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Quote:[1] I have lifted up my eyes to the mountains, from whence help shall come to me. ... [2] My help is from the Lord, who made heaven and earth. ... [3] May he not suffer thy foot to be moved: neither let him slumber that keepeth thee. ... [4] Behold he shall neither slumber nor sleep, that keepeth Israel. ... [5] The Lord is thy keeper, the Lord is thy protection upon thy right hand.

... [6] The sun shall not burn thee by day: nor the moon by night. ... [7] The Lord keepeth thee from all evil: may the Lord keep thy soul. ... [8] May the Lord keep thy coming in and thy going out; from henceforth now and for ever.


What does that mean? How does the moon burn? Thanks. Edit: that's Psalm 120, not 20.
"The moon, the governess of floods,

Pale in her anger, washes all the air,

That rheumatic diseases do abound."

Midsummer Night's Dream, ii.2.

"It is the very error of the moon;

She comes more near the earth than she was wont,

And makes men mad."

Othello, v. 2.
Isil the Sheen the Vanyar of old named the Moon, flower of Telperion in Valinor; and Anar the Fire-golden, fruit of Laurelin, they named the Sun. But the Noldor named them also Rana, the Wayward, and Vasa, the Heart of Fire, that awakens and consumes; for the Sun was set as a sign for the awakening of Men and the waning of the Elves, but the Moon cherishes their memory.

The Silmarillion chapter 11 (6th paragraph)

October 11th this year marked the 20th anniversary of the beginning of the filming of Sir Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Ring trilogy.
St. Augustine, in his commentary on the Psalms which you can find online, says it's figurative.   You can read more here at the bulleted point 7:

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/1801121.htm
(10-14-2019, 11:20 AM)JacafamalaRedux Wrote: [ -> ]
Quote:[1] I have lifted up my eyes to the mountains, from whence help shall come to me. ... [2] My help is from the Lord, who made heaven and earth. ... [3] May he not suffer thy foot to be moved: neither let him slumber that keepeth thee. ... [4] Behold he shall neither slumber nor sleep, that keepeth Israel. ... [5] The Lord is thy keeper, the Lord is thy protection upon thy right hand.

... [6] The sun shall not burn thee by day: nor the moon by night. ... [7] The Lord keepeth thee from all evil: may the Lord keep thy soul. ... [8] May the Lord keep thy coming in and thy going out; from henceforth now and for ever.


What does that mean? How does the moon burn? Thanks. Edit: that's Psalm 120, not 20.


 The sun gives light (reflects) to the moon, and that is how the moon gives us light in the darkness of night. 
St Augustine compares Christ to the sun which enlightens His Church, the moon. So by His Light the Church sees Light. When a person is bothered by something (scandalized by it) he withdraws from it, like a man withdraws from something that burns him. When a person is scandalized by Christ, that person withdraws from Him the Sun. If a man is scandalized by something in the Church (the moon), he withdraws from the moon.
In other words, it is a blessing if you are not scandalized (burned) by what Christ says or by what the Church says.
That is the explanation of St Augustine.
I forgot to mention the simpler literal explanation, which I read in a commentary. People of old used to think that the moon rays can harm them, just like the sun rays do. So he is saying God will protect from the burning of the sun during the day and the moon during the night. Also, in certain areas of Israel, it gets very cold at night. If you couple that with high winds, one can get frostbites. One of the symptoms of frostbite is a burning sensation.