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There are many myths surrounding Christopher Columbus and with his "Birthday" approaching on Monday, here are some facts about him and his voyage to the New World for you from an email I received today:


Email Wrote:Tribulation Times

READ THE BIBLE IN ONE YEAR
https://oneyearbibleonline.com/october-oyb/?version=63&startmmdd=0101

October 14, 2019  

(Mat 28:19-20) Going therefore, teach ye all nations: baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost. Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you. And behold I am with you all days, even to the consummation of the world.

CATHOLIC EXCHANGE: Columbus's discoveries not only paved the way for the evangelization of Latin America but also brought an end to the cannibalism of the Caribs and the tradition of human sacrifices among the Aztecs. Today, Latin America is home to 39 percent of the world’s Catholics and has two of the five countries with the most Catholics, Brazil and Mexico.

CATHOLIC STANDColumbus, Catholicism and Courage

WEBSITEWho Was the Real Christopher Columbus?

HISTORY TODAYColumbus - Hero or Villain?

EXCERPTThe Catholic Spirit of Christopher Columbus

Columbus believed he was specially chosen by God to bring the Gospel to a people who were living in darkness and the shadow of death. He believed his given name, Christopher, signified the mission he was destined to carry out, as his son Fernando would later explain: “Just as Saint Christopher bore Christ over the waters, so too was he to bear the light of the Gospel over the vast oceans.”

Spreading the Catholic faith and acquiring riches so as to finance the retaking of Jerusalem from the Muslims were at the heart of Columbus’ mission. Any hopes of personal rewards or honors were secondary. In writing the royal treasurer of Spain at the completion of the first journey, he gives the reason all people, present and future, should celebrate what would come to be known as Columbus Day:

“And now ought the King, Queen, Princes, and all their dominions, as well as the whole of Christians, to give thanks to our Savior Jesus Christ who has granted us such a victory and great success. Let processions be ordered, let solemn festivals be celebrated, let the temples be filled with boughs and flowers. Let Christ rejoice upon earth as he does in heaven, to witness the coming salvation of so many people, heretofore given over to perdition. Let us rejoice for the exaltation of our faith, as well as for the augmentation of our temporal prosperity, in which not only Spain but all Christendom shall participate.”

Five Myths About Christopher Columbus

1. MYTH: Columbus was sailing to prove the world was round.
FACT: Every educated person at the end of the fifteenth century knew the earth was a sphere, a fact known since antiquity. What was in dispute was the earth’s circumference, which Columbus underestimated by one-fourth.

2. MYTH: Queen Isabella sold her crown jewels to finance the first journey.
FACT: The royal treasury of Spain was depleted after the completion of the conquest of Granada early in 1492. However, Luis de Santangel, the royal treasurer, was able to secure funding by reaching out to the Crusading societies throughout the Mediterranean, as well as other financial backers from Spain and elsewhere. The crown put up very little to finance the journey.

3. MYTH: There was a priest on board the Santa Maria in 1492.
FACT: Because of the dangers involved, there were no priests or friars on the first voyage, despite the deep piety of Columbus. Many of the paintings of the first landfall in the new world on San Salvador show a priest with Columbus—contrary to the facts. There were five priests on the second voyage: Benedictine Father Buil; the Jeronymite Father Ramon Pane; and three Franciscans.

4. MYTH: Columbus introduced slavery to the New World.
FACT: Slavery was already widespread among the native Indians when Columbus arrived. Columbus was insistent on the fair treatment of the Indians, a policy which gained him many enemies as governor of Hispaniola. Bartolome de las Casas, a Spanish friar who worked for the protection of the Indians, is quick to excoriate his fellow Spaniards in their grave abuses, but is filled with nothing but respect and admiration for Columbus. The mass subjugation and importation of Africans to the Americas did not begin until a generation after Columbus’ death.

5. MYTH: Columbus died a pauper, in chains, in a Spanish prison.
FACT: Despite the fact that the Spanish crown retracted some of the privileges promised to Columbus, he was relatively wealthy at the time of his death. Although he returned to Spain in chains in 1500 after his third voyage, the King and Queen apologized for the misunderstanding and had them removed.

On May 20, 1506, the Vigil of the Ascension, Christopher Columbus lay on his deathbed in his apartment at Valladolid, surrounded by his fellow Franciscans and his sons. As the friars chanted Compline, his last words echoed those of Christ on the cross: In manus tuas, Domine, commendo spiritum meum. (Into your hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.)

EXCERPTChristopher Columbus and Fake History

The writings of Bartolomé de las Casas — a 16th-century Spanish Dominican priest, historian and missionary — exposing the abuse of the native peoples are often cited in an effort to impugn Columbus. But while de las Casas lamented the suffering of indigenous people, he also admired and respected Columbus for his “sweetness and benignity” of character, his deep faith and his accomplishments.

“He was the first to open the doors to the ocean sea, where he entered the remote lands and kingdoms which until then had not known our Savior, Jesus Christ, and his blessed name,” de las Casas wrote in his History of the Indies. While cognizant that Columbus was human and made mistakes, de las Casas never doubted the explorer’s good intentions, writing: “Truly, I would not dare blame the admiral’s intentions, for I knew him well and I know his intentions are good.”

According to Delaney, Columbus “fervently believed it was the duty of every Christian to try to save the souls of non- Christians,” and it was this passion that “led him on a great adventure, an encounter such as the world has never seen.”

Not surprisingly, popes since the late 19th century have praised Columbus’ mission of evangelization. Pope John Paul II, while celebrating Mass at a Columbus monument in the Dominican Republic near the 1992 quincentenary, said the crossshaped memorial “means to symbolize the cross of Christ planted in this land in 1492.” In a speech to the young people of Genoa in May, Pope Francis talked about how a disciple of Christ needs the “virtue of a navigator,” and he pointed to the example of Columbus who faced “a great challenge” and showed “courage,” a trait he indicated was essential to becoming a “good missionary.”

EWTN REVIEWHonoring Christopher Columbus

Ladder of Divine Ascent excerpt: Step 26- "Brief Summary on Discernment"
43. As it is impossible for a starving man not to think of bread, so it is impossible for a man eager to be saved not to think of death and judgment.
Columbus should be canonized a Saint
(10-13-2019, 07:45 PM)Augustinian Wrote: [ -> ]Columbus should be canonized a Saint

His Cause and that of Queen Isabella were both introduced around the time of the quadricentennial of his discovery of the Americas in 1892. As the modernists gained more control, they were both 'forgotten' about. Now, of course, it's 'racist' and 'neo-colonialist' to convert indigenous people, so his Cause is dead in the water.
Then, this morning over breakfast, I saw this very nice article about Christopher:


Article Wrote:Link to Original Article

Hidden History: Columbus’ Amazing Catholicism
October 14, 2019 by sd
[Image: logoinside.gif]

[Image: 11212764_10205855372920246_2724079792531...C900&ssl=1]

The year was 1326. The location was southwest of Madrid. The event was an apparition of the Virgin Mary at a spot — near the Guadalupe River in Spain — that quickly was turned into a shrine, two full centuries before the far more famous Guadalupe appearances in Mexico (which were probably named for this earlier Spanish appearance of Mary).

[Image: cacerces_frame.jpg]

The Spanish Guadalupe (an apparition to a cowherd named Gil Cordero) became a major pilgrim spot like that which followed in Mexico, and one of the pilgrims who frequented it was a Spanish explorer (of Italian birth) named Cristóbo Colón, or Christopher Columbus.

He prayed at the shrine before all voyages and a replica of Mary as represented at the site (a Black Madonna) traveled with him to the new world (on the Santa Maria).

Is this why modern secularists resist Columbus? Do they sense his deep spirituality?

For deep — far deeper than even most Catholics know — it was.

“[Queen] Isabella had prayed at the foot of the Black Madonna for guidance on whether to finance Columbus’s journey,” notes an historical account. “Columbus went to the monastery to pray for a safe voyage. When he returned to Spain, he traveled to the monastery [at Guadalupe] to thank the Virgin for her help and protection.”

This gets to the nitty-gritty of it and also takes us to what is not recorded in history textbooks.

For Christopher Columbus was not only a devout Catholic, but — like other explorers who would follow in his wake — a missionary. He considered the evangelization of the New World his primary goal.

[Image: Dali_DiscoveryOfAmerica.jpg]

And if his devotion was not obvious enough in the moniker of his key ship (which was named for the image at Guadalupe), it was there during the first voyage, as the crew recited the Hail Mary daily and upon landing at spots along the way, in the Caribbean, prayed the Salve Regina.

One such island he named Guadeloupe. Others were christened with names such as San Salvador (for the Savior).

In fact, Columbus, one comes to learn, was a third-order Franciscan who when possible attended daily Mass, including a liturgy as well as Confession before setting out on his dangerous, remarkable, history-making exploration. Don’t tell public schools this! (Not even Catholic schools know it.)

Fair of complexion, with freckles and an aquiline nose, neither pudgy nor rail-thin, with grey hair, on the muscular side, high of cheekbone, somewhat taller than average, with the carriage of an aristocrat, yet the sensibilities of a crewman, Columbus often wore a monk’s cord around his waist and sometimes — not aboard, that anyone has reported, but after his famous expeditions — was seen in a monk’s robe, entertaining thoughts, at one point, of entering a monastery.

This was one very Catholic man, which goes a ways toward explaining the attempts by secularists to downplay his critical role (in the very establishment of a hemisphere) to the point of eliminating a day that on the American calendar dedicated to him.

Amazingly enough, Columbus’s goal was not just discovery of new territories, as one writer noted, but “bringing the remote and unknown regions of the earth into communion with Christian Europe; carrying the light of the true Faith into benighted and pagan lands and gathering their countless nations under the holy dominion of the Church.”

This is hidden history. This we never learn in history class.

[Image: c921f431618f8c7796759aab4cb5536f.jpg]
As it turns out, there is much hidden in the establishment of America.

On the Santa Maria, the standard of the Cross was raised, and the explorer carried a picture of Jesus Crucified. Some believe they sang “Star of the Sea” on the way across the often foreboding Atlantic — these waters so prone to tropical storms, even category-five ones.

Concerned about direction, and anxious to spot land, Columbus and his crew at one point spotted a strange light that to this day has not been explained definitively. This was on October 11, 1492, and was described, in his own journal, as “a small wax candle that rose and lifted up, which to few seemed to be an indication of land.”

Academics have come up with various potential explanations: that it was tar torches carried by natives, or the bioluminescence of protozoa along the rock (this latter explanation discarded due to Columbus’s depiction of it as from a point source, and also the timing: such protozoa only radiate lights after a full moon; this was near the first quarter). Whatever it was, the worried crew soon caught sight of land.

Upon landing, Columbus immediately planted the standard of the Cross and prostrated himself three times in thanksgiving, according to biographer George Barton, kissing with teary eyes “the soil to which he was conducted by the Divine Goodness,” while the others “participating in his emotions and kneeling as he did, elevated a Crucifix in the air.

“Raising his grateful hands and thanking from the bottom of his heart his Heavenly Father, Columbus found in the effusions of his loving gratitude, an admirable prayer, the first accents of which are preserved by history: ‘Lord Eternal and Almighty God, Who by Thy Sacred Word hast created the heavens, the earth, and the seas, may Thy Name be blessed and glorified forever. May Thy Majesty be exalted who hast deigned to permit that, by Thy humble servant, Thy Sacred Name should be made part of the world.'”
Christopher Columbus was declaring half of the world — a hemisphere stretching, as it turned out, more than twenty thousand miles, from Chile to Alaska, from Vancouver to Puerto Rico — for Christianity; for Catholicism; for Jesus.

No wonder later scholars would later seek to besmirch him!

No wonder his name is being eradicated from the public square!

How many secularists — atheists — would want it known that the discovery of America was an intensely Christian moment, and more specifically, a Catholic one?

[adapted from Where the Cross Stands]
[Image: wherecross2_small.jpg]
Nice! That book is free on kindle unlimited, I might start reading it tonight.

It's amazing just how thoroughly Catholic the foundations of pre-Masonic America were. Before I was Catholic, or right-wing, I adhered to the false view that the Spanish, Portuguese and French were all oppressors who only enslaved and murdered the native populations. Thank God this continent was Catholic before it was Masonic!

Christopher Columbus pray for us
Columbus is just another historical victim of modern left-wing revisionism.
You have people accusing him and the main powers during the age of discovery, namely the empires of Portugal and Spain, of commiting full scale "genocides" against the indigenous peaceful people of the Americas, of bringing "white supremacy", of stealing everything they could.
Certainly there were some excesses here and there, but they attempt to make them nazi-prototypes.
Not to mention the attacks made against the Jesuit heritage.
(10-14-2019, 09:35 AM)Augustinian Wrote: [ -> ]Nice! That book is free on kindle unlimited, I might start reading it tonight.

It's amazing just how thoroughly Catholic the foundations of pre-Masonic America were. Before I was Catholic, or right-wing, I adhered to the false view that the Spanish, Portuguese and French were all oppressors who only enslaved and murdered the native populations. Thank God this continent was Catholic before it was Masonic!

Christopher Columbus pray for us

Indeed! The Spanish STOPPED the native's genocide. They literally sickened by the sight of blood running down the pyramids from the captured enemy soldiers and the cannibalism, the eating of raw beating hearts, ripped from the chests.

Horrors does not do it justice.

Its a great book and sets the record straight about a bunch of stuff the Masons didn't want known.
(10-14-2019, 10:36 AM)Ioannes_L Wrote: [ -> ]Columbus is just another historical victim of modern left-wing revisionism.
You have people accusing him and the main powers during the age of discovery, namely the empires of Portugal and Spain, of commiting full scale "genocides" against the indigenous peaceful people of the Americas, of bringing "white supremacy", of stealing everything they could.
Certainly there were some excesses here and there, but they attempt to make them nazi-prototypes.
Not to mention the attacks made against the Jesuit heritage.

I've often wondered why. if those horrid Spaniards and Portuguese  committed 'genocide', the predominant ethnic groups in the lands they settled are, to this day, indigenous peoples and mestizos (mixed race), unlike areas the prots settled, which, at least until recently, were predominantly lily white?
(10-14-2019, 05:56 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-14-2019, 10:36 AM)Ioannes_L Wrote: [ -> ]Columbus is just another historical victim of modern left-wing revisionism.
You have people accusing him and the main powers during the age of discovery, namely the empires of Portugal and Spain, of commiting full scale "genocides" against the indigenous peaceful people of the Americas, of bringing "white supremacy", of stealing everything they could.
Certainly there were some excesses here and there, but they attempt to make them nazi-prototypes.
Not to mention the attacks made against the Jesuit heritage.

I've often wondered why. if those horrid Spaniards and Portuguese  committed 'genocide', the predominant ethnic groups in the lands they settled are, to this day, indigenous peoples and mestizos (mixed race), unlike areas the prots settled, which, at least until recently, were predominantly lily white?

Shhh... Jovan! Don't present facts. Those things are harmful to the narrative!
(10-14-2019, 05:30 PM)Zedta Wrote: [ -> ]Indeed! The Spanish STOPPED the native's genocide. They literally sickened by the sight of blood running down the pyramids from the captured enemy soldiers and the cannibalism, the eating of raw beating hearts, ripped from the chests.

But... but... that's their CULTURE! You're oppressing their culture!
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