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What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - Printable Version

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What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - Augstine Baker - 04-28-2010

by Maximilian Hanlon

As an anglophile who has the highest hopes for the Personal Ordinariates envisioned by the Pope for the salvaging of all that’s good in Anglicanism and replanting it within the Roman Communion, a question keeps recurring among those Anglicans who are seriously contemplating taking the Holy Father up on his offer. In his Apostolic Constitution Anglicanorum Coetibus, Pope Benedict calls “the Anglican Patrimony” a “treasure to be shared” with the entire Church.(1) The difficulty for Anglicans, however, is that most are unsure what precisely “the Anglican Patrimony” (henceforth AP) is. Having discussed the matter at some lengths with some of the Anglicans and Episcopalians that I respect and having listened to the recordings of the latest conference on this subject that recently convened at Oxford University,(2) I would like to bring to your attention four possible, mutually enriching answers to this question. I encourage all of you who would like to pursue the matter further, to listen to the recordings of the conference in full to hear learned men with really posh accents bringing forth their answers to this question. In the meantime, here are the answers that seem to me to have the most validity:

1. The AP is a distinctive way of celebrating the liturgy which draws on The Book of Common Prayer for its inspiration and texts.

2. Closely connected to #1, the AP is the rich Anglican tradition of choral music.

3. The AP is a predominantly married clergy.

4. The AP is that position of privilege Anglicanism enjoys in England to re-evanglize and minister to society at large, afforded by establishment.

http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2010/04/what-is-anglican-patrimony-spoken-of-by.html


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - The_Harlequin_King - 04-28-2010

When used by Anglo-Catholics, "Anglican patrimony" is a code phrase for good taste.


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - Augstine Baker - 04-28-2010

(04-28-2010, 09:58 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: When used by Anglo-Catholics, "Anglican patrimony" is a code phrase for good taste.

Ouch!


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - cunctas_haereses - 04-28-2010

Wonder what Thomas More, John Fisher and the thousands more who met the same fate would have to say to us today about  'Anglican patrimony'.


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - The_Harlequin_King - 04-28-2010

Well, that is probably not what the Pope or the most serious Anglican-use Catholic people up top mean by the phrase..... but among the rank and file, that's pretty much what I'd boil it down to. It's that really unsettling reaction that Anglo-Catholics get when they walk into an ordinary Catholic church and are horrified by the mediocrity of the liturgy, music and architecture.

To a much lesser extent, this also applies to an Anglo-Catholic walking into some trad Catholic chapels where the architecture and vestments are still gaudy, but in the same sense as one's hypothetical grandmother's old ugly furniture. Same with chapels which use godforsaken music from the 18th and 19th centuries instead of chant or the really good stuff from Catholic patrimony.


cunctas_haereses Wrote:Wonder what Thomas More, John Fisher and the thousands more who met the same fate would have to say to us today about  'Anglican patrimony'.

Impossible to say, but virtually all Anglican-use Catholics hold a special place in their hearts for the martyrs of England. Thomas More is my confirmation saint.


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - Augstine Baker - 04-28-2010

(04-28-2010, 10:51 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Well, that is probably not what the Pope or the most serious Anglican-use Catholic people up top mean by the phrase..... but among the rank and file, that's pretty much what I'd boil it down to. It's that really unsettling reaction that Anglo-Catholics get when they walk into an ordinary Catholic church and are horrified by the mediocrity of the liturgy, music and architecture.

To a much lesser extent, this also applies to an Anglo-Catholic walking into some trad Catholic chapels where the architecture and vestments are still gaudy, but in the same sense as one's hypothetical grandmother's old ugly furniture. Same with chapels which use godforsaken music from the 18th and 19th centuries instead of chant or the really good stuff from Catholic patrimony.


cunctas_haereses Wrote:Wonder what Thomas More, John Fisher and the thousands more who met the same fate would have to say to us today about  'Anglican patrimony'.



Impossible to say, but virtually all Anglican-use Catholics hold a special place in their hearts for the martyrs of England. Thomas More is my confirmation saint.

Shepherd's Mass is an abysmal musical torment.


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - Tim - 04-28-2010

Bearing in mind Churchill's "we are one people divided by a common language" I'd wonder what Thomas More or John Fisher would say about the average American parish? Perhaps HH Pope Benedict XVI is hoping the Anglican-use Catholic's "good taste, good hymnody, good english usage" will make a difference in all of the English speaking world.
tim


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - glgas - 04-28-2010

(04-28-2010, 10:51 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: . Same with chapels which use godforsaken music from the 18th and 19th centuries instead of chant or the really good stuff from Catholic patrimony.

Do you know that the Gregorian chant practically dies out before the reformation turning into some kind of godforsaken  polyphony, and was revived only after 1880 by the monks of Solesmes and popularized only by St Pius X?

In Central Europe the folk songs turning to hymns were popular as Church songs, some of them dates back to the 16th Century, maybe earlier. Apparently in Western Europe the fear from protestantization prevented the vernacular songs, and poor quality low level polyphonic or high quality but orchestral artistic  music was the replacement.  The main problem whith this was that people became mere audience, instead of participants of the Holy Mass.


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - The_Harlequin_King - 04-28-2010

(04-28-2010, 11:42 AM)glgas Wrote: Do you know that the Gregorian chant practically dies out before the reformation turning into some kind of godforsaken  polyphony, and was revived only after 1880 by the monks of Solesmes and popularized only by St Pius X?

Yes. And by all indications, those few people who did sing chant in the 1500's onward probably made it sound terrible.


Re: What is the Anglican Patrimony spoken of by Pope Benedict? Part I - Resurrexi - 04-28-2010

(04-28-2010, 11:42 AM)glgas Wrote:
(04-28-2010, 10:51 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: . Same with chapels which use godforsaken music from the 18th and 19th centuries instead of chant or the really good stuff from Catholic patrimony.

Do you know that the Gregorian chant practically dies out before the reformation turning into some kind of godforsaken  polyphony, and was revived only after 1880 by the monks of Solesmes and popularized only by St Pius X?


Polyphony isn't Godforsaken.

"Classic Polyphony agrees admirably with Gregorian Chant, the supreme model of all sacred music, and hence it has been found worthy of a place side by side with Gregorian Chant, in the more solemn functions of the Church, such as those of the Pontifical Chapel. This, too, must therefore be restored largely in ecclesiastical functions, especially in the more important basilicas, in cathedrals, and in the churches and chapels of seminaries and other ecclesiastical institutions in which the necessary means are usually not lacking." (Pope St. Pius X, Tra le Sollecitudini, 4)