FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums

Full Version: La Palma volcano (Canary Islands) activity update: Yellow alert for Cumbre Vieja Volc
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Update, uploaded at approx. 23.30 CST 9 October.

(09-27-2021, 09:40 PM)Zedta Wrote: [ -> ]Curious: There was a big EQ on the Isle of Crete and the volcanoes stopped, not slowed down...stopped. Crete is on the African plate and so is La Palma. Not long afterwards, the eruptions continued at near the same intensity.
Curious, this morning I heard myself say: 'like Zedta said', and I thought to myself 'that rhymes'
I heard on a radio show last night, that the earth has been mostly silent for 24 hours, as in NO Earthquakes. The geologist said that the Tectonic Plates appear to have stopped. He speculated that pressure was building and what was once a continuous movement will have to soon restart, but when that happens, it could be a whimper or a series of very large EQs. It brings to mind what one of the visionaries of Fatima said, that she was shown an angel, with a flaming sword, being held back by Our Lady, from touching the center of the earth and causing great calamities. Could this be a prelude to the angel's act being now allowed?

Who knows. But it does give one pause to wonder.

Here's is a live video of La Palma's volcano. The island's government has issued a warning that the residents, still on the island, should be alert to the risk of a 6.0+ EQ at any time. Apparently, pressure is building from pent up steam, created by magma, filling areas where there are large pockets of water. If pressure is released, the explosion of that steam will be horrendous. Cubic liter, for cubic liter of water, turned instantly into steam, creates huge volumes of steam.

Things are rapidly deteriorating on the island today.

Video feed here:
(10-22-2021, 01:50 PM)Zedta Wrote: [ -> ]I heard on a radio show last night, that the earth has been mostly silent for 24 hours, as in NO Earthquakes. The geologist said that the Tectonic Plates appear to have stopped. He speculated that pressure was building and what was once a continuous movement will have to soon restart, but when that happens, it could be a whimper or a series of very large EQs. It brings to mind what one of the visionaries of Fatima said, that she was shown an angel, with a flaming sword, being held back by Our Lady, from touching the center of the earth and causing great calamities. Could this be a prelude to the angel's act being now allowed?

Who knows. But it does give one pause to wonder.

Here's is a live video of La Palma's volcano. The island's government has issued a warning that the residents, still on the island, should be alert to the risk of a 6.0+ EQ at any time. Apparently, pressure is building from pent up steam, created by magma, filling areas where there are large pockets of water. If pressure is released, the explosion of that steam will be horrendous. Cubic liter, for cubic liter of water, turned instantly into steam, creates huge volumes of steam.

Things are rapidly deteriorating on the island today.

Video feed here:
New Zealand Prime minister  just got shook during press conference, (second time in a day), Philippines just got a hard jolt & Alberta Canada just hit with second largest quake in their history. All within the last hour.

Dutchsinse sez: watchout when the plates stop moving (California)
Just checked my sources and this one had a good and a bit scary update. Scary for me, anyway (here in Florida) and about 65 million others living near or on the East Coast of North America, into the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Islands...generally. The volcano activity has ramped up and spread over island and EQs are nearly continuous and a 'gap' has opened on an area at the side of the 'slide zone'.

Go 'HERE' to view pics and full story. They didn't transfer well here.

Article Reports Wrote:UPDATE 2:58 PM (See Bottom) -- Word Directly from LaPalma: Steam Coming out of ground on other side of island; near constant earthquakes. We're frightened
NewsDesk
4-5 minutes

Word is coming out about the ongoing volcano eruption, directly from people on the island of LaPalma, Canary Islands, Atlantic Ocean, off the northwest coast of Africa and it is not good.

One resident writes "We are on the other side of the island from the volcano and steam is coming out of the ground here!  Areas of ground are showing 8+ inches of lift, earth quakes are minutes apart, over 110 since midnight, never ending low shaking. For the first time, we're frightened."
Yesterday, this web site reported that a total of FIVE vents were now open and spewing lava on the volcano, a major increase in activity as seen below:

Today, we can show that a new, gaping, hole is forming to the left of the left-most vent:

The photo above also shows the marked increase in steam (downslope to the right) emanating from the ground, proving that a significant source of water is now intruding into the volcano.  This steam is a new development.  It has not really been seen in this area throughout the long lava flow.  Where it came from and how much more is involved, is a huge question.  Enough water could cause a gigantic steam explosion.
Clearly the situation on LaPalma is worsening.
 
People on the U.S. east coast are URGED to pay close attention to developments there, because if things go to their worst, a slab of unstable land, the size of Manhattan Island New York City, is already slipping off the southwest flank of this island, and may slide into the Atlantic Ocean.
If that happens, a Tsunami will be generated that scientists say can hit the US east coast seven to eight hours later, with 30 meter to 50 meter waves crashing ashore.  Those would be waves about 100-164 FEET tall!

They would wipe out most of the major cities on the US east coast, and smash the United States economy back to almost the Stone Age, for decades.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) did a study on this potential disaster and their study asserts they can expect sixty-five MILLION dead from such an event.

YOU don't want to be one of those.

Have your car gassed up.  Have a plan about WHERE you would evacuate to and how you would get there.  Have an ALTERNATE ROUTE in case the first way is blocked.  Have a "Go-Bag" for each member of your family, pre-packed with clothes, underwear, socks, belts shoes, deodorant/soap/shampoo, toothpaste and any medicines you need.

If you hear that the landslide has taken place and a Tsunami is actually on its way, LEAVE IMMEDIATELY.  Don't wait for government to tell you because once the government tells the masses, it will be chaos.

You know how traffic is at rush hour; you can't move.   Now try to imagine it's not just people getting out of work, but rather EVERYONE fleeing for their lives.   It will be instant grid lock.

People will go berserk; it may turn into a Mad Max situation on the roads as terrified people drive over, under, and through anything in their way. 
You don't want to be stuck in that.  So leave immediately once you hear a landslide happened, and hopefully, you'll reach safety long before the masses panic.


UPDATE 2:58 PM EDT --
As the sun was setting on LaPalma Friday evening, TV cameras suddenly picked up what appears to be a burst of STEAM emanating from the ridge, above and to the south of the present eruption.

This ridge is part of the old volcano system which erupted in 1949 and again in 1971.  Here is what could be seen on the TV camera:

It is not known if this is steam or a rogue cloud coming over the ridge.  The sky has been mostly cloudless all day, so a cloud does not make sense.
If this is steam, then lava has already made it well far up the main ridge which forms the "spine" of the island.   That spine has numerous remnants of old vents from prior eruptions, and is directly connected to and above, the unstable land mass that scientists fear will slide into the Atlantic, creating a tsunami.

We are awaiting clarification of this is steam or a cloud.
Back in the last century, Tesla was working on a device in his Manhattan apartment lab. It was a kind or resonator that tended to build intensity as it ran. It began to shake the ground so violently that the police were called to his lab and destroyed his device, before it wrecked havoc on the building and neighborhood. Tesla's EQ resonating device worked...a bit too well from its infancy.



Today, much of his technological feats have been modified and tuned to become real life threats. Russia and the USA were able to seize much of his work after his death.



Could what is going on at La Palma be 'artificially' induced? It does seem quite the coincidental event. Now there are some pictorial overlays that tend to support this idea. In nature, things tend to be random...no straight lines or angles.



Check out these screenshots:



https://halturnerradioshow.com/index.php...ial-attack






This has a bad odor about it and it ain't sulfur dioxide from the volcano.

I tried to link directly to the photos, but it is blocked, so you'll have to go to the article itself to see this. It is quite compellingly obvious as to its artificiality.
Well, that's all kinda scary!

Here's something a little less scary from the USGS.  I know...it's "the gummint" and its trustworthiness might be questionable.

The weirdness and quite possible intentionality of the "event" as displayed by the grid pattern of eq's above notwithstanding ...

Quote:https://www.usgs.gov/center-news/volcano...arry-water

Volcano Watch — The Canary Islands “mega-tsunami” hypothesis, and why it doesn’t carry water
Release Date: October 21, 2021
The recent eruption on La Palma, in the Canary Islands, has stimulated speculation that the volcano might collapse, creating a tsunami that would devastate the east coast of North and South America. But is such a scenario possible or likely?
Volcano Watch is a weekly article and activity update written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. 
[Image: lapla_ma.jpg]
La Palma is a basaltic shield volcano in the Canary Islands. Like Hawaiian volcanoes, La Palma typically erupts lava flows. This aerial photo, courtesy of Radio Televisión Canaria, shows lava flows that are being generated by a fissure eruption upslope on La Palma. One of the lava flows is entering the ocean, creating new land called a lava delta. Lava deltas are built by the accumulation of lava near the base of the sea cliff at an ocean entry.

“Volcano Watchers” are probably aware that an eruption began on La Palma in the Canary Islands on September 19. The eruption style is similar to Hawaiian eruptions, and both locations share the potential for flank collapse and tsunami.

Basaltic ocean islands, such as the Island of Hawai‘i and the Canary Islands, tend to experience catastrophic landslides every few hundred thousand years—a discovery first made by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Jim Moore in the early 1960s! A significant portion of an island is removed during collapse and has the potential to displace tremendous amounts of seawater, generating local tsunami waves that are thought to be over 100 meters (300 feet) high. From this understanding grew a notion that collapsing volcanoes—particularly in the Canary Islands—could generate ocean-wide “mega-tsunami.”

In 2001, an academic paper suggested that collapse of La Palma could result in tsunami waves up to 25 m (about 80 feet) high along the east coasts of North and South America. This scenario made headlines in the media, which inaccurately depicted a huge wave devastating New York City.

But can collapses actually generate these “mega-tsunami” far from their sources? Subsequent research casts doubt on this idea.

The Canary Islands “mega-tsunami” scenario assumed a single, coherent, massive collapse block that reached a high velocity very quickly. Ocean floor mapping surrounding the Canary Islands, however, indicates that collapses instead occur in incremental or piecemeal fashion. In addition, geomorphologists found, via slope stability analysis, that the potential collapse volume is much smaller than was simulated by the 2001 paper.

Tsunami modeling has also advanced considerably since 2001. Studies of landslide-induced waves show that they travel at different speeds and interact more across long distances, leading to smaller wave height far from their sources. Better knowledge of ocean bathymetry, island and coastal topography, and the transfer of energy between slide blocks and water also contributed to more accurate modeling.

These new simulations suggest that the maximum wave height along the east coast of the Americas from a “worst-case scenario” collapse of La Palma would be on the order of 1-2 m (3-7 feet)—still hazardous, but similar to common storm surge.

A lack of geologic evidence also calls the “mega-tsunami” hypothesis into question. Tsunami leave characteristic sediment deposits on the coastlines they impact. But no such deposit has ever been identified on the east coasts of North and South America.

Collapses of Canary Island volcanoes are rare, occurring on timescales of hundreds of thousands of years, and should be preceded by signs of flank instability: increases in earthquakes and ground surface deformation. Canary Island volcanoes also erupt regularly—La Palma last erupted in 1971 and 1949—and slope stability analyses conducted at La Palma indicate that the structure is stable. The volcano would have to grow significantly before a collapse was likely.

This abundant evidence refutes the “mega-tsunami” hypothesis, demonstrating that it does not hold up to rigorous examination. However, tsunami that are generated by volcanoes are a real process and a significant threat. For example, the 1883 explosive eruption of Krakatau, in Indonesia, caused a local tsunami that killed tens of thousands on nearby coastlines. In 2018, a smaller eruption and collapse of Anak Krakatau, an island which grew in the 1883 caldera, also resulted in a local tsunami that killed hundreds.

Local tsunami can also be generated by other volcanic processes. On the Island of Hawai‘i, lava delta collapse at lava-ocean entries can cause small tsunami that impact areas adjacent to the delta. Slip on the fault underlying Kīlauea’s south flank, associated with M7–8 earthquakes, caused local tsunami in 1868 and 1975 that took lives. These are processes that have happened repeatedly in human history; they will happen again, and their associated hazards deserve our attention.

While the scientific view of the “mega-tsunami” hypothesis has evolved in the years since 2001, that original work led others to start investigations that contributed new knowledge that advanced our understanding of landslides and tsunami generated by volcanoes. In this way, the story is a marvelous example of exactly how science happens!
Isn't the USGS (United States Geological Survey) more in the business of finding resources (oil) then volcano type stuff? which may skew results (such as their early denials of fracking causing EQs) - :
++++++++++++++
The La Palma Lava Delta

the tsunami may be wishful thinking
++++++++++++++
P.S. I'm noticing troll-ish behavior coming out of the Washington District of Columbia digital bureaucrats now days. Sad
(10-24-2021, 03:43 PM)Blind Horus Wrote: [ -> ]Isn't the USGS (United States Geological Survey) more in the business of finding resources (oil) then volcano type stuff? which may skew results (such as their early denials of fracking causing EQs) - :
++++++++++++++
++++++++++++++
P.S. I'm noticing troll-ish behavior coming out of the Washington District of Columbia digital bureaucrats now days. Sad
I really couldn't say.  I imagine they're interested in both.  But even if you're right, does that make them wrong about their assessment?

Given what's happened in the world the past few years, with almost everything being politicized and/or commercialized to varying degrees, it's hard to know who to trust and who not to.  So, yeah...results can be and often are skewed.

Don't know what you mean by your p.s.
Quote:Could what is going on at La Palma be 'artificially' induced? It does seem quite the coincidental event. Now there are some pictorial overlays that tend to support this idea. In nature, things tend to be random...no straight lines or angles.


The grids are a rendering error
Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8