FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Assistance requested
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
I'm writing an article/blog post about Catholic Social Teaching. I want to emphasise that VII didn't actually change anything. I know that someone in authority (Paul VI?) said that it was a purely 'pastoral' Council and had no intention of changing or adding to the teaching of the Church. Does someone in the Tank have the exact quote and a citation?

Thanks.
(02-22-2019, 09:11 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]I'm writing an article/blog post about Catholic Social Teaching. I want to emphasise that VII didn't actually change anything. I know that someone in authority (Paul VI?) said that it was a purely 'pastoral' Council and had no intention of changing or adding to the teaching of the Church. Does someone in the Tank have the exact quote and a citation?

Thanks.

Paul VI certainty changed his mind, I think.

Especially if the premise you give is true; that he didn't want to institute significant changes in the Church, then ya, he definitely 'changed his mind' by the end of his papacy. He did, after all, actually set out to institute rather drastic changes in Mother Church. Ones coming directly out of VatII.

Just an observation.
L'Osservatore Romano edition from Jan 21, 1966, publishing the speech of Paul VI from his General Audience, Dec 1, 1966 :

Quote:There are those who ask what authority, what theological qualification, the Council intended to give to its teachings, knowing that it avoided issuing solemn dogmatic definitions backed by the Church's infallible teaching authority. The answer is known by those who remember the conciliar declaration of March 6, 1964, repeated on November 16, 1964. In view of the pastoral nature of the Council, it avoided proclaiming in an extraordinary manner any dogmas carrying the mark of infallibility.

The decree Paul VI mentions is from the Theological Commission on March 6, 1964 :

Quote:Taking conciliar custom into consideration and also the pastoral purpose of the present Council, the sacred Council defines as binding on the Church only those things in matters of faith and morals which it shall openly declare to be binding. The rest of the things which the sacred Council sets forth, inasmuch as they are the teaching of the Church's supreme magisterium, ought to be accepted and embraced by each and every one of Christ's faithful according to the mind of the sacred Council. The mind of the Council becomes known either from the matter treated or from its manner of speaking, in accordance with the norms of theological interpretation.
Thanks, MM.