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Why do i have to be grateful to God for saving me? He created us. I never asked for that. If he did not create us then none of this has to happen. I do not get it at all why people say you have to be grateful for the gift of life. If i were given a choice, i’d never be born. And as to going to hell and purgatory, so basically we were created, not being given a choice, “saved” and now we can also be sent to the two. I will be just fine not being born. I know this might sound a bit off to some but i’m asking this because this has prevented me from whole heartedly practicing my catholic faith. I want to see God as my friend and not my 
This might come of as angst, but hopefully not, as it is far from it. This question itself makes me suffer so much. I do not want to think this way and i wish to see it from a different perspective, and that is why i am asking this. I’ve strived to do what is good and just all through this hell of a life, but i have done it out of my will to not be like those people who hurt others. To be someone who eases pain, instead of becoming the aggressor. I want to be able to do all this out of love for God, instead of being a personal will. Why? It’s because my roots are the catholic faith. It says it is the right thing to do. I know i might not be viewing things welI, as a higher entity will have a better purpose of all this, and i really wish to see that.
(03-22-2019, 12:48 AM)Colei Wrote: [ -> ]Why do i have to be grateful to God for saving me? He created us. I never asked for that. If he did not create us then none of this has to happen. I do not get it at all why people say you have to be grateful for the gift of life. If i were given a choice, i’d never be born. 

Pretty contradictory statements there.

In order to have a choice you need to have existed as a human being, because only human beings (and angels) have the ability to choose anything.

I think you forget why God created you (and everyone else). He created us all to know Him, love Him and serve Him, and by this to reach eternal happiness. He even wishes that we have some degree of this happiness in this life.

That is why we ought to be grateful for the "gift of life". God did not have to create you, or me or anything at all. He is perfectly happy with or without any of Creation, but he did so to share His Goodness with us and to bring us to eternal happiness. For that we ought to be grateful. 

(03-22-2019, 12:48 AM)Colei Wrote: [ -> ]And as to going to hell and purgatory, so basically we were created, not being given a choice, “saved” and now we can also be sent to the two. I will be just fine not being born.

I think you misunderstand Hell and Purgatory if you can say such a thing.

God created men at the beginning destined to live some time on earth, to practice love of Him here, pass a test of that love, and after this be confirmed in Sanctifying Grace and without death be translated to Heaven. Adam decided to choose another means towards what he though would give him happiness, and sinned. He lost for all of us those special gifts given by God to preserve us immortal and make us unable to suffer. Further by this choice he intentionally wounded and disordered Human Nature itself. Thus he did not have these gifts to pass to us. We are born with Original Sin because of the lack of gifts that we ought to have had.

God gives every soul more than enough grace that if they correspond to it they would go straight to heaven and never sin. Unfortunately given our wounded nature, we often do not correspond. We sin.

If we are not sorry for our sins, and thus do not love God, then God is not going to force us to love Him and at the end of our life, having given us everything we need to choose heaven but rejecting it, He sends us exactly where we've chosen : the only place without God (or at least where God is only there in his Power, keeping it in existence). Play time is over, and we refuse to come into the house, so God lets us stay out, but we will remain outside forever, because we will never want to come in. Our will is fixed upon the evil.

If we do love God, but imperfectly, then God brings us to Heaven, but first must purify from us what should have been purified in this life by our sufferings. Play time is over and we've come home, but we're all soiled and dirty when Dad said not to get dirty. So we have a timeout while the clothes are washed. Then we get to come into dinner when all is cleaned up.

If we perfectly love God, then He brings us to Heaven directly.

Clearly, however, by your words you misunderstand what the Church actually, the Truth, teaches about these things. If you don't understand them, you are bound to also develop mistaken ideas about them, and sometimes a very unjust view of God.

(03-22-2019, 12:48 AM)Colei Wrote: [ -> ]I know this might sound a bit off to some but i’m asking this because this has prevented me from whole heartedly practicing my catholic faith. I want to see God as my friend and not my 

Not your what?

God is your Father and your friend. Holy Scripture tells us as much. Where is the issue with you seeing Him as such?

(03-22-2019, 12:48 AM)Colei Wrote: [ -> ]This might come of as angst, but hopefully not, as it is far from it. This question itself makes me suffer so much. I do not want to think this way and i wish to see it from a different perspective, and that is why i am asking this. I’ve strived to do what is good and just all through this hell of a life, but i have done it out of my will to not be like those people who hurt others. To be someone who eases pain, instead of becoming the aggressor. I want to be able to do all this out of love for God, instead of being a personal will. Why? It’s because my roots are the catholic faith. It says it is the right thing to do. I know i might not be viewing things welI, as a higher entity will have a better purpose of all this, and i really wish to see that.

Well then offer it to God.

Just because you enjoy it or get some personal satisfaction out of something doesn't mean it isn't done for God. Just because we have personal motives and goals also doesn't exclude something being done for God.

Sanctity isn't just a long series of sufferings. It's about saying "yes" to those little inspirations of grace and including God in everything you do.

If you are having particular issues, though, parse them out here, explain the real root of your problem, and perhaps we can help.
(03-22-2019, 11:12 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]God is your Father and your friend. Holy Scripture tells us as much. Where is the issue with you seeing Him as such?

I've noticed that this is one of the most difficult things to reconcile for some Christians who get stuck in the Islamic view of God as just waiting for us to slip up and fall into hell.

What always helps me in times of doubt is a pseudo-quote commonly attributed to St. Augustine

I find remarkable solace in meditating on how Christ didn't just agonize in Gethsemane for humanity as a collective, but in His divine will agonized for each one of us in particular. Christ thought of me and my sins specifically as He bore the cross and met His end on Calvary.

That knowledge provides the image of a God who loves us, not one who actively seeks to damn us.

Have faith in God's will, hope in Christ's mercy, and charity will follow. I highly recommend the Divine Mercy devotion in times of sorrow.[Image: 0a9b9fe52e9ef0a18635c86c71cc49eb.jpg]
[Image: e937a23f593f0713bf5ff4694cebe6b2.jpg]
(03-22-2019, 12:48 AM)Colei Wrote: [ -> ]If i were given a choice, i’d never be born.

Do you wish nothing existed? Do you wish your mother, father, best friend, wife, dog, favorite cat, the sea, the stars, flowers, the world itself didn't exist? Taken to its logical conclusion, you seem to be saying you wish nothing existed at all. If it's good that they exist, it's good that you exist.

Existence is good, the foundational good. God refers to Himself as "I AM," which I consider profound. Though complete in Himself, He created the world out of love, and created you for Love. These things are all good. It's pure bounty. 

I wonder if you have a problem with depression... If you do, stay prayed-up and get some help with that. Don't suffer needlessly!
Antinatalism, the idea that existence has negative value, and that it is better not to have been born at all, is an idea that goes back to ancient Greece, where it was attributed to wise men and reverberates throughout the learned tradition. The wisdom of Silenus, forced to disclose his wisdom to Midas, was this (so Aristotle):

"It is best not to be born at all; and next to that, it is better to die than to live; and this is confirmed even by divine testimony."

David Benatar, a South African philosopher, explores this at great length in his book Better Never to Have Been: The Harm of Coming into Existence.

Personally, I would be inclined to agree, were it not for my faith. The human being, unique among all creatures, is burdened with cares and worries, a past that anguishes us, a future that we must take pains to provide for, or before which we feel powerless. We know our own insufficiency, in a way animals cannot, and we yearn for something that we are scarcely able to name, and which can never be satisfied.

As much as we might try, we can never really be like the animals, even if we wanted to; we are alienated from the immediacy of being by our faculties of reason, and so we are deprived from the full richness of emotional life and physical existence in nature (as animals have). We are trapped in language and are held hostage by a deafening internal monologue, which makes us so unlike the untroubled condition of wild animals, who in many respects may well seem to enjoy a better lot than man.

Yet the mystery of the Incarnation is a testament that human life is, at its basic level, good. It is so good, in fact, that God, the summit of perfection, can enter into the human condition and reconcile it fully with the divine. God did not dwell in animal life, except insofar as man contains the whole of animal life in his humanity, but in man in his full sense, in his sojourn through this vale of tears.