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Since it's the Lenten season, I've been really fixated on Our Lord's Passion. Far more than in the past. And today, while praying the Sorrowful Mysteries, I realized something that was a minor revelation to me, but may be mundane, or obvious, to you. It has to do with prayer and the sheer perfection of that moment on Calvary, and how the two are inseparable. (Forgive me for a blog-post)

Here's what I realized; when my prayers are offered up to God, they don't simply float into Heaven or the Divine Ear, but they are offered to Christ during His Passion. I’m probably wrong, but given that the Mass is Calvary, the prayers we offer from all throughout time during every Holy Mass are united to Christ's sacrifice on Calvary. And as the Mass is the liturgical union with Christ’s Passion, it is no stretch to believe that since we are absorbed in that eternal moment, so are our prayers. 

Therefore, when I appeal for Christ’s mercy, it is not as though He is simply sitting on a cloud above me with His ear to the earth, but that my prayers ascend to Him in eternity. And since His Divinity is just as eternal now as it was on the cross, my petition for mercy was heard as He suffered. In particular, His prayer to the Father to ‘forgive them, for they know not what they do' [Luke 23:34] can be read as a momentary prayer applicable in time to His enemies; but is also applicable above time in eternity for all who have, are and ever will offend God. So in that moment that He sought the Father’s mercy, He had my soul in mind and offered up my own prayers for Divine Mercy while on the cross. The same goes for any prayers and petitions during Mass, they ascend as incense into eternity, where the Second Person of the Trinity hears them as He also suffers and dies on Calvary. 

It is a profound moment, and I now have a much deeper understanding as to why so many saints emphasize meditation on the Passion above all other mysteries of Christ’s earthly life. Calvary is the sole, eternal sacrifice for all sin, and the sole, eternal offering of all prayers. It is not morbid to reflect on these mysteries, as some critics tend to deride Catholic fixation on His Passion and death; because that moment was the completion of the Perfect Sacrifice to the Father. No moment in history before or after that point can merit more grace than the Crucifixion.

So, I guess in essence, what I'm saying is that all prayers of the faithful from all time go through the Passion to the Father.

[Image: 539px-Leon_Bonnat_-_The_Crucifixion.jpg]
This has changed the way I pray.
I just went to the Stations. We used the form St Alphonsus Liguori wrote. They are a powerful reminder.
Starting at Septugessima this year have been reading the Blessed Anne Emmerich's vision's of the Passion, this has helped my prayer life with both the station and rosary. The details contained in the visions help my wandering mind while praying.

Once the Passion is complete will probably read her visions of out Blessed Mother's life.
(03-05-2020, 06:59 AM)CopiosaApudEumRedemptio Wrote: [ -> ]Starting at Septugessima this year have been reading the Blessed Anne Emmerich's vision's of the Passion, this has helped my prayer life with both the station and rosary. The details contained in the visions help my wandering mind while praying.

Once the Passion is complete will probably read her visions of out Blessed Mother's life.

I've actually found myself reading her visions for the first time over the past few weeks. They're really powerful and I can see where Mel Gibson drew his inspiration for the Passion of Christ movie.
(03-04-2020, 11:29 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: [ -> ]I just went to the Stations. We used the form St Alphonsus Liguori wrote. They are a powerful reminder.

Just back from the same. As you say you leave with a lot to meditate about.