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What are your thoughts on this article? It's good to see so many trying to move towards tradition and orthodoxy (which is what I'm trying to do). This is interesting considering many of the younger generations including mine grew up in NO parishes. In fact I'm sure there are a lot of people who do not know what a TLM is. I pray that the USCCB will see the light through all the corruption including their own and start promoting the TLM before Francis stamps it out or tries to. They could at the very least start teaching a sound catechism so people actually know their faith. If we could even get a push for more reverent NO masses that would be a good start which the article touches on (This could be KEY).

God Bless

Church Militant Article Link


Quote:[Image: 2019-06-14-Youth_Tradition.jpg]

US bishops' conference asks young people why they're Catholic; they say it's Latin Mass and orthodoxy

BALTIMORE (ChurchMilitant.com) - As the U.S. bishops meet in Baltimore, young Catholics on social media said what keeps them Catholic is the Traditional Latin Mass.
The social media accounts for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) posed the question, "If you are a young Catholic who is still Catholic, what has made you stay?"
The question received thousands of responses, many of them advocating for tradition and orthodoxy.
Many young Catholics cited the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharistconfession, the Rosary, beautiful churches, reverent liturgy and the Traditional Latin Mass (TLM) as important for their faith.
One Twitter user emphasized, "The Eucharist and holding fast to Sacred Tradition."

He went on to say that he wanted to see more churches "bring back ad orientem, altar rails and beautiful Latin chant, so that kids will truly believe that Jesus is present in the Eucharist. What we present externally affects what we believe internally."

The Eucharist was a common theme in the responses on Twitter and Facebook.
For instance, one convert said the Eucharist was the most important thing for which she came to the Catholic faith.
"Didn't start out Catholic, but I'll answer anyway," she tweeted. "I came for the liturgy and the sacraments, and most of all, [the] Eucharist."

Other reasons given were the Church's doctrines, the saints, good catechesis, reading Catholic authors like G. K. Chesterton and the witness of faithful priests.

One Catholic replied to the USCCB's Twitter account, "I was taught salvation history by a good priest, the Bible started to make sense to me, and ultimately this directed me to the Eucharist."

A young Dominican priest emphasized the importance of tradition, theology and liturgy, saying in a tweet, "Pope Benedict XVI saved me during college; during high school it was discovering the Extraordinary Form."

Many of those responding simply said they love Catholicism because it is the truth.

For instance, one Twitter user stated, "Traditional Catholic teachings, doctrines, and values. Because they are The Truth."


Many of those responding simply said they love Catholicism because it is the truth.

For instance, one Twitter user stated, "Traditional Catholic teachings, doctrines, and values. Because they are The Truth."

Many young Catholics were of the opinion that traditional liturgy goes hand in hand with sound Catholic teaching.

"I found the beauty of intellectual truth in the teachings of the Church, the True Presence of the Eucharist, and the manifestation of both of these things in the reverence and beauty of the Extraordinary Form of the Mass," wrote one Catholic Twitter user.

A Catholic mother commented on the USCCB's Facebook post, "I'm 38 and a practicing Catholic. I stay because I know it is the One True Faith. The reverence of the TLM is what encourages me, as well as seeing so many young families with many children at Mass every week."

Another young Catholic gave a three-word comment on Twitter: "the Latin Mass."
Some of the young adults brought up issues that they have encountered in the Church, with many criticizing heterodoxy and superficial efforts to make the Church more appealing to youth.

One Twitter user complained that he had to teach himself Catholic doctrine out of the Baltimore Catechism after a director of religious education tried to teach him heresy about Christ.

"I taught myself the faith out of the Baltimore Catechism," the 32-year-old complained, "after the DRE at my local parish tried telling us Jesus had sins."
Many responses also complained about liturgical abuses and bad liturgical music.

After a busy few days on social media, some mainstream Catholic media outfits did reports on who was responsible for managing the USCCB's social media accounts.
The person mainly responsible for the accounts, 31-year-old Connie Poulos, said in an interview this week that it was recently decided to use social media to "engage" with ordinary Catholics. 


It has been widely observed that traditional liturgy is increasingly popular among youth and young adults.
A survey of more than 1,000 Latin Mass attendees published earlier this year found that a huge majority of them embrace Catholic morality and theology. It also found that they have an estimated fertility rate of 6 children per woman — in contrast with the 2.3 children per woman fertility rate of U.S. Catholics as a whole.
Father Donald Kloster, the Connecticut priest responsible for the study, told Church Militant back in February, "Even if my study has a large margin of error, the numbers themselves speak volumes to anyone who has no interference from their own bias or ideology."

The number of parishes offering the TLM exploded after 2007 when Pope Benedict XVI issued a document called Summorum Pontificum, which made it much easier for parishes to have TLM on a regular basis. In a letter to bishops explaining Summorum Pontificum, Benedict noted that the old version of the Missal "was never juridically abrogated and, consequently, in principle, was always permitted."

In other words, the TLM was always broadly allowed in theory, even though Church leaders tried to restrict it in practice.

Last year, some TLM parishes were given special permission to revive the pre-1955 liturgical customs for Holy Week.
In 1955, the Holy Week liturgies were changed by the removal and simplification of various rituals. Some argue that the 1955 Holy Week revision established a precedent for the later changes to the liturgy that brought about the Novus Ordo. Others point even farther back, to changes that Pope St. Pius X made to the Liturgy of the Hours.
I can relate - I am self taught on almost everything (it may show at times Smile ).  My RCIA was terribly boring and so "read the textbook" I don't know if anyone gets anything out of it.

There is no adult ed - I really have a hard time saying much good about my Catholic experience in the local parish, and diocese in general.

I had the opportunity to help my brother "church shop" a little while ago, and looking at all the local churches one thing stood out - none of them really stood out as the Truth!  Having been in the local Catholic Church for a while, it was a hard sell as I know how bad the preaching and teaching is, or lack of.  And entering it, it looks, sounds, and smells pretty much like the local Lutheran churches, just with worse preaching and no Bible study.

It was and still is a difficult thing.

I did attend a very reverent Novus Ordo outside our area, and it was done really well - I think I prefer it to Latin.  But even my old Baptist church was more reverent in some things, like music selection, than my current NO parish.

The Church needs to be different, sound different, and look different than the rest of the world.

Wish we had an Eastern Catholic parish near by...…….
Well that was not the answer the USCCB wanted to hear.

A lot of these clergy above 55 would rather go their graves then see the TLM restored.

They didnt get on the liturgical revolution train just to give in now.

One local priest said he would leave the priesthood(?) If the Latin Mass was permitted in our area.

Eastern parishes are a nice refuge, but not all of us feel quite at home there.

We want our ancestral heritage back.
While this is all well and good, I think it is useful to add a caveat for those who read these sorts of articles and then believe that things are really getting better in a substantial way just because more and more youth are drawn to the Latin Mass. I really don't mean to be a downer, but it's important for the idealistic types (like myself) who when they see the harsh reality become disillusioned and go off the deep end.

Consider the number of youth drawn to the Latin Mass vs. the youth who show up at things like World Youth Day. Or the youth who go to Life Teen. Or the youth who are completely in support of the Charismatic mumbo-jumbo of Steubenville. You should see my point: while it is good that more youth are drawn to Tradition, for every youth who is drawn to tradition, maybe 10 (who knows) other Catholic youth are drawn to all the feel-good fruits of modernism and Catholic-lite.

Now, you may point out that the youth who are into World Youth Day, Life Teen, and Charismatic/Protestant stuff are orthodox--they are pro-life, they believe in the Real Presence, they go to Confession regularly, and practice a true spiritual life. Yes, that's true, and it is necessary since our personal goals is salvation of our souls.

But in terms of reform of the Church, it is not sufficient. And the reason is this: while these youth are orthodox, and even while many of the youth who like the Latin Mass are drawn precisely because of its obvious orthodoxy, at the end of the day, they are drawn to each of these options because they are simply that: options that fit personal preference. And while they are all indeed options for (surface level) orthodoxy, this means business as usual in the Church. The Church may continue to supply the demand for all.

But if you ask many of these young adults drawn to the Latin Mass what the real problem is, only a fraction will have dug below the surface to get to some of the root problems: Vatican II, modernism, etc. These Latin Mass-loving youth may go to the Latin Mass and tell you with a straight face that there was absolutely nothing wrong or problematic about the Vatican II documents. They may love the Latin Mass as much as they love a Novus Ordo Mass that resembles a Latin Mass. (I'm speaking of young adults who start going to a diocesan/FSSP/ICKSP Latin Mass. The knowledge and dynamic changes if you ask youth who have grown up going to something like a SSPX or sedevacantist Mass.)

Case in point: the Dominican priest quoted in the article above was a personal friend of mine before he entered the Dominicans. I was even present when he received the habit. He is a wonderful man with a brilliant and keen mind (fitting for a Dominican) and a great personality. But at the end of the day he says the Novus Ordo (in addition to the Dominican rite) because he must. He would never say "no" to it or to Vatican II because he can't. He has written and said many things in esteem of the "true spirit of Vatican II." He is, in short, a company man.

When it comes to diocesan seminarians, many don't care one whit about the Latin Mass. They may like reverent liturgy, but many times it's not for the sake of a proper worship of God. Many like reverent liturgy for its aesthetic qualities, which align with their temperament, or because they believe reverent liturgy is an expression of existential authenticity, whereas much of the hootenanny stuff is wrong mostly because it is so forced and kitsch. The theological issue is secondary to the aesthetic and personal. I've met plenty of young seminarians and priests who are simply not orthodox. They are happy with the death of Latin, chant, incense, and the corruptions of the Medieval past. They love guitar Masses and having 3 or more languages at a single liturgy just for the sake of inclusivity. There are plenty of these sorts of young seminarians and priests, unfortunately.

Many of the diocesan seminarians who like the Latin Mass or are drawn to reverent liturgy never come to the point of realizing that there are deeper problems to the chaos today. It takes the special Providence of God to bring them to the realization that Vatican II may have anything to do with it (and the events leading up to Vatican II). In their minds, the real problem is liberals in the Church. They don't go the next step and ask, "Well, were the liberals allowed to get away with anything significant that may affect the course of the Church?" Like, say, the ambiguities of Vatican II or changing the Mass itself!

So while it is good that more and more younger people are working out their salvation in the safer and surer way of the traditional Sacraments, don't expect much more about it because as I said, for every one young person who goes to the Latin Mass, ten more are going to Charismatic / Protestant praise-and-worship type stuff. Maybe they all will be saved, but in the meantime, it's business as usual. 

This is why groups like the SSPX--or more precisely, especially and particularly the SSPX--are so important. The SSPX is the ONLY group with the influence and size it has in the mainstream Church that is saying: Vatican II has serious problems, and they need to be addressed now. You will not hear it from the FSSP or the ICKSP although the priests will tell you that in private. Working towards re-establishing doctrinal clarity and orthodoxy is a necessary first step to re-establishing the faith on a wider level, for you cannot love God properly if you do not know Him properly.
Dear Luca Brandolini:

I went to the Facebook post the USCCB made.  About 90% or so of the comments were young Catholics who want tradition.  Where were all the other young Catholics with their opinions?  Nowhere to be seen.  Not a single person mentioned LifeTeen, World Youth Day or the charismatic movement.  There were a handful of boomers trying to "shut it down" with their hippy-dippy nonsense and getting the pushback of their lives about it from the young trads.  It's an interesting dynamic, that's for sure.

And of course, the USCCB did not acknowledge a single thing about tradition.  Just a few lame comments about "happy for you".
(06-15-2019, 06:45 PM)mpk1987 Wrote: [ -> ]I went to the Facebook post the USCCB made.  About 90% or so of the comments were young Catholics who want tradition.  Where were all the other young Catholics with their opinions?  Nowhere to be seen.  Not a single person mentioned LifeTeen, World Youth Day or the charismatic movement.  There were a handful of boomers trying to "shut it down" with their hippy-dippy nonsense and getting the pushback of their lives about it from the young trads.  It's an interesting dynamic, that's for sure.

And of course, the USCCB did not acknowledge a single thing about tradition.  Just a few lame comments about "happy for you".

This where it gets cruel.

The flock is begging for bread, and they are given stones.

I have handed on what I received was the motto for faithful bishops.

But the Hierarchy only knows the New Order.

Are they even capable of handing on Tradition?
(06-15-2019, 06:45 PM)mpk1987 Wrote: [ -> ]I went to the Facebook post the USCCB made.  About 90% or so of the comments were young Catholics who want tradition.  Where were all the other young Catholics with their opinions?  Nowhere to be seen.  Not a single person mentioned LifeTeen, World Youth Day or the charismatic movement.  

And that's the key. All those 'youfs' that turn out for World Youth Day and things like that, don't care about the Church. It's a good time and they go to Mass as part of it . Sundays? 'Well, you know, it's summer and I'm going to the lake, I've got an exam on Monday, etc., etc.' 


I used to go to a 'teen Mass' often because of convenience. I was often tapped to help with the collection because there were no teens to do it. The only thing 'teen' about it was the ageing hippies playing 'kewl' music on their guitars.
I have to be honest, I'm not drawn naturally to TLM - but I'd take it in a heartbeat over the 70's folk music jam we have.

No World Youth Day or Charismatic stuff - I'm in!
(06-15-2019, 10:38 PM)Markie Boy Wrote: [ -> ]I have to be honest, I'm not drawn naturally to TLM - but I'd take it in a heartbeat over the 70's folk music jam we have.

No World Youth Day or Charismatic stuff - I'm in!

I dont disagree here. Our local diocesan TLM is Low Mass only almost all the time. Its not a very "enticing" Mass, but I can tell you this. The people that go to that Mass are there for serious business. And you know it as soon as you walk in. It may not be the most awe inspiring like a Missa Cantata or a Solemn High Mass, but the people it brings there are seriously dedicated to their faith, and I love that.
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