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If it snows to the point of making it dangerous to go to morning mass but clears up later in the day for a late mass, are you still obligated to go?
I live in an area where we get some nasty snowstorms.  The question in the immediate aftermath of a snowstorm is "how bad are the roads right now?"  In my area, the city and the county seldom have enough money these days to plow and salt more than a few main roads.  If the storm has been bad, the roads are usually unsafe for at least a day or two following the heavy snowfall.  In such a case, if I were too afraid to drive anywhere else on the roads (to the grocery store, to work, etc.), I'd probably conclude that driving even to Mass would be too dangerous.  Also, the type of vehicle you drive might be factored in.  If I had a four-wheel drive truck, it might be less concerning.  I drive an old Honda Accord.  A stout wind will rattle that car.  So, I'd suggest you try to find out how safe your roads are right now for travel.  Well plowed, no icy spots or stretches?  Icy, covered in multiple inches of snow?  With that type of information in mind, do you think you can safely drive to Mass in your vehicle?
(01-27-2019, 11:01 AM)SeekerofChrist Wrote: [ -> ]I live in an area where we get some nasty snowstorms.  The question in the immediate aftermath of a snowstorm is "how bad are the roads right now?"  In my area, the city and the county seldom have enough money these days to plow and salt more than a few main roads.  If the storm has been bad, the roads are usually unsafe for at least a day or two following the heavy snowfall.  In such a case, if I were too afraid to drive anywhere else on the roads (to the grocery store, to work, etc.), I'd probably conclude that driving even to Mass would be too dangerous.  Also, the type of vehicle you drive might be factored in.  If I had a four-wheel drive truck, it might be less concerning.  I drive an old Honda Accord.  A stout wind will rattle that car.  So, I'd suggest you try to find out how safe your roads are right now for travel.  Well plowed, no icy spots or stretches?  Icy, covered in multiple inches of snow?  With that type of information in mind, do you think you can safely drive to Mass in your vehicle?

I drove last week in the snow and it was a little bit risky. This morning google maps showed a crash on the route. I don't know what the roads will be like, but my own side street has about 15cm/6" of snow.
The problem with these questions is you get everyone giving their own two cents and confusing you.  If you have an email for a good traditional priest or Bishop I’d email them instead.  Otherwise you’ll just have everyone saying “well, in my opinion..” and then cite nothing and just leave you wrestling with your own conscience as you try to figure out the truth.
Actually, FultonFan does make a good point.  I decided to do a Google search and see what I could find from any traditional Catholic sources out there.  Personally, I trust the SSPX and I found this on their American website: 

Quote:The Sunday precept in general

From the beginning of the Christian era, it was the norm to sanctify feast days by the attendance at Mass. Why was this? To show by a public worship that we acknowledge the sovereignty of God over all things and, in consequence, our total dependence on Him. Such a duty was, however, at first, of a customary character. It did not become obligatory until, the year 506 A.D. through a provision of the Council of Agde.[3] This decree of a particular council was later transformed by custom into a universal law.

One satisfies the duty of attending Sunday Mass by a conscious participation[4] in the whole of the Sacrifice, it being understood that this same Mass is celebrated in the Catholic Rite. This precept binds "subgravi" (i.e., under pain of mortal sin) all those who have reached the age of reason, i.e., seven years old.[5] But one can be excused from attending Mass in the case of impossibility
resulting from:

  • illness,

  • distance (estimated at about one hour's journey),

  • from the fear of grave inconvenience (e.g., the shame of a pregnant girl out of wedlock),

  • grave danger (e.g., traveling under dangerous conditions such as icy roads),

  • or from charity towards one's neighbors (e.g., a mother looking after her children), etc.

It can be found in this article: http://sspx.org/en/attendance-todays-sunday-masses.  Please note, I am NOT trying to open this into a discussion on the wider topic in that article, but I think this quoted section is useful to the OP.
(01-27-2019, 10:32 AM)For Petes Sake Wrote: [ -> ]If it snows to the point of making it dangerous to go to morning mass but clears up later in the day for a late mass, are you still obligated to go?

You answered your own question already.  If the roads are clear for mass later in the day are you obliged to go?  The answer would be yes.  Just because the roads are snowy for one mass but not another does not mean you are excused from your Sunday Obligation.  Just saying because 1 mass during that day can not be got to but the parish offers other masses throughout the day does not mean missing mass is ok just because a person "PREFERS" to go to morning mass.
(01-27-2019, 11:01 AM)SeekerofChrist Wrote: [ -> ]I live in an area where we get some nasty snowstorms.  The question in the immediate aftermath of a snowstorm is "how bad are the roads right now?"  In my area, the city and the county seldom have enough money these days to plow and salt more than a few main roads.  If the storm has been bad, the roads are usually unsafe for at least a day or two following the heavy snowfall.  In such a case, if I were too afraid to drive anywhere else on the roads (to the grocery store, to work, etc.), I'd probably conclude that driving even to Mass would be too dangerous.  Also, the type of vehicle you drive might be factored in.  If I had a four-wheel drive truck, it might be less concerning.  I drive an old Honda Accord.  A stout wind will rattle that car.  So, I'd suggest you try to find out how safe your roads are right now for travel.  Well plowed, no icy spots or stretches?  Icy, covered in multiple inches of snow?  With that type of information in mind, do you think you can safely drive to Mass in your vehicle?

I think this is a great point that was made.  If the roads are truly to dangerous to drive to mass then that should apply to stores, eateries and work.  I always find it funny the train of thought (no one here has made this claim) that says the roads are to dangerous to go to mass so I can miss mass "but" I have to get to work so I will drive these same roads to make sure I don't miss work.  If you are willing to drive to work or other places on these roads or would be willing if it was a work day, then someone obviously doesn't consider the roads to be that "dangerous."
Roads look decent I'm going to go.
(01-27-2019, 02:14 PM)For Petes Sake Wrote: [ -> ]Roads look decent I'm going to go.

In this case, could you watch Mass on EWTN or a local channel that broadcasts? Could you go Monday morning, assuming roads got plowed/salted btwn Sunday morning and Monday?
The way Fr Hesse used to put it: Sunday obligation is a precept of the Church, so the Church also has an obligation to provide a Mass for you. If there's a Mass and you can get there, you go. If not and it's necessary for you to stay home then you're under no obligation other than to keep Sunday holy.

Where a 7 pm Sunday night last chance to get there NO Mass fits after the roads have been cleared (in in terms of you being obligated), that's complicated. Fr Hesse would say you're not obligated. I personally wouldn't go that far to agree on that with him. You'd have to decide for yourself. For this reason I don't like snowfall on Sundays.
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