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Due to fear of Coronavirus https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/...irus-57048

                                        What are your opinions on this ?  I think this is wrong, because The Gospel of St John in the 6th chapter, tells us.  This is the bread which cometh down from heaven; that if any man eat of it, he may not die. I am the living bread which came down from heaven. [52] If any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever; and the bread that I will give, is my flesh, for the life of the world.
(02-17-2020, 02:30 PM)Eric F Wrote: [ -> ]Due to fear of Coronavirus https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/...irus-57048

                                        What are your opinions on this ?  I think this is wrong, because The Gospel of St John in the 6th chapter, tells us.  This is the bread which cometh down from heaven; that if any man eat of it, he may not die. I am the living bread which came down from heaven. [52] If any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever; and the bread that I will give, is my flesh, for the life of the world.
It's a dumb reason, IMO. If this actually helped stopped the spread of Corona virus, then we wouldn't have an epidemic at this point. The Eucharist is offered for both healing of soul and body.
(02-17-2020, 02:46 PM)newenglandsun Wrote: [ -> ]It's a dumb reason, IMO. If this actually helped stopped the spread of Corona virus, then we wouldn't have an epidemic at this point. The Eucharist is offered for both healing of soul and body.

That doesn't mean it can't spread further.

But the Eucharist is not the point of Mass. We go to Mass to worship God, not primarily to receive Communion. There's no requirement to receive, and we're required to go even if we can't receive for some reason. We also can't expect it to prevent bodily illness, as if it will magically protect us from disease.
As Paul says, the point of Mass is the Sacrifice of Christ renewed, and our obligation is to be present at it when not morally or physically impeded. There is only an obligation again, if not morally or physically impeded, to receive Communion once a year during the "Easter season" (usually from the First Sunday of Lent to Trinity Sunday).

So, while it is good to make frequent Communions the Mass is not Communion, and one can fully participate in a Mass without receiving Communion.

An epidemic where contagion is possible through simple congregating would certainly justify Church authorities to for a time, cease offering public Masses and absolve people from the obligation to attend Mass or civil authorities to prohibit people from congregating together, even for Mass. It would not be justified to refuse private sacraments. It would also not be just to prohibit priests from caring for the dying. Pastors have an obligation in justice to risk their lives to bring the sacraments to their faithful. In such a case it might be more practical in a place of contagion that some priests voluntarily take on to expose themselves and stay in the isolated areas among the sick in order to avoid spreading the disease.

The Bread of Life gives eternal life, it is not meant to be, nor is it an anti-viral drug. Prudence is always necessary.

Is there some nefarious thing behind this? Perhaps, but there is also something prudent about at least some restrictions on Masses and communal gatherings.

*Edited to Add :

The third commandment is the Divine Positive Law here in play which demands that on a particular day each week that we sanctify this day by some kind of activities. The Divine Law does not set what is to be done. Because all who are conscious and know it is this day (Sunday) can do something, it binds all everywhere.

Mass attendance on Sunday or Holy Days is a human (ecclesiastical) law which means it admits of exceptions, and certainly for a serious reason, could be dispensed. This human law only specifies the Divine Law as to what we are normally to do. It cannot take into account all circumstances, so admits of exceptions which are foreseen and thus dispensed by the authority, or which are unforeseen and would through the principle of epikeia reasonably be dispensed.

What would be wrong is to deny the sacraments to those who reasonably ask for them, especially those which are necessary (like Baptism and Confession) or to those who are dying or in serious danger of death.
They could still have Mass and skip the distribution of Communion, if need be. But okay, I guess we'll just close the worship of God altogether...
Churches remained open during the Black Death of the 14th Century. I seriously doubt this is worse.
(02-17-2020, 07:50 PM)Augustinian Wrote: [ -> ]They could still have Mass and skip the distribution of Communion, if need be. But okay, I guess we'll just close the worship of God altogether...

The problem's large groups of people together, not distributing Communion.
(02-17-2020, 08:30 PM)Eric F Wrote: [ -> ]Churches remained open during the Black Death of the 14th Century. I seriously doubt this is worse.

Perhaps, although I'd bet it's hard to back up that claim. If you'd like to cite relevant articles or evidence, go right ahead.

Still two things are quite different with plague :

Firstly, medical and scientific advances have clearly identified vectors for the spread of disease in general and certain diseases in particular. This was not clear in the 14th century. The existence of microscopic organisms which caused disease and the means of transmission between humans, and from animals to humans, etc. was unknown. Now that it is known, it can be much more effectively prevented, and of course, if a disease is easily spread by human-to-human transmission or via aerosols, then there is every reason to prevent large gathering of people in which some might be exposed or infected. That is especially the case when the disease is transmittable before symptoms appears, as is the case with Covid-19.

Secondly, bubonic plague is not easily transmitted human-to-human, because the bacteria cannot easily become aerosolized unless there is pneumonic symptoms associated, and the bacteria is coughed out. Since the bacteria is much larger than a virus, it does not stay airborne very long, so only close contact with pneumoniacs would give the chance of an infection. It cannot easily pass into the blood through contact, either, meaning that the main transmission method is only going to be fleas. So even if there were a massive pandemic of plague, there would be no point in preventing large gatherings of people, only excluding those with a cough. Plague victims who were well-enough to walk about could do so without much risk of transmission.

That provides an answer to your implied question. Covid-19 is worse in a certain way. Firstly, plague is readily treated and contained, especially today. It killed as many as it did in the 14th century because of the medicine of the time, and because of the living conditions.

Compare with Covid-19 and within two months of the first reported infection, over 70,000 people have become infected and there are nearing 2,000 deaths, and the numbers, if plotted show an curve which is increasing. There is a good test case for how infectious and contagious the disease is human-to-human as well, with the Diamond Princess cruise ship quarantine. One man from Hong Kong who was on board for five days became sick and tested positive for Covid-19. His presence on the ship has led to over 450 cases of the disease among the 3700 people who may have been exposed. Among those cases nearly 200 are asymptomatic, meaning they show not outward signs of infection, but can transmit the disease.
There may be an additional dynamic at work here. This past Sunday in an N.O. parish we frequent, an appeal was made before Mass for more lay volunteers in the various ministries including EMHCs. A sudden drop-off has occurred, and the priests are worried they will have to distribute Holy Communion by themselves.
(02-17-2020, 11:43 PM)Teresa Agrorum Wrote: [ -> ]A sudden drop-off has occurred, and the priests are worried they will have to distribute Holy Communion by themselves.

Oh no, the horror! :sobstory:
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