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Full Version: Has Pope Francis said anything Ex Cathedra?
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Has he?

If not, how does this work?  Does he say “I’m about to speak ex cathedra”?

I feel like I don’t get some of the fundamentals.
Here is an article from EWTN that discusses papal infallibility: https://www.ewtn.com/faith/teachings/papac2.htm.  The last paragraph says this:

Quote:When the Pope (1) intends to teach (2) by virtue of his supreme authority (3) on a matter of faith and morals (4) to the whole Church, he is preserved by the Holy Spirit from error. His teaching act is therefore called "infallible" and the teaching which he articulates is termed "irreformable".

Of course, this article doesn't answer your specific question about Pope Francis's exercise of infallibility but hopefully it can give you an overview of the fundamentals.
(03-02-2019, 12:05 PM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]Has he?

No.
(03-02-2019, 12:05 PM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]Has he?

If not, how does this work?  Does he say “I’m about to speak ex cathedra”?

I feel like I don’t get some of the fundamentals.

It's generally something pronounced in such a way that you know it's a big deal. 

For example,

"The Most Holy Roman Church firmly believes, professes and preaches that none of those existing outside the Catholic Church, not only pagans, but also Jews, and heretics, and schismatics, can ever be partakers of eternal life, but that they are to go into the eternal fire "which was prepared for the devil, and his angels," (Mt. 25:41) unless before death they are joined with Her; and that so important is the unity of this Ecclesiastical Body, that only those remaining within this unity can profit from the sacraments of the Church unto salvation, and that they alone can receive an eternal recompense for their fasts, almsdeeds, and other works of Christian piety and duties of a Christian soldier. No one, let his almsgiving be as great as it may, no one, even if he pour out his blood for the Name of Christ, can be saved unless they abide within the bosom and unity of the Catholic Church." - Pope Eugene IV, Cantate Domino, 1441 (ex cathedra)
(03-02-2019, 12:05 PM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]Has he?

If not, how does this work?  Does he say “I’m about to speak ex cathedra”?

I feel like I don’t get some of the fundamentals.

There's no real formula.  The Pope simply has to indicate he is making a definitive/irreformable judgment, binding on the whole Church, about a revealed truth to be believed with faith (which could be in the form of a condemnation of an opposed heresy) or a truth necessarily connected to revelation to be definitively "held." 

In a nutshell, it is a judgment where there is a consequence for the universal Church's communion with the Apostolic See or vice versa. 

It is a necessary consequence of the permanency of the primacy. The Church as established by Christ has one bishopric and its particular Church (what we commonly think of as a diocese) that are head of the rest. The Church can never lose this element. By divine ordinance, this primacy is fixed in the particular church of Rome.

If this particular church were to separate itself from the rest of the Catholic Church through heresy or schism, the primacy would be lost to the universal Church, and that is impossible. Therefore, it is impossible for the Church of Rome to embrace any error that would rupture its communion with the universal Church. It is likewise impossible, by Christ’s promise, for the whole Church to defect from the faith.

Given all this, the Pope must be infallible in those doctrinal judgments that define the faith of this local church or universal church, that if in error, would either rupture the Church of Rome’s communion with the rest of the Church or cause the entire Church to defect from the faith, since both are impossible.

The First Vatican Council notes the variety of ways such definitions have come about (including in the context of a council when the judgment is made in the Pope's own name like the one in In His Love's post, which was in the context of the Council of Florence):

Quote:The Roman pontiffs, too, as the circumstances of the time or the state of affairs suggested, sometimes by summoning ecumenical councils or consulting the opinion of the Churches scattered throughout the world, sometimes by special synods, sometimes by taking advantage of other useful means afforded by divine providence, defined as doctrines to be held those things which, by God’s help, they knew to be in keeping with Sacred Scripture and the apostolic traditions.
(03-02-2019, 02:58 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-02-2019, 12:05 PM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]Has he?

No.

Some people think he never even had a Cathedra.

(Wouldn't that then make Benedict himself the "ex-Cathedra")

Poor Shrovetide humor, sorry.
(03-04-2019, 03:14 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-02-2019, 02:58 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(03-02-2019, 12:05 PM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]Has he?

No.

Some people think he never even had a Cathedra.

(Wouldn't that then make Benedict himself the "ex-Cathedra")

Poor Shrovetide humor, sorry.
You must now consume a pancake with no cocoa, peanut butter, cinnamon, honey, syrup, molasses, or any other flavoring or topping as penance.

I'm hoping my fiance and I can make some chocolate peanut butter pancakes for Shrove Tuesday. They're actually very low in sugar because we use dark chocolate powder and peanut butter powder. They're very good with a bit of butter on top.
(03-02-2019, 12:05 PM)FultonFan Wrote: [ -> ]Has he?

If not, how does this work?  Does he say “I’m about to speak ex cathedra”?

I feel like I don’t get some of the fundamentals.

Bite your tongue! That would be the living end, literally. If he tried to push more nonsense on us in that way, the Holy Spirit would stop it, please God I trust. Anyway, I doubt he's ever going to be that dogmatic. Too old fashioned.