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From the National Catholic Reporter (link to archive.org):


Nationalist event in Rome warns against 'pink police state,' Pope Francis
Feb 4, 2020
by Joshua J. McElwee PeoplePoliticsWorld

The National Conservatism event gets underway Feb. 4 in the ballroom of Rome’s Grand Hotel Plaza. (NCR photo/Joshua J. McElwee)

ROME — A coalition of right-wing nationalist groups from six countries met here Feb. 4 for a daylong conference that mixed clarion calls against the alleged "hegemonic progressivism" of the world's multilateral institutions with occasional warnings about Pope Francis' vision for the Catholic Church.

Among the speakers were the head of Italy's most conservative political party, the well-known niece of the leader of France's, and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, whose antidemocratic reforms have led to him being called Europe's most autocratic ruler.

In the ornate marbled and frescoed ballroom of the Grand Hotel Plaza, located about a half-hour walk east of the Vatican in Rome's historic center, presenters focused most heavily on highlighting supposed parallels between today's progressive movements and communist regimes of old.

 
Opening the event, U.S. author Rod Dreher warned that survivors of Europe's former communist regimes were "trying to sound the alarm" about the rise of a "pink police state."

Dreher, an Orthodox Christian who gained wide public notice for his 2017 book The Benedict Option, which proposed that Christians should widely withdraw from wider society, laced his talk with a number of catchphrases.

Social justice, he said, is "a utopian political cult." An atmosphere of political correctness in the U.S., he added, makes it appear as if "the entire country is becoming a university campus."

Another speaker was Roberto de Mattei, an Italian historian and traditionalist Catholic known for his frequent criticisms of Francis, who said the pontiff had "renounced being a spiritual leader" in order to focus more on political and social issues, such as global climate change.

"Pope Francis has become the political leader of the international left," said de Mattei, making reference to Francis' 2015 encyclical, "Laudato Si', on Care for Our Common Home."

Quote:How sickeningly true that sentence is... "Pope Francis has become the political leader of the international left."
 
The Feb. 4 conference carried the title "God, Honor, Country: President Ronald Reagan, Pope John Paul II, and the Freedom of Nations." It was organized by National Conservatism, a project of the Netherlands-based Edmund Burke Foundation.

Among other sponsors: the U.K.'s Bow Group, the Netherlands' Center for European Renewal, Hungary's Danube Institute, Israel's Herzl Institute, the United States' International Reagan Thatcher Society, and Italy's Nazione Futura.

Several prominent Catholic theologians criticized the event's invocation of the name of the deceased Polish pope.
 
Quote:Which "prominent Catholic theologians" will we hear from, I wonder.... I bet the first one will have a name that begins with an F and ends in a vowel...
  
Massimo Faggioli, a historian and theologian at Villanova University, asked on Twitter: "I wonder how much electricity can be generated with John Paul II who turns in his grave seeing this nationalist cabal gathered and usurping [his] name."
 
Quote:I am good!
 
Stephen Schneck, a longtime politics professor at the Catholic University of America, said the ideology being proposed "directly contradicts" the church's social teachings.

Quote:Really? Which teachings would they be?
 
"Whether promoting racial and ethnic purity, hatred of migrants, or strongman demagoguery, this is a politics that is utterly opposite what the church calls us to be as Christians in the world," Schneck, who now leads the Franciscan Action Network, told NCR.

Quote:I betcha $100 that not a single person said anything about "racial purity" or "hating" immigrants, about whom Aquinas had much to say
 
Event organizers had told journalists they were expecting an overflow crowd for the conference, and had denied accreditation to a number of outlets, including several major wire services, citing a lack of space. The ballroom, which is described online as being able to seat 400 people, was about three-quarters full.

The smaller-than-expected attendance might have been due to last-minute changes in the event program. Matteo Salvini, the controversial leader of Italy's anti-migrant Lega Nord party and a former deputy prime minister, announced the day beforehand that he would not be able to give a keynote address as previously planned.
 
Giorgia Meloni, head of the Brothers of Italy, a smaller minority party that has advocated using the Italian navy to blockade migrant arrivals, spoke to participants in a session closed to the press the evening before the main event.

Organizers had also originally said that the U.S. ambassador to the Holy See, Callista Gingrich, would be attending with her husband, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich. A spokesperson for the U.S. embassy told NCR that the two "never agreed" to take part in the event and had requested their names be removed from the program.

Included among the attendees was Alexander Tschugguel, a traditionalist Catholic who gained notoriety last fall when he claimed to be the person who took wooden statues from a Rome-area church during the Synod of Bishops for the Amazon region and threw them in the Tiber River.

Tschugguel said he decided to come to Rome for the event because he wants to "connect Catholics who want to stand up and fight for traditional Catholic faith." The young activist, however, did express some reservations.

"When I saw that there would be a conference on national conservativism, I was interested — even though for me as an Austrian as soon as I hear the word nationalism it always rings big bells," he said. "As an Austrian traditionalist, I am very much against nationalism."

Quote:Wonder what Tschugguel means by the word "nationalism." By my definition, it only makes sense.

[Joshua J. McElwee (jmcelwee@ncronline.org) is NCR Vatican correspondent. Follow him on Twitter: @joshjmac.]
(02-04-2020, 02:52 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: [ -> ]"Whether promoting racial and ethnic purity, hatred of migrants, or strongman demagoguery, this is a politics that is utterly opposite what the church calls us to be as Christians in the world," Schneck, who now leads the Franciscan Action Network, told NCR.

Thou shalt not bear false witness.
(02-04-2020, 02:52 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: [ -> ]Wonder what Tschugguel means by the word "nationalism." By my definition, it only makes sense.

I assume he means by it what every traditional European reactionary and conservative means by it, the radical left wing, revolutionary doctrine, invented by the French Revolution. The European concept of 'nationalism', at least for the past couple of centuries, is summed up in the chorus of the Revolutionary anthem, La Marseillaise, 'Let us water the furrows with the impure blood of the foreigner'. It is a doctrine that destroyed the Old Order, led to war after war in the 19th century, weakening, and ultimately destroying the bastion of  Catholicism, the Austrian Empire (he is an Austrian, after all), and to the great bloodlettings of 1914-1918 and 1939-1945. Not something most European traditional conservatives, especially central European ones, look at fondly.
Then, apparently, the German language needs a new word -- one that describes someone who wants to preserve his nation's sovereignty, keep the ability of his people to pass down their way of life to their children, and not let his nation get swallowed up by the globalist agenda. 'Cause if that's what "Nazism" is, then 'heil Hitler.'

-- and that's what's frustrating about the Left's shoving anyone who can be described that way into the "FarRightExtremist" and "Nazi" category. Tell people what they are, and, often, that's what they become. They obviously *want* Nazis.
They have a word for it, which they freely use. It's Patiotismus, meaning love of the Fatherland. It's just that they realise that 'nationalism' is an extreme left-wing, racist ideology (see the chorus of the French Revolutionary anthem, above), and they are suspicious of anyone who calls themselves a 'nationalist'.

Nationalism destroyed not only the Austrian Empire, but the Papal States, subjecting Italy to Freemasonry. It destroyed the sovereignty of the Catholic South German States, Bavaria et. al, placing them in subjection to the very anti-Catholic Prussians. It is not something an European Catholic has any reason to like.

It also has tended to be very egalitarian, once it has defined 'nationality'. Suspicious of hierarchy and anti-aristocratic.

European Catholics on the right are funny. They expect the leaders of movements seeking their support to at least pay lip service to the Church. The Rosary waving Salvini is divorced, and is on his third 'domestic partner' in ten years. Marine le Pen is twice divorced, but at least she's still on her first 'domestic partner'. Her niece, Marion Maréchal, is divorced. She doesn't seem to have found a 'domestic partner' yet, but she's only 30.

I would say that these are at least a few of the reasons that Baron von Tschugguel is suspicious of 'nationalism'.
(02-06-2020, 06:50 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]They have a word for it, which they freely use. It's Patiotismus, meaning love of the Fatherland. It's just that they realise that 'nationalism' is an extreme left-wing, racist ideology (see the chorus of the French Revolutionary anthem, above), and they are suspicious of anyone who calls themselves a 'nationalist'.

Nationalism destroyed not only the Austrian Empire, but the Papal States, subjecting Italy to Freemasonry. It destroyed the sovereignty of the Catholic South German States, Bavaria et. al, placing them in subjection to the very anti-Catholic Prussians. It is not something an European Catholic has any reason to like.

It also has tended to be very egalitarian, once it has defined 'nationality'. Suspicious of hierarchy and anti-aristocratic.

European Catholics on the right are funny. They expect the leaders of movements seeking their support to at least pay lip service to the Church. The Rosary waving Salvini is divorced, and is on his third 'domestic partner' in ten years. Marine le Pen is twice divorced, but at least she's still on her first 'domestic partner'. Her niece, Marion Maréchal, is divorced. She doesn't seem to have found a 'domestic partner' yet, but she's only 30.

I would say that these are at least a few of the reasons that Baron von Tschugguel is suspicious of 'nationalism'.

                                                  We've also had Catholics in Ireland and Poland, some of whom were priests, who were staunch nationalists who had no desire to live under a monarch, whether they were Protestant, Orthodox, or even Catholic.
(02-07-2020, 12:03 PM)Eric F Wrote: [ -> ]                                                 We've also had Catholics in Ireland and Poland, some of whom were priests, who were staunch nationalists who had no desire to live under a monarch, whether they were Protestant, Orthodox, or even Catholic.

True. However, whilst nationalism in protestant countries was often monarchist, in Catholic countries it tended to be republican. Both Ireland and Poland were outliers, since there was no obvious, established Royal House to restore. Most European traditional conservatives agree with His Holiness Pope Pius VI, who said,
Quote:In fact, after having abolished the monarchy, the best of all governments, [the French Revolution] had transferred all the public power to the people - the people... ever easy to deceive and to lead into every excess.
Oh, and I left out its opposition to subsidiarity in government. In France it destroyed the Provinces, replacing them with cookie cutter 'Departments'. In Italy of course, it destroyed all the independent States and subjected them to Rome and the House of Savoy. The one thing nationalism, in the sense that Baron von Tschugguel understands it, cannot stand is any sort of federalism, regionalism, or local control.

As an example, there is a story about a French Minister of Education who, one day, looked at his watch. He exclaimed, 'It's two o'clock. Every student in France who is in cours élémentaire 2 is writing an essay on the beauties of spring.'