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being vegetarian - fantasy_forever - 07-21-2008

what does the Catholic Church say about vegetarians?



being vegetarian - DarkKnight - 07-21-2008

[Image: pointandlaff.gif]They're delicious with a little Hollandaise sauce.

Seriously, there are Catholics that somehow have discovered an Eleventh Commandment that requires them to be Vegetarian. Notice the emphasis, it doesn't apply to the rest of us.

There are various saints and aesthetics that incorporated vegetarianism, but most follow the teaching of the apostles as it relates to clean/unclean meat. Even John the Baptist, who followed one of the most extreme diets recorded in scripture, ate locusts for protein.



being vegetarian - Paloma - 07-21-2008


From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

2415
The seventh commandment enjoins respect for the integrity of creation. Animals, like plants and inanimate beings, are by nature destined for the common good of past, present, and future humanity.195 Use of the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives. Man's dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute; it is limited by concern for the quality of life of his neighbor, including generations to come; it requires a religious respect for the integrity of creation.196

2416
Animals are God's creatures. He surrounds them with his providential care. By their mere existence they bless him and give him glory.197 Thus men owe them kindness. We should recall the gentleness with which saints like St. Francis of Assisi or St. Philip Neri treated animals.

2417
God entrusted animals to the stewardship of those whom he created in his own image.198 Hence it is legitimate to use animals for food and clothing. They may be domesticated to help man in his work and leisure. Medical and scientific experimentation on animals is a morally acceptable practice if it remains within reasonable limits and contributes to caring for or saving human lives.

2418
It is contrary to human dignity to cause animals to suffer or die needlessly. It is likewise unworthy to spend money on them that should as a priority go to the relief of human misery. One can love animals; one should not direct to them the affection due only to persons.




being vegetarian - Paloma - 07-21-2008

DarkKnight Wrote:Even John the Baptist, who followed one of the most extreme diets recorded in scripture, ate locusts for protein.

Really? I thought the vow he had taken (though I'm not sure if that is factual) had prohibited him from touching anything dead. Grapes were forbidden too. :huh?:

My love of reggae music has led to a fascination with the "Nazirite Vow."


btw, I go back and forth between being a vegetarian and eating meat. I try not get nutty about it since I think people do it just so they can label themselves as something. I was even vegan for a good while, until I got chronic, nasty flu-like symptoms that disappeared only when I caved in and slowly ate a full-fat greek style yogurt and a carne asada burrito. Some raw food enthusiast tried to tell me it was because my body was "detoxing." Really, it just confirmed to me that even the most well planned vegan diet is totally unnatural and unhealthy.

However, I think vegetarianism is perfectly fine.


being vegetarian - Tinuviel - 07-21-2008

Sometimes I'm sort of vegetarian just because it can be cheaper and easier. I've never been very deliberate about it though. I don't eat a whole lot of beef, partly because I just like chicken and fish better, and partly because beef can be pretty inefficient and expensive to produce.

I start to feel kind of lethargic if I go for too long without eating meat. I always wonder how exactly vegetarians manage to get enough healthy calories (i.e., not just putting cheese on everything...) to maintain energy, especially those who have a fast metabolism.





being vegetarian - Historian - 07-21-2008

Man has dominion over the animals and thus can use it as he see fits, as long as he doesn't 'abuse' what is available to him too much.



being vegetarian - Historian - 07-21-2008

It would depend on your motivations for being vegetarian. 

If a person decides to be vegetarian because they equalize humans and animals, then its a falacious argument: God gave man dominion over all the Earth.

If a person decides to be vegetarian because they dislike corporate farming and the way that animals are treated before slaughter, then there would be no problem: dominion implies stewardship and Paloma lines out the argument nicely.

If a person decides to be vegetarian because they are worried about nutritional aspects or GM meat or whatever, then it's not a matter of Catholic principles and enjoy your lettuce.

Caveat: choosing vegetarianism because of the humane treatment of animals could also be only looking at half the story.  The National Catholic Rural Life Conference address this topic.  Their big premise is that "Eating is a Moral Act" and issues like fair treatment of agricultural workers, envrionmental issues, fair labeling and country-of-origin statements are all rights of eaters and producers.  It doesn't stop with Bessy the cow, moral eating also concerns itself with Old MacDonald.



being vegetarian - Theresa - 07-24-2008

Quote:" Really, it just confirmed to me that even the most well planned vegan diet is totally unnatural and unhealthy.

Well,.... not really.  I don't think so, anyway.    I know strict, contemplate Carmelites who are vegetarian.    And many such religious live very lengthy lives.

I believe it was mentioned in the book, The Mystical City of God, by M. Agreda, that our Lady ate no red meat, only some fish at times.

It has even been speculated that it was only after the Fall that the blood of animals was to be spilled in order to nourish man.

Quote:It would depend on your motivations for being vegetarian

I would agree with the above.  The Carmelites I mentioned, do it as a form of penance.  Imagine not having tasted meat for 75+ years, as in the case of an elderly Carmelite I know.



being vegetarian - Montgisard - 10-10-2008

Quote: From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:
<i>2415
The seventh commandment enjoins respect for the integrity of creation. Animals, like plants and inanimate beings, are by nature destined for the common good of past, present, and future humanity.195 Use of the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives. Man's dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute;<b> it is limited by concern for the quality of life of his neighbor, including generations to come</b>; it requires <b>a religious respect</b> for the integrity of creation.196</i>
<i>
</i>
That sounds like environmentalist speak (quality of life, sustainability, religious respect for creation etc). I did not know environmentalism could be catholicized!



being vegetarian - jovan66102 - 10-10-2008

Montgisard Wrote:
Quote: From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:
<I>2415
The seventh commandment enjoins respect for the integrity of creation. Animals, like plants and inanimate beings, are by nature destined for the common good of past, present, and future humanity.195 Use of the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives. Man's dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute;<B> it is limited by concern for the quality of life of his neighbor, including generations to come</B>; it requires <B>a religious respect</B> for the integrity of creation.196</I>
<I>
</I>
That sounds like environmentalist speak (quality of life, sustainability, religious respect for creation etc). I did not know environmentalism could be catholicized!
 Far from needing to be 'catholicized', environmentalism began as a Catholic movement as pointed out by Oxford history professor Anna Bramwell in her histories of the movement. The prots and the socialists were all in the 'absolute dominion' camp while the Catholics, drawing on Scripture and the monastic experience were arguing for sustainability. Such men as Fr Fahey were in the forefront of the 'clean food' campaign as well.