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A priest asked me in confession if I knew the Divine Mercy Chaplet, but I do not have it memorized, so he gave me another penance. 

I could not at this time in good conscience recite this chaplet, not without clarification on a certain point, and when I've sought answers from Catholics regarding this matter, they say things like, that the Father suffers, or that the divinity of the Son is distinct from that of the Father!

How does it make sense to offer the divinity of the Son to the Father when the Father and Son are consubstantial in divinity?  Would this not mean that we are offering the Father the Father's divinity?  What exactly does this mean?

I understand offering the body and blood to the Father, the humanity, for the Father has no humanity.  But how can I offer the Father his divinity, and what does this even mean?

I have not heard defenses of this prayer that were orthodox.  But perhaps I am missing something. 

I don't object to this chaplet for its emphasis on mercy, as some do.  I am not a Jansenist.

But I much prefer the Sacred Heart chaplet and plan to commit a version of it to memory. 

I am glad the priest did not assign the Divine Mercy chaplet as penance.  I tend to say Eastern prayers aimed at preparing me to receive the sacrament, or traditional Roman devotions, and I trust in Christ's mercy, but I will not at this time say the Eternal Father unless I can understand it in an orthodox way.

I have only heard it defended with heresy.
I am not a fan of the devotion, so won't defend it's orthodoxy, except to say that given its obvious connection to the Eucharist, and quoting of the Council of Trent in the prayer, and that Our Lord Jesus Christ did not offer merely his body and soul as The Sacrifice, but His whole Person, and that is a Divine Person with a Human and Divine Nature, I fail to see where there is heresy here. Ambiguity, indeed, but not heresy.

I would object to the suggestion that those of us who do find in it an over-emphasis on the universal mercy without clear emphasis on the need for reparation as "Jansenist".

I would also remind you that you need not accept any penance if you find it too difficult or objectionable. It is imposed and assigned, but you also must accept it for it to be given. You are always welcome to suggest to the priest that, given your particular devotion to the Sacred Heart you would like to be assigned a certain number of Litanies of the Sacred Heart or Chaplets of the Sacred Heart instead, if that is possible, since it would accord with your existing practice more.
(02-03-2020, 06:56 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: [ -> ]I am not a fan of the devotion, so won't defend it's orthodoxy, except to say that given its obvious connection to the Eucharist, and quoting of the Council of Trent in the prayer, and that Our Lord Jesus Christ did not offer merely his body and soul as The Sacrifice, but His whole Person, and that is a Divine Person with a Human and Divine Nature, I fail to see where there is heresy here. Ambiguity, indeed, but not heresy.

I would object to the suggestion that those of us who do find in it an over-emphasis on the universal mercy without clear emphasis on the need for reparation as "Jansenist".

I would also remind you that you need not accept any penance if you find it too difficult or objectionable. It is imposed and assigned, but you also must accept it for it to be given. You are always welcome to suggest to the priest that, given your particular devotion to the Sacred Heart you would like to be assigned a certain number of Litanies of the Sacred Heart or Chaplets of the Sacred Heart instead, if that is possible, since it would accord with your existing practice more.

I would clarify that I did not claim any particular person with their objections is Jansenist.  I'm just saying, I'm not one.

Jesus' divinity was present in his self-offering and is present in the mass.  This is not the same as offering the Father the Father's divinity as far as I can tell, and I still don't know what it means.
I have kind of a bias against the devotion, so take what I say with some caution.

I personally don't care for the Divine Mercy devotion. It over-emphasizes God's mercy to spiritually unhealthy degrees, and I find it redundant when the Sacred Heart devotion already exists in a widespread manner in the Church, which also emphasizes God's mercy. There's also a lot of heterodox things in Sr. Faustina's diary, such as her 'vision' of the Eucharist comically jumping out of the tabernacle and her severe fixation on becoming a noted saint in her convent. There's just something spiritually disordered about Sr. Faustina when you read what Doctors of the Church, such as Sts. Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross, wrote regarding Divine Union. She comes across as way too fixated on human respect.

I think the prayers in themselves are fine and orthodox. But, again, there's older devotions out there like the Sacred Heart or the Eastern Jesus Prayer which accomplish the same thing without over-emphasizing one of God's qualities over others.
I do not like the devotion at all. I was taught that God is “a spirit, infinitely perfect.”  What is an “infinitely perfect” spirit?  One who has infinitely perfect attributes. How can the Divine Mercy devotion’s claim that God’s greatest attribute is mercy be reconciled with that concept?  Pope St. John Paul II’s encyclical “Dives in Misericordiae” explains this, but it doesn’t go far enough. Personally, I think that encyclical is more of an attempt to present something from his homeland to the Universal Church than anything else. Is that a bad thing?  Not necessarily. Who says the pope can’t be human? It’s a problem, however, when the devotion from his homeland that he chose has possible flaws in its most fundamental underlying philosophical and theological assumptions.
(02-03-2020, 07:04 PM)Augustinian Wrote: [ -> ]I think the prayers in themselves are fine and orthodox. But, again, there's older devotions out there like the Sacred Heart or the Eastern Jesus Prayer which accomplish the same thing without over-emphasizing one of God's qualities over others.

If the prayers were meaningful and orthodox, I could say them.  I'm just not sure that part of the Eternal Father prayer even means anything, which wouldn't quite make it heretical, but it would still offend my conscience. 

I agree that the Sacred Heart devotions and the Jesus prayer are very fitting and emphasize both mercy and contrition.
It's a very powerful prayer for the dying.
A user here named guacamole once wrote that she had a devotion to the wrath of God.  She even proposed a set of wrathful mysteries of the rosary.
(02-03-2020, 07:32 PM)Credidi Propter Wrote: [ -> ]I do not like the devotion at all. I was taught that God is “a spirit, infinitely perfect.”  What is an “infinitely perfect” spirit?  One who has infinitely perfect attributes. How can the Divine Mercy devotion’s claim that God’s greatest attribute is mercy be reconciled with that concept?

What are you talking about? Read my signature quotes, of course His greatest attribute is mercy, what else do you call our Lords Passion and Death? A stumbling block for the Jews and folly to the Gentiles.

His Passion and Death is not 'just' at all.

Romans 5:6-11 Wrote:6 While we were yet helpless, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. 7 Why, one will hardly die for a righteous man—though perhaps for a good man one will dare even to die. 8 But God shows his love for us in that while we were yet sinners Christ died for us. 9 Since, therefore, we are now justified by his blood, much more shall we be saved by him from the wrath of God. 10 For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God by the death of his Son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life. 11 Not only so, but we also rejoice in God through our Lord Jesus Christ, through whom we have now received our reconciliation.

The Divine Mercy Chaplet is so powerful because we cover ourselves in Christ's Passion and Death and thus His greatest attribute of Mercy.

(02-03-2020, 06:33 PM)everbecoming2007 Wrote: [ -> ]How does it make sense to offer the divinity of the Son to the Father when the Father and Son are consubstantial in divinity? 

How does it make sense for Jesus to pray to the Father when the Father and Him are one? It's also likely in reference to the Holy Eucharist (Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity) and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

"For the sake of His sorrowful passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world"

God Bless You
(02-03-2020, 07:45 PM)Clare Brigid Wrote: [ -> ]A user here named guacamole once wrote that she had a devotion to the wrath of God.  She even proposed a set of wrathful mysteries of the rosary.

Not gonna lie, that sounds metal.  :chainsaw:

Edit:
Quote:guacamole

just some thoughts

the wrathful mysteries of the holy rosary!

1.  jesus curses the fig tree

2.  jesus cleanses the temple

3.  the veil of the temple is torn in two

4.  jesus reprimands thomas

5.  the last judgment and the eternal suffering of the damned

Yeah, these are pretty metal. :Ozzy:
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