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Just been reading about the life of St Ignatious of Loyola when I came across the rule ‘that no Jesuit is to seek or accept high office ie bishopric etc. unless given permission by the Pope’

Is this rule still upheld today? 

If so, how does one rise to the level of Pope as a Jesuit?
(01-30-2019, 06:51 AM)MyLady Wrote: [ -> ]Just been reading about the life of St Ignatious of Loyola when I came across the rule ‘that no Jesuit is to seek or accept high office ie bishopric etc. unless given permission by the Pope’

Is this rule still upheld today? 

If so, how does one rise to the level of Pope as a Jesuit?

From what I understand, Bergoglio was specifically selected by John Paul II.  In other words, he was given permission from the pope to accept his office.  If true, this would be one of many examples of where John Paul II displayed an absolutely dreadful ability to judge character in selecting candidates for bishops.
It is worth noting here that nearly every consistory held by John Paul II involved the elevation of at least one Sankt Gallen or Sankt Gallen-related person to the office of Bishop or to the Cardinalate.
(01-30-2019, 07:34 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-30-2019, 06:51 AM)MyLady Wrote: [ -> ]Just been reading about the life of St Ignatious of Loyola when I came across the rule ‘that no Jesuit is to seek or accept high office ie bishopric etc. unless given permission by the Pope’

Is this rule still upheld today? 

If so, how does one rise to the level of Pope as a Jesuit?

From what I understand, Bergoglio was specifically selected by John Paul II.  In other words, he was given permission from the pope to accept his office.  If true, this would be one of many examples of where John Paul II displayed an absolutely dreadful ability to judge character in selecting candidates for bishops.

I assume you mean that of cardinal?
Reading the Jesuit Constitutions, it is hard to see how a Jesuit could become Pope--who could command under pain of sin a person to be Pope?


Quote:The professed should similarly promise to God our Lord not to seek
any prelacy or dignity outside the Society and, as far as in them lies, not
to consent to being chosen for a similar charge unless they are com- pelled by an order from the one who can command them under pain of
sin.[3]

One reason St. Robert Bellarmine became a Jesuit is to avoid being a prelate--but of course he ended up an Archbishop and Cardinal and he feared he would be elected Pope in the the 1605 and 1621 conclaves, of which he received votes.  The fact that he feared the possibility of having to accept the papacy and that he indeed received votes shows it was not out of the question.  I believe in that case, if the electors insisted, it would be treated as a manifestation of God's will.
(01-30-2019, 05:55 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: [ -> ]Reading the Jesuit Constitutions, it is hard to see how a Jesuit could become Pope--who could command under pain of sin a person to be Pope?

No one, which is why ever since he said he accepted election, I've been convinced that he is a sinfully proud, power hungry man.
(01-30-2019, 06:52 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(01-30-2019, 05:55 PM)SaintSebastian Wrote: [ -> ]Reading the Jesuit Constitutions, it is hard to see how a Jesuit could become Pope--who could command under pain of sin a person to be Pope?

No one, which is why ever since he said he accepted election, I've been convinced that he is a sinfully proud, power hungry man.

Take it with a grain of salt, but according to media reports from 2005 of what was in that leaked cardinal's diary from the conclave of that year, Cardinal Bergoglio consistently tried to dissuade Cardinals from voting for him and said he would not accept the election if he won.  Take with a shaker full of salt, someone who claimed to have read the whole thing told me that Benedict ordered him to accept if he were ever in the position again.  That seems a bit farfetched but I guess its possible.

In any event, putting aside any possible dispositions of Pope Francis in particular, I think obedience to the Church or to God's will for one's life as manifested in the decision of the conclave would allow a Jesuit to be Pope.  Again, St. Robert Bellarmine (whose interior dispositions no one would question), in his autobiography never mentions any conflict with his vows and only says as his reason to avoid it that he saw the papacy "as a most onerous and most perilous task."  Significantly, he says he prayed to the Lord "Mitte quem missurus es" (Exo 4:13...Please send someone else to do it), the words of Moses when Moses begged God to choose someone else.  Ultimately God did choose Moses and he served God in that way, so St. Robert seemed willing to follow that example if it came to that.