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Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Printable Version

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Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Historian - 02-13-2009

<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Continued from: <a target="_blank" href="http://www.websitetoolbox.com/tool/post/apologia/vpost?id=3297064">curled ringlets of girls are hellish cords which bind the hearts of men</a>

Quote:And if women have to wear burqas so should the men. In fact let's have everyone wear burqas, including the children. We wouldn't want to tempt those child molesters, oh no.</div></div>

I would think so. Or everybody can wear something like this so that they can't look at people's faces: [Image: 32694.jpg]

 Edited to add:


<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Quote:And let's kind rid of all good tasting food, lest we all become gluttonus.</div></div>

I think that is a good idea, at least getting rid of junk foods. One could celebrate Feastdays by using fruits and other healthy food.

http://www.ewtn.com/library/CATECHSM/CATARS.htm
<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Quote:We may refrain from warming ourselves; if we are sitting uncomfortably, we need not try to place ourselves better; if we are walking in our garden, we may deprive ourselves of some fruit that we should like; in preparing the food, we need not eat the little bits that offer themselves; we may deprive ourselves of seeing something pretty, which attracts our eyes, especially in the streets of great towns. There is a gentleman who sometimes comes here. He wears two pairs of spectacles, that he may see nothing. . . . But some heads are always in motion, some eyes are always looking about. . . . When we are going along the streets, let us fix our eyes on Our Lord carrying His Cross before us; on the Blessed Virgin, who is looking at us; on our guardian angel, who is by our side. How beautiful is this interior life! It unites us with the good God. . . . Therefore, when the devil sees a soul that is seeking to attain to it, he tries to turn him aside from it by filling his imagination with a thousand fancies. A good Christian does not listen to that; he goes always forward in perfection, like a fish plunging into the depths of the sea. . . . As for us, Alas! we drag ourselves along like a leech in the mud.</div></div>

<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Quote:And get rid of blanket covers so we'll be cold in the morning and won't want to sleep in and be slothful.</div></div>

I found using thin blankets useful for getting up early.

<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Quote:We should get rid of any literature that isn't devotional and abstain from all entertainment. </div></div>

St. Alphonsus on Spiritual Reading:

Remember also that for you certain useless books, though not bad, will be pernicious; because they will make you lose the time that you can employ in occupations profitable to the soul. In a letter to his disciple Eustochium, St. Jerome stated for her instruction that in his solitude at Bethlehem he was attached to the works of Cicero, and frequently read them, and that he felt a certain disgust for pious books because their style was not polished. He was seized with a serious malady, in which he saw himself at the tribunal of Jesus Christ. The Lord said to him: "Tell me; what are you?" "I am," replied the saint, "a Christian." "No," rejoined the Judge, "you are a Ciceronian, not a Christian." He then commanded him to be instantly scourged. The saint promised to correct his fault, and having returned from the vision he found his shoulders livid and covered with wounds in consequence of the chastisement that he had received. Thenceforward he gave up the works of Cicero, and devoted himself to the reading of books of piety. It is true that in the works like those of Cicero we sometimes find useful sentiments; but the same St. Jerome wisely said in a letter to another disciple: "What need have you of seeking for a little gold in the midst of so much mire," when you can read pious books in which you may find all gold without any mire?

As the reading of bad books fills the mind with worldly and poisonous sentiments; so, on the other hand, the reading of pious works fills the soul with holy thoughts and good desires.

In the second place, the soul that is imbued with holy thoughts in reading is always prepared to banish internal temptations. The advice that St. Jerome gave to his disciple Salvina was: "Endeavor to have always in your hand a pious book, that with this shield you may defend yourself against bad thoughts."

As for entertainment if you read saints' lives that can be both entertaining and profitable for  your soul.

<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Quote:And wear blinders and not talk to each other so we don't gossip. </div></div>
Silence is important. I guess one could do something like that if one has a problem with keeping silence.
http://cathom.blogspot.com/2008/12/importance-of-silence.html

<div style="width: 90%; text-align: left;"><div style="margin-bottom: 2px;">Quote:Hell, why not just kill ourselves and get it over with!</div></div>
One would go to hell that way.



Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Historian - 02-13-2009

luig, private devotions are great, but making them seem necessary for others to follow is not good.

luigi Wrote:I would think so. Or everybody can wear something like this so that they can't look at people's faces:
The human body is a creation by God and we know not interfere with its function. The human face is a vital part of communication and should not be covered as part of Catholic modesty.

Quote:I think that is a good idea, at least getting rid of junk foods. One could celebrate Feastdays by using fruits and other healthy food.
There are health reasons for that, and it really says nothing about the original statement. Good tasting foods are by definition usually good for us. That is why they taste good.

Quote:I found using thin blankets useful for getting up early.
I've found the birds good for getting up early, although I often get up before them.

Risking hypothermia for this is not a good idea.

Quote:St. Alphonsus on Spiritual Reading:

Remember also that for you certain useless books, though not bad, will be pernicious; because they will make you lose the time that you can employ in occupations profitable to the soul.In a letter to his disciple Eustochium, St. Jerome stated for her instruction that in his solitude at Bethlehem he was attached to the works of Cicero, and frequently read them, and that he felt a certain disgust for pious books because their style was not polished. He was seized with a serious malady, in which he saw himself at the tribunal of Jesus Christ. The Lord said to him: "Tell me; what are you?" "I am," replied the saint, "a Christian." "No," rejoined the Judge, "you are a Ciceronian, not a Christian." He then commanded him to be instantly scourged. The saint promised to correct his fault, and having returned from the vision he found his shoulders livid and covered with wounds in consequence of the chastisement that he had received. Thenceforward he gave up the works of Cicero, and devoted himself to the reading of books of piety. It is true that in the works like those of Cicero we sometimes find useful sentiments; but the same St. Jerome wisely said in a letter to another disciple: "What need have you of seeking for a little gold in the midst of so much mire," when you can read pious books in which you may find all gold without any mire?

As the reading of bad books fills the mind with worldly and poisonous sentiments; so, on the other hand, the reading of pious works fills the soul with holy thoughts and good desires.

In the second place, the soul that is imbued with holy thoughts in reading is always prepared to banish internal temptations. The advice that St. Jerome gave to his disciple Salvina was: "Endeavor to have always in your hand a pious book, that with this shield you may defend yourself against bad thoughts."

As for entertainment if you read saints' lives that can be both entertaining and profitable for  your soul.

There is a difference between being attached to works and reading them. I routinely read books on various linguistic subjects in order to gain the knowledge they contain to better understand the things of God. I plan on reading the Bhagavad Gita soon in Hindi and it would be very wrong to hold it dear and find its wisdom most inspiring, but there is nothing wrong with reading it.



Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Historian - 02-13-2009

One always have better things to read than languages, unless if you are a missionary learning the natives' language or a seminarian learning Latin. St. Teresa forbade her nuns to study Latin because it's not useful for them.

St. Alphonsus on Spiritual Reading:

Remember also that for you certain useless books, though not bad, will be pernicious; because<b> they will make you lose the time</b> that you can employ in occupations profitable to the soul.

Quote:St. Theresa likewise forbade her Carmelite nuns to study Latin, or anything little suited to their state, and she declared herself desirous, in a letter written to the prioress of Seville, that her daughters living entirely apart from the world, should have the holy ambition of appearing simple and ignorant, as many saints have done, rather than of being female rhetoricians. http://cathom.blogspot.com/2009/01/human-science-exceedingly-wearisome-st.html




Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Marius - 02-13-2009

This brave new world of yours, Luigi, sounds more North Korean than Catholic, I'm afraid. ;)


Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Spooky - 02-13-2009

So....... no Dean Koontz? What about books on nursing because thats what I read last night.  If linguistics are a waste of time for someone studying them, then I guess books on nursing (breastfeeding) are too not being profitable to my soul.



Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Historian - 02-13-2009

Quote:The human face is a vital part of communication and should not be covered as part of Catholic modesty.

It's not so vital that it's worth taking the risk of being tempted by faces. There were many saints who functioned just fine without looking at people when talking.

St. Ignatius' example: <span class="Apple-style-span">
Quote:Father Manareo, when taking leave of St. Ignatius for a distant place, looked steadfastly in his face: for this look he was corrected by the saint. From the conduct of St. Ignatius on this occasion, we learn that it is not becoming in religious to fix their eyes on the countenance of a person even of the same sex, particularly when the person is young.

Also St. Alphonsus said: </span>
<pre style="font-family: verdana;"><span class="Apple-style-span">We should be persuaded that, <span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">in avoiding occasions of
this sin, </span><span class="Apple-style-span"><span class="Apple-style-span" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 153);">no caution can be too great.</span></span> Hence we must
be <span class="Apple-style-span">always fearful, and fly from them.
</span></span><span class="Apple-style-span">http://cathom.blogspot.com/2008/12/cast-your-eyes-down.html</span>
</pre>


Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - Historian - 02-13-2009

Spooky Wrote:So....... no Dean Koontz? What about books on nursing because thats what I read last night.  If linguistics are a waste of time for someone studying them, then I guess books on nursing (breastfeeding) are too not being profitable to my soul.

The point is that one should try to avoid things that are not suited to their state; hence learning languages for one who doesn't need to use them is a waste of time, in my opinion.



Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - miss_fluffy - 02-13-2009

The Church has always used objects to rid ourselves of occasions of sin.  Blessed objects such as the rosary, holy water fonts, crucifixes, home altars, etc.



Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - JacafamalaRedux - 02-13-2009

Well, it's not Catholic. I'm sorry to have to say this, but if I didn't know better Luigi, I'd think you were mocking the Faith in your first post here. That's all, plain and simple. You may have good intentions, but you're inventing your own traditions that have nothing what-so-ever to do with the holy Catholic Faith.

If I follow your line of logic, then I need to rid myself of all sacramentals: statues, holy cards, etc, that reveal faces.

Perhaps you shouldn't even be showing the Sacred and Immaculate hearts in your sig line, as they aren't covered?



Ridding ourselves of occasions of sin by use of objects - SCG - 02-13-2009

<FONT face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">
LaRoza Wrote:<B>The human face is a vital part of communication</B> ...
</FONT>
<FONT face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">Did you say that with a straight face?  I've got to know.  </FONT>
<FONT face="arial, helvetica, sans-serif">- Lisa</FONT>