FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: Veiling during the Triduum
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
What was the tradition for women wearing the mantilla during the Triduum back when it was in canon law? My wife is getting all kinds of claims that she’s not supposed to veil on Good Friday or at the Easter Vigil. That’s strikes me as very weird.
(04-19-2019, 07:33 PM)McNider Wrote: [ -> ]What was the tradition for women wearing the mantilla during the Triduum back when it was in canon law? My wife is getting all kinds of claims that she’s not supposed to veil on Good Friday or at the Easter Vigil. That’s strikes me as very weird.

There's a term for what she is being told. It is called BS. My wife veiled at the NO Good Friday Passion Mass along with a few other women.

Edit: misread your question. I realize you were asking specifics of the 1917 code.
(04-21-2019, 12:13 AM)redneckpride4ever Wrote: [ -> ]NO Good Friday Passion Mass

"Celebration of the Passion of the Lord".

Not sure if that's better or worse than "Solemn Afternoon Liturgical Action".
(04-21-2019, 12:13 AM)redneckpride4ever Wrote: [ -> ]My wife veiled at the NO Good Friday Passion Mass ...

Good Friday remains the only day in the year on which Mass is not celebrated in the Roman Rite.
(04-21-2019, 12:30 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-21-2019, 12:13 AM)redneckpride4ever Wrote: [ -> ]My wife veiled at the NO Good Friday Passion Mass ...

Good Friday remains the only day in the year on which Mass is not celebrated in the Roman Rite.

I didn't realize that. But I thought veiling was mandatory throughout the Latin Church. Was it specific to the Roman Rite? The question was: are women not supposed to veil? New one to me.

Struck me as odd since my mother had to veil consistently in the 40s and 50s, and if she wasn't supposed to veil it would likely be something she would have remembered, being a quite unique shake up from the norm.
Until 1983, the Code of Canon Law of the Latin Rite required women to veil in Church.
(04-21-2019, 01:50 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]Until 1983, the Code of Canon Law of the Latin Rite required women to veil in Church.

The common practice was when the Blessed Sacrament was present, when praying privately in the Church, or when any liturgical action was attended, women should veil.

If the women were helping clean the Church on Good Friday morning when there is no altar Cross, nor any Blessed Sacrament, it does not seem necessary to veil, but there is nothing wrong with it.
(04-21-2019, 05:40 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-21-2019, 01:50 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]Until 1983, the Code of Canon Law of the Latin Rite required women to veil in Church.

The common practice was when the Blessed Sacrament was present, when praying privately in the Church, or when any liturgical action was attended, women should veil.

If the women were helping clean the Church on Good Friday morning when there is no altar Cross, nor any Blessed Sacrament, it does not seem necessary to veil, but there is nothing wrong with it.

Ok, so the 1917 code stated veiling in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament, not simply entering a church. I would guess then that there was no prohibition on veiling sans the True Presence.

In other words, if the 1917 code had been in effect, my wife would have had to veil on Friday when if she entered the sacristy, but could remove it in the nave until the Sacrament was brought out.
(04-21-2019, 09:41 AM)redneckpride4ever Wrote: [ -> ]In other words, if the 1917 code had been in effect, my wife would have had to veil on Friday when if she entered the sacristy, but could remove it in the nave until the Sacrament was brought out.

The 1917 code required a headcovering "when they assist at the sacred rites", but "especially when they approach the Lord's table".

Can 1262 §2. Viri in ecclesia vel extra ecclesiam, dum sacris ritibus assistunt, nudo capite sint, nisi aliud ferant probati populorum mores aut peculiaria rerum adiuncta; mulieres autem, capite cooperto et modeste vestitae, maxime cum ad mensam Dominicam accedunt.

That's less than what Scripture requires, with St Paul saying, "But every woman praying or prophesying with her head not covered, disgraceth her head". (1 Cor 11, 5).

The Good Friday liturgy, while not a Mass, is a sacred rite, and required a headcovering - note that it's a headcovering, not necessarily a veil, even though that's often the custom now. Hats are also acceptable.
I'm not really sure about NO churches, but in traditional chapels on Good Friday, the Blessed Sacrament resides in the Altar of Repose. In other words, He is still there, even if there's no Mass; even if not in the main tabernacle front and center over the main altar.
Pages: 1 2