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Is there a set number? 
10%?
I don't know rules or regulations, so I'll just say that now. I've always heard we need to tithe 10%.

I heard a great sermon from an FSSP priest who said that while we need to tithe 10% of our income, it need not all go to our parish. His suggestion was that we give 5% to our parish, 4% to other charities/worthy causes of our choice, and 1% to our dioceses.  This is what my wife and I do. The 4% mostly goes to a few regular recipients, but some of it is set aside for more "impromptu" charitable works.

I do understand why some choose not to give to their diocese. As a matter of justice I'd say we need to under normal circumstances, but there's a lot to take into consideration besides the current crisis, particularly the cathedraticum. Regardless, it was the opinion of the FSSP priest in question that we need to donate to the diocese as a matter of justice.
Out of curiosity, where does the 10% figure come from?
10%? I literally cannot give $300 a month to the Church, as much as I would like to.

So I give what I can when I have it.
(07-31-2019, 08:40 PM)Florus Wrote: [ -> ]Out of curiosity, where does the 10% figure come from?

I've always understood that the biblical term tithe means 10 percent.
There isn't a set amount or percentage.

The precept is "to help to provide for the needs of the Church according to one's abilities and station in life", and the relevant canon is that "the Christian faithful are obliged to assist with the needs of the Church so that the Church has what is necessary for divine worship, for the works of the apostolate and of charity, and for the decent support of ministers."

Neither does it demand that the contribution be financial.  Many people find themselves unable to offer much financially, but able to give their time or other resources to assist.  A person spending his time each week dusting and cleaning the church certainly provides for a need in a way necessary for divine worship, as much as someone who donates money to buy altar bread.  And a mother who spends most of her resources providing for her children but prays fervently for her priests during her daily duties provides a great spiritual support for the ministers.

It needn't be a dichotomy either; you can both give financially according to your means, and similarly of your time.

Conversely, one who is wealthy should not feel he has fulfilled his duty by giving 10%, as if checking off a checkbox, when he could readily provide more of his resources to support the poor and the needs of the church.

It's all about one's state in life.  The law ends with obliging support of the Church and the poor; the application thereof is a decision each person and family must prayerfully decide, mindful of both their temporal and spiritual responsibilities.
(07-31-2019, 11:43 PM)karl Wrote: [ -> ]
(07-31-2019, 08:40 PM)Florus Wrote: [ -> ]Out of curiosity, where does the 10% figure come from?

I've always understood that the biblical term tithe means 10 percent.

It does indeed.  Amongst other places, Deuteronomy 14:22 reads, "Every year thou shalt set aside the tithes ["decimam partem", i.e. the tenth part] of all thy fruits that the earth bringeth forth".
There's only one priest that I have ever heard give a homily on tithing: Fr. Keith Weber from St. Isidore's Catholic Student Center in Manhattan, KS.  He related tithing to the etymology meaning "tenth part", and reminded everyone that it is bound on us by scripture and tradition to tithe.  He also stated that the bishop typically suggests on how to divide it up.  The bishops in this region give a guide thus: 1% for the Holy Father (Peter's Pence), 1% for the Bishop, 3% for the parish, and then 5% for alms, to make up 10% of one's gross income. 

If you look at what you make yearly when you do your taxes, you get an idea of what 10% of your gross income is, then divide it up by 52 weeks.  If you make more that year, then divide up the 10% of the excess as your bishop suggests.
(08-01-2019, 12:38 AM)yablabo Wrote: [ -> ]There's only one priest that I have ever heard give a homily on tithing: Fr. Keith Weber from St. Isidore's Catholic Student Center in Manhattan, KS.  He related tithing to the etymology meaning "tenth part", and reminded everyone that it is bound on us by scripture and tradition to tithe.  He also stated that the bishop typically suggests on how to divide it up.  The bishops in this region give a guide thus: 1% for the Holy Father (Peter's Pence), 1% for the Bishop, 3% for the parish, and then 5% for alms, to make up 10% of one's gross income. 

If you look at what you make yearly when you do your taxes, you get an idea of what 10% of your gross income is, then divide it up by 52 weeks.  If you make more that year, then divide up the 10% of the excess as your bishop suggests.

I would not follow those guidelines.  For one thing, I absolutely will not give one percent- or even one cent- to Peter's Pence for Francis to throw at some futile, globalist cause.  I also will not give to my parish, which continually hemorrhages money into the severed artery known as a parochial school.
10% would be fine if I wasn't paying taxes. I pay about 3-4% to the parish i attend, now that I'm retired, and none to bishops if I can help it, especially if it's connected to the USCCB. I pay a couple hundred a year contribution to a Catholic school as well, but it's a tax break. Is it nullified then?

When I was working I payed some serious taxes, much of that going to social welfare programs. You gotta wonder how that works into the original intent of tithing. It's not voluntary so it's not charity, but it goes to what would be considered charitable causes. But since it doesn't go to the Church, I suppose it doesn't count. However, I've heard the federal government forks out some serious bucks to Catholic organizations, to include the USCCB. Now where do we stand, since some of that money comes from tax payers?

I'm being a little sarcastic, but I only have so much to give.
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