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Okay, I went to a thrift store and found a book. As I was checking out the book, I found a St. Benedict Prayer Card as a bookmark, and it seemed cooler than the book, so I put this in my pocket but put the book back. Was this stealing? It wasn't what they were selling, but it would be different than taking a post it note out of the book, since this holds more value. Please be honest, did I sin?
It's bothering you, so do something about it. It seems like it wouldn't take much to set it straight. And then go to confession.
(02-08-2020, 10:11 PM)poeticcatholic Wrote: [ -> ]Okay, I went to a thrift store and found a book. As I was checking out the book, I found a St. Benedict Prayer Card as a bookmark, and it seemed cooler than the book, so I put this in my pocket but put the book back. Was this stealing? It wasn't what they were selling, but it would be different than taking a post it note out of the book, since this holds more value. Please be honest, did I sin?

When you find things in a book -
best to buy the book & contents.

Bibles are worth flipping through just to see what the former owner had left in them. Most people do put personal items in their bibles and sad to say when they die the children do sometimes donate them to thrift stores. If it's an india paper bible (becoming rare) it could be a good investment, (if you need a incentive to buy a bible for the prayer cards).

India paper, also known as bible paper or oxford paper, measures a 1,000 pages per inch, so as to make a compact bible, and usually are bound in leather.

As far as if it's a sin or not its hard to say but it's definitely dishonest in my opinion
(02-09-2020, 12:01 AM)Blind Horus Wrote: [ -> ]Bibles are worth flipping through just to see what the former owner had left in them. Most people do put personal items in their bibles and sad to say when they die the children do sometimes donate them to thrift stores.

All books are worth flipping through. My wife has an eBay store for which, several years ago, we were buying books to resell. We had gotten to know a consignment auctioneer who would often be overstocked on books that hadn't sold at auction and the consignee didn't want back. We would buy them for $1.00 a beer flat (the cardboard tray four six packs are shipped in). One trip to Butler, Missouri where he was located, we bought so many books that the back of my van (the seats had been removed) was so full that the C&SH said I'd better not stop suddenly or we would be crushed by the books shifting forward.

One evening I came home from work and she handed me a book that we had bought. She said, take a look at this. I glanced at the title. It was some 1950s psychobabble about how to be a great salesman, or something like that. I started to hand it back  She said, no, flip through it.

I did. I found $1252.00. There were twelve hundred dollar bills, one fifty, and a two dollar bill. Obviously, grandma didn't trust the bank, and the family couldn't be bothered to check her books. The auctioneer no longer had any idea who had consigned the book. Once the consignee indicated they didn't want the books back, they just went on his general book table, until he was so overstocked he'd call us.

We gave him some of the money, but he said he didn't deserve it because he hadn't checked either and we had bought it fair and square.
(02-09-2020, 01:22 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]
(02-09-2020, 12:01 AM)Blind Horus Wrote: [ -> ]Bibles are worth flipping through just to see what the former owner had left in them. Most people do put personal items in their bibles and sad to say when they die the children do sometimes donate them to thrift stores.

All books are worth flipping through. My wife has an eBay store for which, several years ago, we were buying books to resell. We had gotten to know a consignment auctioneer who would often be overstocked on books that hadn't sold at auction and the consignee didn't want back. We would buy them for $1.00 a beer flat (the cardboard tray four six packs are shipped in). One trip to Butler, Missouri where he was located, we bought so many books that the back of my van (the seats had been removed) was so full that the C&SH said I'd better not stop suddenly or we would be crushed by the books shifting forward.

One evening I came home from work and she handed me a book that we had bought. She said, take a look at this. I glanced at the title. It was some 1950s psychobabble about how to be a great salesman, or something like that. I started to hand it back  She said, no, flip through it.

I did. I found $1252.00. There were twelve hundred dollar bills, one fifty, and a two dollar bill. Obviously, grandma didn't trust the bank, and the family couldn't be bothered to check her books. The auctioneer no longer had any idea who had consigned the book. Once the consignee indicated they didn't want the books back, they just went on his general book table, until he was so overstocked he'd call us.

We gave him some of the money, but he said he didn't deserve it because he hadn't checked either and we had bought it fair and square.
So I read that aloud to my smarter-half

..."sounds like he almost blew it, too" 
(light-heartly)

..."I just dont understand; why can't men listen?" 
(spoken looking at me) 

All I can say is  WOW!
(02-09-2020, 02:52 AM)Blind Horus Wrote: [ -> ]So I read that aloud to my smarter-half

..."sounds like he almost blew it, too" 
(light-heartly)

..."I just dont understand; why can't men listen?" 
(spoken looking at me) 

All I can say is  WOW!

WOMEN! Can't live with 'em and can't live without 'em! :LOL:
Don't worry about it.  The bookmark wasn't what was for sale, and taking it didn't damage the book.  Had a worker found it, they probably would have just thrown it away.  What would a used bookmark be worth?  At most, probably a quarter.
I feel like it wasn't stealing since it didn't belong to anyone at that point.
Poetic, I know the feeling you're talking about.

Did you look to see if anyone was watching when you took it?
It is worth noting that theft is the taking of something which does not belong to you, against the reasonable will of the owner.

So, if one is truly starving, and someone who has extra food refuses to give at least some, it would not be theft to take what one needs, provided it does not significantly harm the owner. It is not reasonable to refuse alms to someone is severe need. So taking is not against the reasonable will of the owner.

Similarly, the card would not seems to be particularly valuable, nor would it have increased or decreased the value of the book. It was owned by the bookseller, but it also is not likely to be against the reasonable will of the owner, so probably is not theft, strictly speaking.

A good way to solve this problem and determine this would be to go to the shop with the card, find a book you do want to purchase, take it to the counter and say you will probably buy this book, but in another you found this card, and since it was just a marker, but you liked it was wondering if the owner wouldn't mind if you had it. That will solve your problem and not "out" your taking. If he says no, then it give you a chance to return it without revealing your taking as well.

Of course that is a mental reservation. You did find it in another book, but the natural understanding will be that it has always been in the shop. You don't have to correct that notion.

If we do cause an injustice, we have a duty to repair, but never have to reveal our sin in order to repair. Restitution can be given anonymously and secretly.

That all said, I don't think that's necessary, since it is probably not against the reasonable will of the owner, certainly its taking something, but if you want to clear your conscience of this, that's one way.
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