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Bp W column, 7.4.09 - Printable Version

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Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - Gerard - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 09:44 PM)didishroom Wrote: Ah yes, it's been a while since His Excellency took the time to chide women for leaving their kitchens.....

When a woman stands before the judgement seat of God, He probably won't be congratulating her about her serve.  He will probably be asking her to justify her service.  Serving meals for a family is absolutely a greater act than serving tennis balls on a court.


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - veritatem_dilexisti - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 09:45 PM)Robhaidheuch Wrote: Andy Murray will win Wimbledon next year, when he improves his service game.

Yes, just like Tim Henman was going to win Wimbledon "next year" … ;)


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - didishroom - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 09:54 PM)Gerard Wrote:
(07-04-2009, 09:44 PM)didishroom Wrote: Ah yes, it's been a while since His Excellency took the time to chide women for leaving their kitchens.....

When a woman stands before the judgement seat of God, He probably won't be congratulating her about her serve.  He will probably be asking her to justify her service.  Serving meals for a family is absolutely a greater act than serving tennis balls on a court.

This is the problem-your prejudice. You're assuming that because a woman is a successful therefore she is doing in a rebellious act because she does not want to be a mother. Give me a break. ::) Not every woman is meant to be a mother or a mother right away.


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - Gerard - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 10:01 PM)didishroom Wrote:
(07-04-2009, 09:54 PM)Gerard Wrote:
(07-04-2009, 09:44 PM)didishroom Wrote: Ah yes, it's been a while since His Excellency took the time to chide women for leaving their kitchens.....

When a woman stands before the judgement seat of God, He probably won't be congratulating her about her serve.  He will probably be asking her to justify her service.  Serving meals for a family is absolutely a greater act than serving tennis balls on a court.

This is the problem-your prejudice. You're assuming that because a woman is a successful therefore she is doing in a rebellious act because she does not want to be a mother. Give me a break. ::) Not every woman is meant to be a mother or a mother right away.


No. I don't have a problem with prejudice.  And I certainly don't have a prejudice against motherhood or any maternal service based on what "success" is as the world defines it.  You however seem to.

I do however know that  the sanctity of professional tennis or other wastes of time and energy does not compare to the sanctity of a person participating fully in the life of the Church and the family and subsequently the community. 

As far as rebellious acts go, I don't believe those are the motivations.  I believe they more than likely are the motivations of those that fill the heads of these people/race horses  with narcissistic mush and  self-esteem problems in which they must be "the best" at all cost.  And they don't care that "the best" is really a wretched, perversion of a game which has been turned into a complete distraction from the essence of life.

As far as motherhood goes, often times, these people have made such a hash out of their reproductive systems they have to engage in more than one immoral act in order to satisfy their inevitable maternal cravings later on.  They've often abused their bodies for their sport and the natural sanction that God has built in is that they may not be able to concieve. 

God doesn't make anyone to be a tennis player, especially people who sacrifice their nature for an unnatural abuse of the sport for the sake of competition. 

I can't imagine a saintly woman having a vision and being told by God in the chapel.  "Go ye now and  work out in the gym for five hours. And later when you're on the court, watch your backhand, make sure you follow through without going off your center of gravity.  Oh, and the shorts are fine, but it would help the fan base if you showed a little more skin." 






Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - flannerywannabe - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 10:01 PM)didishroom Wrote: Not every woman is meant to be a mother or a mother right away.

Hear hear, didi. Especially considering the lack of suitable men in secular culture to responsibly father families. I think it's safe to say that if I were immersed in secular culture and held similar cultural views to my own but was without the Catholic faith or any inclination toward it, I would not only not be married, I would almost have given up the hunt for a decent man. And I wouldn't waste my life feeling tragic about it. I'd be cooking and serving those meals for my friends, a few hours a week; and I'd be doing something with my other talents the rest of the time.

As it is, as a Catholic, I see no contradiction between a woman serving her family -- and putting that first and highest -- and still being accomplished in some other field compatible with her vocation and circumstances. [Not discussing sports at the moment, leaving that aside for a tangent.] And here's maybe also a good place to mention that women in past times and other cultures are not and have never been expected to go it alone in this respect as they are now in America. Any middle-class woman, up until and to some degree throughout the world wars, would have had at least one maid to come in and help her with the chores, perhaps a cook or a handyman as well -- at least. As income levels rose, so would amount and degree of help; and while sometimes this could alienate a woman from her children (as in the tradition of nannies and governesses), it certainly need not if she didn't choose. Anyway, this woman would have been not only expected but encouraged to pursue charitable and cultural interests in the free time this gave her, and while she would have been expected to plan meals and run the household (in the sense of ordering what domestic work was to be done when and by whom), she definitely would not have been doing ALL the domestic work herself, as she so often is expected to do now, even while working full-time outside the home as well. True, most families now, the husband and children are also expected to pitch in a bit more; at least, in healthy families. There is definitely a "servant to the master" ethic for women in some evangelical Protestant circles which is  not humble but humiliating, which ends up with Mom being the exclusive scullery wench and maid-of-all-work while husband and children go blithely about the rest of the business of living, and which I do not think it is appropriate for Catholic women to adopt. I don't think anyone here has advocated it, but I think it's a danger we should be aware of and should avoid. In looking back to how things used to be for inspiration, it's best to have a clear and true picture on the screen before proceeding.

< /soapbox>

Anyway, my favorite illustration of how I think a woman's balance between career and family should be struck is probably this description of Lillian Gilbreth, the wife of Frank Gilbreth. Both Mr. and Mrs. were well-known and well-respected engineers and efficiency experts at the turn of the twentieth century. Using principles that the husband had developed, they went around to factories and helped the engineers there to speed production and minimize waste. They wrote books, gave lecture tours, the whole nine yards. After Frank's death, Lillian went on to continue her husband's work, out of economic necessity -- the family had eleven living children of twelve who were born. In the sequel to Cheaper by the Dozen, the famous book about their family, one of the youngest boys' schoolteachers is skeptical that Lillian can care properly for her children while working so hard, and interrogates little Jack as follows:

"What does your mother do, Jack?" she asked.
"Lots of things," said Jack.
"Like what, dear?"
"Well, she mends my socks, and serves the plates at the table, and gets me up in the morning, and tells me stories, and plays the piano so we can sing."
"But she can't do all that, Jack. Doesn't she have a career?"
"I don't think so."
"Why you know perfectly well she does," the teacher said accusingly.
"Well if she does," Jack shouted, "she never showed it to me."


;D


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - dedalus28 - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 05:51 PM)Anastasia Wrote: Yes, I think it's a fair comparison: it's the same game with the same basic rules, the same number of players, and the same equipment: the speed of the ball doesn't alter that. At what mile per hour does tennis stop being appropriate for women?

Sorry, I might have bolded that my main point there was not the speed of the serve but the shortness of clothing, which bears no resemblance to the Shakespearean reference you made.


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - CollegeCatholic - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 11:03 PM)Gerard Wrote: I can't imagine a saintly woman having a vision and being told by God in the chapel.  "Go ye now and  work out in the gym for five hours. And later when you're on the court, watch your backhand, make sure you follow through without going off your center of gravity.  Oh, and the shorts are fine, but it would help the fan base if you showed a little more skin." 

I can't imagine a saintly man having a vision and being told by God in the chapel "go and spend your time posting on an Internet forum."


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - didishroom - 07-04-2009

High five! CollegeCatholic!


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - veritatem_dilexisti - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 11:13 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote:
(07-04-2009, 11:03 PM)Gerard Wrote: I can't imagine a saintly woman having a vision and being told by God in the chapel.  "Go ye now and  work out in the gym for five hours. And later when you're on the court, watch your backhand, make sure you follow through without going off your center of gravity.  Oh, and the shorts are fine, but it would help the fan base if you showed a little more skin." 

I can't imagine a saintly man having a vision and being told by God in the chapel "go and spend your time posting on an Internet forum."

It happened to me. "Go forth," said the angel, "and spend your time on Fish Eaters." Then he flew away on his giant snail, and after that I woke up.


Re: Bp W column, 7.4.09 - CollegeCatholic - 07-04-2009

(07-04-2009, 11:18 PM)veritatem_dilexisti Wrote:
(07-04-2009, 11:13 PM)CollegeCatholic Wrote:
(07-04-2009, 11:03 PM)Gerard Wrote: I can't imagine a saintly woman having a vision and being told by God in the chapel.  "Go ye now and  work out in the gym for five hours. And later when you're on the court, watch your backhand, make sure you follow through without going off your center of gravity.  Oh, and the shorts are fine, but it would help the fan base if you showed a little more skin." 

I can't imagine a saintly man having a vision and being told by God in the chapel "go and spend your time posting on an Internet forum."

It happened to me. "Go forth," said the angel, "and spend your time on Fish Eaters." Then he flew away on his giant snail, and after that I woke up.

Lucky.