State of Grace we have an indirect claim to graces and favors. Only Christ has the true claim, but because we are conformed to Christ by that State of Grace, we also have some claim. God owes certain things to us, not in Justice, but because of his promises and because of the merits of Jesus Christ. When we pray in the State of Grace, our prayer is infallible if we pray for something necessary for our own salvation, and do so perseveringly and piously, so says St Thomas Aquinas. Infallible means unable to fail, not "immediate".

If we are not in the State of Grace, none of this applies. Our prayers are not infallible, nor can we have any claim to Christ's treasury of grace, since we are not conformed to him.

Prayers in such a state, though are not totally useless. They may dispose us toward receiving actual graces. God may grant the request if it is for our good, but not because he "owes" it to us in some way, but rather on account of his pity for us.

If you find yourself having committed a mortal sin, you should pray, but you should pray for your conversion, the opportunity to make a true and perfect act of contrition, to have the opportunity to confess your sins, and to also have the grace necessary to do whatever necessary to remove the occasions of sin which caused you to fall in the first place (since that is the resolve necessary for sufficient contrition in confession).
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