FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums
French royalists celebrate ... - Printable Version

+- FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums)
+-- Forum: Church (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?fid=2)
+--- Forum: Catholicism (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?fid=10)
+--- Thread: French royalists celebrate ... (/showthread.php?tid=39261)

Pages: 1 2 3


Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Gilgamesh - 10-07-2010

(10-07-2010, 03:40 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: In the practical sphere, monarchies can probably only arise or be restored when countries are put in the same conditions those monarchies arose in... basically, the country in question needs to have undergone an apocalyptic cataclysm, and the pieces need to be put back together by warlords, among whom a king will rise.

In the religious sphere, however, the regal authority derives from God.  Authentic monarchy must come from the top down, not from the chaos up.  A warlord can rise to kingship, but any autocracy he may enjoy is strictly of this world.

The ancient Hebrews had been faring pretty okay under the rulership of the Judges: the occasional setback would occur, but no apocalyptic cataclysms to speak of—at least not since the flood.  The neighboring Oriental kings, however, appeared to have a more appealing and unified system going.  Problem was, the perfidious old Jews were craving the political structure and ignoring the religious underpinnings (“And they said to Samuel: make us a king, to judge us, as all nations have. And the Lord said to him: hearken to the voice of the people in all that they say to thee. For they have not rejected thee, but me, that I should not reign over them.”)

It’s possible—in the practical sphere—that the republican governments and constitutional monarchies of the modern West could fail (which they seem to be doing) to an extent that would not necessarily render the countries an apocalyptic wasteland.  Now Michael Voris is a world-class tool, but his recent controversy concerning democracy may’ve at least brought some well-deserved attention to the perversity that underlies “one man, one vote.”  If the internet is good for anything, it is for the ease of spreading memes which are at variance with the jingoistic diktats of the two ruling parties.  While a meme war victory does not appear imminent for monarchists of the Catholic stripe, and while present circumstances bode much more likely for an “apocalyptic cataclysm” than the restoration of rich kids to the throne of the Sun King, there is at least a provocative mustard seed of monarchist propaganda floating around.  As well as a cultural situation that could soon have Westerners looking to their own history for a new paradigm of governance—much in the same way the mumbling Jews of yore looked to the Cyruses of the East. 

Whether ancient or modern, though, the real challenge always lies in looking to the true East: Oriens nomen ejus.  ;D



Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Cambrensis - 10-07-2010

Resurrexi Wrote:I guess it must not be too hard for nobility to get an audience with the pope.

Not to mention a classy baptism:

On September 6, 2010 occured the baptism of Mgr the Prince Louis, Heir apparent of France, duke of Burgundy and of Mgr the Prince Alphonse of Bourbon, duke of Berry, his brother. Baptized in a chapel of the basilica St Peter at the Vatican during a ceremony officiated by the Cardinal Angelo Comastri (tenured archpriest of the Vatican Basilica and vicar general of the Pope for the City of the Vatican)

Louis and Alphonse ... were enscribed in the Baptismal Register of the Vatican as royal highnesses and dukes of Burgundy and of Berry in keeping with the French traditions.


http://lefleurdelystoo.blogspot.com/2010/09/royal-baptism.html

[Image: 58201_431050462946_14247182946_5278852_4869251_n.jpg]

ggreg Wrote:Definitely a good looking couple.  You can see the genetic effect of grabing all the best looking French women over many generations.  Even the kid is cute.

It has to be said they do look the part ...


[Image: l13787640131_7137.jpg]




Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Cambrensis - 10-07-2010

Excerpts from the message of Louis Alphonse on the 216th anniversary of Louis XVI's death:

The years pass and do not resemble each other. Some are more joyful than others. The world changes but certain fidelities remain, such as the one that reunites us for the 216th anniversary of the death of King Louis XVI.

In the epoch of crisis in which we live, when many of the false beliefs of yesterday are being reconsidered, what a beautiful sign that we still know how to recognize the basic values. In effect, beyond the deeply attractive personality of Louis XVI, our first duty is a duty of memory and fidelity to the values and principles embodied by French royalty ...

Louis XVI by his sacrifice, but also by his life, which he tried to consecrate totally to the welfare of his people, remains for us all an example. The reading of his testament to the spiritual and political life must always serve as a meditation for us.

Recall his last words, an invitation to benevolence and kindness. Beyond the sadness and the solitude that were the companions of his last days, he strenuously invited us, as his son to whom he addressed himself, to "forget all hatred and all resentment." We must meditate on these words imbued with human respect and tolerance. In the world in which we live, so harsh and often so full of pessimism, this message enlightens and strengthens us.

We should be exhorted to keep these landmarks that our ancestors have left us, landmarks that become so important at the moment when the world seems to lack them. Is it not our fortune to possess a 1,500-year-old tradition on which our country was built?

In the start of this year, Princess Marie Marguerite, our daughter the Princess Eugenie, and I myself assure you all of our wishes for our country, for your families and for all French people tested in great numbers by the unstable times we are going through.

May all the saints of France, may St. Louis, continue to protect France in order that She remain a great and powerful nation enlightened by the wisdom and patience of the Capetians.

Louis of Bourbon
Duke of Anjou
January 18, 2009



[Image: 59465_434673347946_14247182946_5348654_2725853_n.jpg]




Re: French royalists celebrate ... - AntoniusMaximus - 10-07-2010

(10-07-2010, 03:40 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(10-07-2010, 02:07 AM)CollegeCatholic Wrote: Is Monarchism anywhere near a slight possibility in ... well, anywhere?

Or are the Pretenders to the Thrones just kinda chillin', and like the use of the titles?

In the practical sphere, monarchies can probably only arise or be restored when countries are put in the same conditions those monarchies arose in... basically, the country in question needs to have undergone an apocalyptic cataclysm, and the pieces need to be put back together by warlords, among whom a king will rise.

Well, they can try doing it on a small scale.  Why doesn't he take his followers to some town in Anjou (as he is the Duke of it) and create jobs and schools and churches and be the patron of prosperity in that town, then county, then province, etc.  Have people declare their loyalties to him and slowly grow his kingdom, buying, performing good works and deeds especially in these dark times.  The downfall of monarchies was not the system of governance per se, but the abuses associated with it.  If he is truly a good Catholic, he will be guided by the social principles and avoid the errors and excesses that doomed the kingdoms.  Granted the Socialist will wet their pants and try to prevent it.  Well, alos he has it working against him not living in France, but rather in South America, quite a disconnect.




Re: French royalists celebrate ... - The_Harlequin_King - 10-07-2010

(10-07-2010, 04:29 PM)AntoniusMaximus Wrote: Well, they can try doing it on a small scale.  Why doesn't he take his followers to some town in Anjou (as he is the Duke of it) and create jobs and schools and churches and be the patron of prosperity in that town, then county, then province, etc.  Have people declare their loyalties to him and slowly grow his kingdom, buying, performing good works and deeds especially in these dark times.

That's what I would do. But titles of nobility have long been divorced from the actual regions they're associated with. Louis-Alphonse would mean nothing to the people of Anjou unless, perhaps, he had spent his entire life in good deeds to that region. Even then, he would have to find other means to achieve a truly celebrity status. I'd suggest becoming a film director, myself.

The thing is, I don't think Louis-Alphonse is interested so much in the actual kingship of France as he is in being the nominal head of the House of Bourbon.


Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Baskerville - 10-07-2010

(10-06-2010, 08:40 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [
I don't think he identifies himself with Frenchiness at all.

Ah so he isnt gay then.


Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Baskerville - 10-07-2010





Thats one hot wanna be Queen the he's married to.


Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Baskerville - 10-07-2010

(10-05-2010, 11:49 PM)SoCalLocal Wrote: But they're still just Frogs.


"Now Brian homosexuals are a very clean people. They have been ever since they came here from France"-Peter Griffin


Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Resurrexi - 10-07-2010

(10-07-2010, 02:46 PM)Cambrensis Wrote:
Resurrexi Wrote:I guess it must not be too hard for nobility to get an audience with the pope.

Not to mention a classy baptism:

It would have been classier had it been in the traditional rite. ;)


Re: French royalists celebrate ... - Cambrensis - 10-08-2010

Gilgamesh Wrote:In the religious sphere, however, the regal authority derives from God.  Authentic monarchy must come from the top down, not from the chaos up.  A warlord can rise to kingship, but any autocracy he may enjoy is strictly of this world.

But autocracy can be raised to the level of true authority.   :)

The powerful Ethelbert was at that time king of Kent; he had extended his dominions as far as the great river Humber, by which the Southern Saxons are divided from the Northern. On the east of Kent is the large Isle of Thanet containing according to the English way of reckoning, 600 families, divided from the other land by the river Wantsum, which is about three furlongs over, and fordable only in two places, for both ends of it run into the sea. In this island landed the servant of our Lord, Augustine, and his companions, being, as is reported, nearly forty men. They had, by order of the blessed Pope Gregory, taken interpreters of the nation of the Franks, and sending to Ethelbert, signified that they were come from Rome, and brought a joyful message, which most undoubtedly assured to all that took advantage of it everlasting joys in heaven and a kingdom that would never end with the living and true God. The king having heard this, ordered them to stay in that island where they had landed, and that they should be furnished with all necessaries, till he should consider what to do with them. For he had before heard of the Christian religion, having a Christian wife of the royal family of the Franks, called Bertha; whom he had received from her parents, upon condition that she should be permitted to practice her religion with the Bishop Luidhard, who was sent with her to preserve her faith. Some days after, the king came into the island, and sitting in the open air, ordered Augustine and his companions to be brought into his presence. For he had taken precaution that they should not come to him in any house, lest, according to an ancient superstition, if they practiced any magical arts, they might impose upon him, and so get the better of him. But they came furnished with Divine, not with magic virtue, bearing a silver cross for their banner, and the image of our Lord and Saviour painted on a board; and singing the litany, they offered up their prayers to the Lord for the eternal salvation both of themselves and of those to whom they were come. When he had sat down, pursuant to the king's commands, and preached to him and his attendants there present, the word of life, the king answered thus:  "Your words and promises are very fair, but as they are new to us, and of uncertain import, I cannot approve of them so far as to forsake that which I have so long followed with the whole English nation. But because you are come from far into my kingdom, and, as I conceive, are desirous to impart to us those things which you believe to be true, and most beneficial, we will not molest you, but give you favourable entertainment, and take care to supply you with your necessary sustenance; nor do we forbid you to preach and gain as many as you can to your religion." Accordingly he permitted them to reside in the city of Canterbury, which was the metropolis of all his dominions, and, pursuant to his promise, besides allowing them sustenance, did not refuse them liberty to preach.   - Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People