FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: What was your religious background?
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3
(02-08-2020, 10:57 AM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote: [ -> ]"I wish I could find data on this in the wider trad movement. How many of us were raised Catholic, how many in the post-V2 era, and how many have reverted or laterally moved to TLM as well as converted?"

Perhaps someone would draw up a poll.

From what I understand, doing even a poll of the traditional Catholic movement would be expensive and time consuming.  The problem is how decentralized the movement is.  Many TLM communities don't have websites, are not easily found, etc.  In order to get an accurate sample, you'd need to find as many communities as you can to select your representative sample from.  It wouldn't be an easy task.  The so-called "Official Traditional Catholic Directory," which is not official and is run by Sedevacantists, appears to be the most comprehensive listing of TLMs out there (they include non-Sedevacantists in the list but warn against attending them) but a researcher would still need to verify the accuracy and completeness, or near-completeness, of their list.  They'd then have to make contact with each community and try to get a list of members or attendees in order to draw their representative sample for the poll.  Time and money, in other words.  Lots of time and money, in fact.  That's why there isn't any solid data on the traditional Catholic movement and won't be for quite a long time.
(02-08-2020, 11:22 AM)SeekerofChrist Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-08-2020, 10:57 AM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote: [ -> ]"I wish I could find data on this in the wider trad movement. How many of us were raised Catholic, how many in the post-V2 era, and how many have reverted or laterally moved to TLM as well as converted?"

Perhaps someone would draw up a poll.

From what I understand, doing even a poll of the traditional Catholic movement would be expensive and time consuming. The problem is how decentralized the movement is. That's why there isn't any solid data on the traditional Catholic movement and won't be for quite a long time.
I wonder if a sociologist of religion might take this on? (Where are you now, Fr. Andrew Greeley (!)?) On a related theme, a recent convert to Catholicism, a prolific British professor, has followed up acclaimed studies of secularism and atheism with his 2019 book. It's more data-driven than narrative, from Oxford UP, but it examines the fallout the past half-century in England and the U.S. as to Catholic participation or alienation.

"Over fifty years on, however, the statistics speak for themselves. In America, only 15% of cradle Catholics say that they attend Mass on a weekly basis; meanwhile, 35% no longer even tick the 'Catholic box' on surveys. In Britain, the signs are direr still. Of those raised Catholic, just 13% still attend Mass weekly, and 37% say they have 'no religion'. But is this all the fault of Vatican II, and its runaway reforms? Or are wider social, cultural, and moral forces primarily to blame? Catholicism is not the only Christian group to have suffered serious declines since the 1960s. If anything Catholics exhibit higher church attendance, and better retention, than most Protestant churches do. If Vatican II is not the cause of Catholicism's crisis, might it instead be the secret to its comparative success?" (from publisher's blurb)

Mass Exodus: Catholic Disaffiliation in Britain and America since Vatican II
  • Offers the first serious historical and sociological study of Catholic lapsation and disaffiliation
  • Draws on a wide range of theological, historical, and sociological sources to offers a comparative study of secularization across two famously contrasting religious cultures: Britain and the USA
  • Features never-before-published analyses of nationally representative datasets and other significant statistics
  • Provides a thought-provoking reappraisal of the success/failure of the reforms following Vatican II, on their own terms
    Stephen Bullivant is Professor of Theology and the Sociology of Religion at St Mary's University, London. He is Director of the Benedict XVI Centre for Religion and Society. An award-winning scholar, Bullivant's research and teaching interests are wide-ranging and interdisciplinary. Most notably, they include several areas of Catholic theology, and the social-scientific study of religion and atheism/secularity. His publications include The Oxford Dictionary of Atheism (co-authored with Lois Lee; 2016), The Oxford Handbook of Atheism (co-edited with Michael Ruse; 2016), The Trinity: How Not to Be a Heretic (2015), and The Salvation of Atheists and Catholic Dogmatic Theology (2012).
"The problem is how decentralized the movement is."

Surely also one of its greatest strengths, and to my thinking a sign of the widespread inspiration of the Holy Spirit. Traditionalists as a whole are not easily manipulated.

As it now appears premature and even unworkable, I do withdraw the suggestion. But it would be good to know. 
There are millennials here!!!! That’s what struck my husband and I when we first started attending TLM a couple months ago—there are so many people of our generation going! And they have babies!! Lots of babies!!

Cradle Catholic. Wandered around starting in college because Catholicism got attacked by various professors at my SUPER left-wing college, and I was a doofus at defending the Church. But then I was completely dissatisfied by every alternative for the next five or so years. And I mean like, every. I was a scientist until I went into the Navy so I was very thorough in my research. A few years ago, for whatever reason, I started reading the complete works of St John of the Cross. I prayed that God would make me His friend. St John is right—God will answer that prayer so be ready for your life to change! The process for me needed to be painful. I have many sinful habits that have needed to be burned away.

I’d had a traumatic sexual assault experience as a girl, and it left me with tinges of Manichaeism-like opinions (my body as sinful, shameful, and a source of pain). Funny enough, donning a veil the first time brought me to tears, because that, combined with the birth of my child, made me see my body in a new light—as something sacred and life-bringing. God works with woman in an amazing way, and I get to celebrate that as a Catholic. No where else are women so valued for what they are born uniquely able to do.

The more I study our faith, the more I love it and am convinced of its truths. Our history, our liturgy, our devotions...Christ and His Church are intoxicating. I have received such a gift to have access to the Eucharist and the glory of the Catholic Church.
Pages: 1 2 3