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Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - Printable Version

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Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - richness of tradition - 05-05-2010


I always remember reading this in a catholic publication.  True?




Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - cgraye - 05-05-2010

It's all relative, really.  If you commit a lot of mortal sins, it gets easier and easier.  Just like anything bad you do.  Or good, for that matter.  And it depends on the person.  Some people have difficulty with things with which other people have no difficulty.  If you train yourself and establish good habits, it may get hard to commit a mortal sin.  If you keep committing the same sins, it will get very easy to commit them again.


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - richness of tradition - 05-05-2010

Well it was in a publication for the scrupulous.  I think the idea was to stop worrying about mortal sins because it's very hard to commit them.
I've taken it to heart being scrupulous myself.




Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - glgas - 05-06-2010

The first one is hard. Then every repetition makes it easier and easier.


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - Historian - 05-06-2010

It depends, a sin is mortal if you know it's wrong but still do it. I commit a mortal sin if I decide to sleep in on Sunday instead of go to Mass. My cousins with catholic-in-name-only parents who don't even know what the term Holy Day of Obligation means don't commit a mortal sin because they miss Mass on Sundays.


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - SaintSebastian - 05-06-2010

Generally, if you try and live a devout life, you'll know when you have committed a mortal sin and lost the grace of God. If you have doubts, then you haven't. From St. Alphonsus Liguori's book on the Charity of Christ:

"Here it will be well to remark, what is unanimously admitted by all theologians, even of the rigorist school, that persons who have during a considerable period of time been leading a virtuous life, and live habitually in the fear of God, whenever they are in doubt, and are not certain whether they have given consent to a grievous sin, ought to be perfectly assured that they have not lost the Divine grace; for it is morally impossible that the will, confirmed in its good purposes for a considerable lapse of time, should on a sudden undergo so total a change as at once to consent to a mortal sin without clearly knowing it; the reason of it is, that mortal sin is so horrible a monster that it cannot possible enter a soul by which it has long been held in abhorrence, without her being fully aware of it. We have proved this at length in our Moral Theology. [lib. 6, D. 476.] St. Teresa said: No one is lost without knowing it; and no one is deceived without the will to be deceived. [life, addit.]"
http://www.freewebs.com/wallmell/LiguoriPracticeLove14.htm


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - SaintSebastian - 05-06-2010

(05-06-2010, 07:54 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: It depends, a sin is mortal if you know it's wrong but still do it. I commit a mortal sin if I decide to sleep in on Sunday instead of go to Mass. My cousins with catholic-in-name-only parents who don't even know what the term Holy Day of Obligation means don't commit a mortal sin because they miss Mass on Sundays.

Unless they are culpable for their ignorance through sloth, general disregard for truth, etc. Although, even then I'm not sure if missing Mass would be a mortal sin, or rather whether the ignorance itself is the sin.


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - ResiduumRevertetur - 05-06-2010

(05-06-2010, 08:08 AM)SaintSebastian Wrote:
(05-06-2010, 07:54 AM)Servus_Maria Wrote: It depends, a sin is mortal if you know it's wrong but still do it. I commit a mortal sin if I decide to sleep in on Sunday instead of go to Mass. My cousins with catholic-in-name-only parents who don't even know what the term Holy Day of Obligation means don't commit a mortal sin because they miss Mass on Sundays.

Unless they are culpable for their ignorance through sloth, general disregard for truth, etc. Although, even then I'm not sure if missing Mass would be a mortal sin, or rather whether the ignorance itself is the sin.
I wonder the same thing sometimes. I don't believe I'm very well formed on this subject and I would dearly love to be. Here, I've used this analogy before: Nancy Pelosi does not believe that she commits a mortal sin with her position on abortion. She lives in an age where, I believe, she actually IS ignorant. She's been "talked to", but she hasn't been (1) barred from the communion rail (okay, so to speak) or (2) excommunicated. The "Church" allows her to live comfortably in her sin. Ergo, she does not commit a mortal sin (?!) I, on the other hand, tend to scrupulosity and I believe I have committed a mortal sin by irreverence during the Consecration. I get hit by Nancy Pelosi leaving Mass and we both die. What happens to us? I think the "ignorance" thing makes it all a little tooooo spongy. In my mind, the claim of ignorance is a huge hurdle to cross and the kidos who didn't go to Mass on Sunday because they "didn't know any better" cannot be.


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - Historian - 05-06-2010

(05-05-2010, 11:24 PM)richness of tradition Wrote: I always remember reading this in a catholic publication.  True?

No, it is quite easy.

It is somewhat hard, considering that God is very forgiving and any transgression does not immediately result in damnation, but it is quite easy for man to commit such sins.

Regardless of the theology, in general, if one knows this, then a mortal sin is easy to commit. If one knows Truth, then there are few excuses.


Re: Is a mortal sin actually very hard to commit? - 3Sanctus - 05-06-2010

Trying to stay on topic with this question...

When does one begin to fail to "honor they father and they mother"?  To what degree must one comply with their wishes to keep from sinning?  Likewise, to what degree does one have to comply with their wishes for it to be a positive thing (as opposed to simply a lack of sin)?  How is this to be balanced with what you feel God wishes from you in your life - in generalities basically, not things like your parents asking you to commit fornication or some such nonsense.