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Full Version: Removing Mandatory Celibacy Will Help Priest Shortage
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This is a topic I am very interested in - I truly believe removing mandatory celibacy will help the clergy shortage, and clean the filth out.

This article shows how after removing the requirement they were getting too many married candidates for the priesthood, and limited each diocese to only two married priests:

Each diocese is allowed up to two active married priests, according to the Pastoral Provision Office, which facilitates the Vatican's policy. The restriction came several years ago after a number of dioceses sponsored four or five candidates, causing concerns that it might appear the discipline of celibacy was being relaxed.

https://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-pop...story.html

I had a conversation with an older Catholic yesterday about our priest shortage, as our diocese may be closing parishes due to lack of priests.  He said - who wants to be a priest, you are automatically labeled a homosexual or child abuser?  I said if you allow married priest that automatically gets rid of that stereotype pretty well.  He thought - and said it made sense - and he's a hard guy to reach.

Would you close parishes before ordaining married men?  Is anyone in favor of adopting the model used by the East where married men are allowed to be parish priests, but bishops are chosen from monastics?
(06-05-2019, 06:40 AM)Markie Boy Wrote: [ -> ]This is a topic I am very interested in - I truly believe removing mandatory celibacy will help the clergy shortage, and clean the filth out.

By that logic, there should be no sexual crimes at all among teachers, lawyers, non-Catholics, etc.

Quote:Would you close parishes before ordaining married men?  Is anyone in favor of adopting the model used by the East where married men are allowed to be parish priests, but bishops are chosen from monastics?

Interesting thought, and initially I'm not opposed. That being said, I don't know enough about the Eastern Church to offer an intelligent opinion.

Given the source, I can't help but think this is somehow a dig at Latin Catholics or an attempt to discredit/undermine the Church and Her teachings. And then I read this:

Quote:But Sullins also notes that having a partner in life provides extra guidance and encouragement for a clergyman to do his best.

See? It's already being redirected from "married" and "wife" to the more modern PC term "partner."

which was immediately followed by this:

Quote:If he gets a phone call in the middle of the night, he said, his wife would encourage him to get up and go, whereas a celibate priest may be tempted to roll over and go back to sleep.

taking an unsupported dig at a celibate priesthood. Of course, they didn't mention the flip side of the argument, which is that a married priest may be tempted to stay in bed snuggled up with his wife partner.
Quote:By that logic, there should be no sexual crimes at all among teachers, lawyers, non-Catholics, etc.

There aren't. Since teachers can get married, they never once have any temptations to lust. Young married female teachers especially... never once has there ever been a problem since they can marry. Same with lawyers, since they know the law, they would never violate it. Also with non-Catholics, since they don't have an oppressive medieval that makes them think that they are sinners. Denying that sin is a thing is the best way to prevent yourself from ever sinning.

All kidding aside, I think this is where my ability to sympathize with Easterners cuts out. Plenty of Eastern Catholics and Orthodox would complain, in my opinion justly, about Latinizing trends, making Eastern Catholics behave like Western Catholics? 

But, for whatever reason, the Westerners need to be more Eastern. Then, and only then, will all the problems in the Church dissipate. 

I don't see the logical connection, maybe I am just blind.
I'm not saying it will be filth free - no place human is. Just better.

A little much on the suppositions I'd say - most married people have referred to their spouse as partner at times I bet.

And it's totally true - God said it was not good for man to be alone. I bet most husbands would say at times their wife helps them understand things and make better decisions.
The clergy shortage has nothing to do with celibacy. If it did, why are the traditional seminaries full and having to turn men away? But when seminaries are full of homosexuals, and the pantsuit-wearing vocations director nun refers you to a psychiatrist if you’re too orthodox, it’s no wonder men don’t want any part of that.

And why the rush to change it when most of the clergy, especially the orthodox ones, are just fine with it?
I'd like to see numbers that some seminaries are actually turning people away because they are so full. If that's true why are we importing so many priest from other countries rather than just other states?

That would make so little sense I can't get my head around it.

I am for changing it for multiple reasons - mostly historical and Biblical - in search of improvement.

In our dioceses they may close more parishes due to priest shortages.
(06-05-2019, 08:24 AM)Markie Boy Wrote: [ -> ]I'd like to see numbers that some seminaries are actually turning people away because they are so full.  If that's true why are we importing so many priest from other countries rather than just other states?  

That would make so little sense I can't get my head around it.

I am for changing it for multiple reasons - mostly historical and Biblical - in search of improvement.

In our dioceses they may close more parishes due to priest shortages.

Because Bishops like yours obviously don't want orthodox Priests. It's really a no brainer! Either have an orthodox Diocesan seminary like St Gregory the Great here in Lincoln (which is full, BTW), or send your  men to an orthodox seminary  elsewhere. Bishops who have well formed, orthodox Priests aren't going to give them up, and  why  would an orthodox Priest want to transfer to a Diocese that is so rotten it can't produce its own?
There is something in that last line Jovan that I recently thought of - a diocese that can't produce it's own pastors really has something wrong with it.

You would really have to have a sacrificial heart, and desire to bring the Gospel to people that are not hearing it well to come to a diocese like this, I agree. I had a friend that was in seminary here, and got to see how they can make life miserable for them, so I get that.
(06-05-2019, 07:43 AM)Markie Boy Wrote: [ -> ]A little much on the suppositions I'd say - most married people have referred to their spouse as partner at times I bet.  

Speaking for myself, nope. Not once have I called my wife "partner." I've called her my wife, and sometimes my good half, but never my partner. It has too many connotations of either uncommitted shackin' up, or buggery. Especially when it's used by the press.
(06-05-2019, 08:24 AM)Markie Boy Wrote: [ -> ]I'd like to see numbers that some seminaries are actually turning people away because they are so full.  If that's true why are we importing so many priest from other countries rather than just other states?

Why would liberal bishops want the ICR and FSSP and (gasp!) SSPX coming in? They might do something horrible, you know, like preach actual Catholicism.

That's not to say that all diocesan priests are unorthodox, but they're all okay with saying the new Mass, and if they do get too out of line, like getting rid of female altar boys or turning around to face God, the bishop can either fire them or assign them somewhere other than a parish. And they're less likely to get Susan from the parish council upset, like what happened in Indiana.

It also allows bishops to call for things like priestesses and getting rid of celibacy. And they can blame the shortage (which they've created).
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