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I would have been nodding up and down (and looking) in total agreement if I was in the room when Marilyn Monroe said: “I believe that everything happens for a reason. People change so that you can learn to let go, things go wrong so that you appreciate them when they’re right, you believe lies so you eventually learn to trust no one but yourself, and sometimes good things fall apart so better things can fall together.”

Searching this phrase I have to hand it to Fr. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin for nailing it pretty good --if that is possible: In the final analysis, the questions of why bad things happen to good people transmutes itself into some very different questions, no longer asking why something happened, but asking how we will respond, what we intend to do now that it happened.

Life has revealed many things to me in the past 2 years. I'm still quite hopeful for happiness and becoming a saint (better not settle for Purgatory I've been told), but if Purgatory is much much worse than the last 2 years I definitely don't want to end up there. But if so I'll still be popping the champagne cork, because I'll know that the best thing that could happen will!

Anyway is it Catholic to think that: everything happens for a reason --I really want to know.

God bless, and Mary keep all of you here on FishEaters!
Yep.   I have to go over this again at least once a year to make sure....

Short free online pdf version of Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence!

http://www.saintsbooks.net/books/Fr.%20J...idence.pdf
Trustful Surrender to Divine Providence, one of the best ever. A monsignor I know always has his copy with him.
Yes. I have born witness many times. Even if I don't see it in the moment, when I recall it later, I know God was acting there.
(01-25-2020, 06:05 PM)chalkunbroken Wrote: [ -> ]Searching this phrase I have to hand it to Fr. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin for nailing it pretty good --if that is possible: In the final analysis, the questions of why bad things happen to good people transmutes itself into some very different questions, no longer asking why something happened, but asking how we will respond, what we intend to do now that it happened.

I'd be careful about Teilhard de Chardin who was condemned for theological error, and was suspected of heresy. His works were condemned and prohibited by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (the called the Holy Office), and that decree approved specifically and directly by Pope John XXIII.

The relevant decree was published 30 June 1962 :

Quote:Admonition

Several works of Fr. Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, some of which were published posthumously, are being edited and receiving considerable support.

Refraining from a judgment in that which concerns the positive sciences, it is quite evident that in philosophical and theological matters the mentioned works are filled with ambiguities and even serious errors that offend Catholic doctrine.

For this reason, the Most Eminent and Most Reverend Fathers of the Supreme and Sacred Congregation of the Holy Office exhort all Ordinaries as well as the Superiors of Religious Institutes, Rectors of Seminaries and Directors of Universities, to protect minds, particularly of the youth, against the dangers of the works of Fr. Teilhard de Chardin and his associates.

Given at Rome, from the Palace of the Holy Office, on the 30th day of June, 1962.

The encyclical letter of Pius XII, Humani Generis, while not explicitly naming him, was intended to condemn Teilhard's evolutionary theories and erroneous theology as well as the errors of Fr Henri de Lubac, and the "New Theology".

Hence, while even a broken clock might be right twice a day, it's still a bad idea to rely on it. I'd avoid Teilhard like the plague, were I you.
I submit this answer to someone more expertly on the topic.
I also would like input on my answer.

Does everything happen for a reason? I would say yes, but likely by degree.
God is omnipotent and sovereign, and whatever He wills will come to be.

We also know that God does not author sin. However, God can indeed withdraw His grace to allow someone to continue in sin, and, God willing, return to God in Penance.

Here’s where I personally find things get a little more fuzzy.
This is not so much to do with everything “happening for a reason”, but more to do with God’s PERMITTING things, rather than Willing/foreordaining absolutely everything that happens.

For instance, take every professional wrestling storyline that’s ever been written. That’s the work of man’s will, but permitted by God, as far as I can tell. How about the “sophisticated” arguments by atheistic philosophers. God clearly does author these things, but PERMITS men to do them.

However, that’s not your question. Do they exist in time for a reason? I would say yes, definitely. We may just not know why. God’s mind is reflected in the very external reality around us.

I think the best attitude to have is to see all things / suffering (apart from willful sins) as actual graces, that can work together for good for those that love God.

Again, this is not necessarily the opinion of the Church. Any errors here are mine.