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Hello friends,
This is charbel13, and I am a 29 year old woman searching for the right Monastery or convent.  I’m looking for a community that prays the divine office and reads the Bible often.  
There is one problem however.  I do rely on one psychotropic medication to get by, and I can’t go without it.  Other than that I am ready for Ora eat Labora!  Could any of you point me in the right direction??? I am very stable on my med.
Thank you!
Didn't you also post looking for a Catholic man?  Which vocation is it?
(04-27-2019, 07:14 PM)Fontevrault Wrote: [ -> ]Didn't you also post looking for a Catholic man?  Which vocation is it?
I think she's trying to discern that. She mentioned that she was considering the religious life in the other post.
I am not sure what the daily regimen is for these Poor Clare Nuns at Our Lady of Solitude Monastery in Arizona, but I have been contributing to the building of their monastery for some years now. The Abbess, Reverend Mother Marie André, has sent me notes quite often. I find them a delightful group of women. Perhaps you will as well.


:comp:
Diseases requiring psychotropic medication are considered an impediment to a religious or priestly vocation.

If the disease cannot be cured such that medication is not necessary, then you do not have a religious vocation, plain and simple.

If the disease can be cured, so medication is not needed, it is still likely that few if any religious orders would consider you given the potential lack of stability, and so it is unlikely that you have a religious vocation, but it is possible. It would almost certainly not be a Benedictine vocation, given the rigors of the life.
(04-27-2019, 11:51 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]Diseases requiring psychotropic medication are considered an impediment to a religious or priestly vocation.

If the disease cannot be cured such that medication is not necessary, then you do not have a religious vocation, plain and simple.

If the disease can be cured, so medication is not needed, it is still likely that few if any religious orders would consider you given the potential lack of stability, and so it is unlikely that you have a religious vocation, but it is possible. It would almost certainly not be a Benedictine vocation, given the rigors of the life.

Where is that specific impediment in the code of canon law?  There are impediments regarding certain psychotic conditions, but a psychotropic drug is any drug intended to affect the mind.  There are plenty of priests out there who take medicine to manage depression and anxiety   Psychotic conditions such as schizophrenia are a different story, but medications to treat those types of conditions are just one category of psychotropic medications.
(04-28-2019, 08:06 AM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]
(04-27-2019, 11:51 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]Diseases requiring psychotropic medication are considered an impediment to a religious or priestly vocation.

If the disease cannot be cured such that medication is not necessary, then you do not have a religious vocation, plain and simple.

If the disease can be cured, so medication is not needed, it is still likely that few if any religious orders would consider you given the potential lack of stability, and so it is unlikely that you have a religious vocation, but it is possible. It would almost certainly not be a Benedictine vocation, given the rigors of the life.

Where is that specific impediment in the code of canon law?  There are impediments regarding certain psychotic conditions, but a psychotropic drug is any drug intended to affect the mind.  There are plenty of priests out there who take medicine to manage depression and anxiety   Psychotic conditions such as schizophrenia are a different story, but medications to treat those types of conditions are just one category of psychotropic medications.

It is not a canonical prohibition per se, but would be considered as an impediment due to health. That's Canon 642.

Moral and vocational manuals, are pretty clear. The older ones call mental illness an absolute impediment to solemn vows. There are some who would allow into institutes with simple vows, those well-controlled by medication and without serious illnesses. Especially nursing orders or those who have care for the sick might allow this, but as the OP proposes entry into a Benedictine convent, which would entail solemn vows.

Ultimately that decision is the superior's, because she must take responsibility for allowing the profession of the candidate. If she is unsuited, then sins and violations of those vows fall upon the conscience of the superior who lightly admitted a candidate. Given that the essence of the religious life is the vows and the living out of these, and the need for full use of reason to make such a vow, it is easily see how even a well-controlled illness might introduce questions into the validity of profession.

The danger here is for the nun herself and the and the institute. If the illness becomes less-controlled or develops, a nun would then have reason to go back and think she could abandon the religious life, because she was not competent to make vows, so she might leave religious life for a bad reason and commit serious sin by this. It also protects her. If she became a problem with her illnesses after final vows, the institute would have to care for her, but if they could question her profession due to previous mental illness, it is quite possible they could expel her and refuse care.

Thus such professions are not just meant as ceremonies, but as protections for the religious and the institute and serve to create moral responsibilities much like an employment contract does between employer and employee, a martial contract between husband and wife, etc.

The OP, if she has a mental illness, even if well-controlled, does not have a Benedictine vocation. There might be a third-order institute or a group of oblates or layfolk who do not live under vows, but live a quasi-religious life that might be a good fit, but a Religious Order in the proper sense is not her vocation.
So clinical, where's the warmth for a Culture War refugee?