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Do trad kids rebel? - Printable Version

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Re: Do trad kids rebel? - love alabama - 11-05-2010

(11-01-2010, 10:15 AM)timoose Wrote: Yep, and now we can keep the little darlings on our insurance until 26. That's two post graduate degrees, with the attendant drinking and carousing. My, my aren't we loving ?
tim


You could thank Obama for that.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - Historian - 11-05-2010

@ruralpeace, you are very lucky to have thrift stores where you can find quality clothing. I mean that sincerely. I could never adequately outfit a family on the selections that are available at my local thrift/Goodwill stores. I think the employees take all the good stuff!  ;D

Furthermore, I don't know that I really have the desire, either (being honest). Visiting the store, sorting through the racks, etc., all takes time. I don't particularly like to shop (too many choices flusters me!), so I'd rather know that I can go into a particular store, get what I need, and leave. We've always focused on small wardrobes made of more expensive, quality materials in our family. My husband gets his leather shoes resoled, we replace linings in wool jackets, etc.

I do encourage young women to learn to sew. It's a skill that will serve them well for a lifetime. Once you find a classic pattern that you like and that is flattering, you can make it up in many different fabrics.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - love alabama - 11-05-2010

(11-02-2010, 11:54 AM)ruralpeace Wrote: "Your kids are going to grow up and discover that there is nothing inherently immoral about malls. They will then question everything you've taught them, and you will be in trouble."

Lolanthe:

Pretty strong statement. Do you really believe exposing them to the malls will help them spiritually? And not exposing them will eventually lead them to reject their parents? 

My kids recognize the malls for what they are. And for what they lack. 

They get the same message from our priests. From the pulpit. They question none of it.

They trust their parents. And their priests.

Both parents and priests are doing their best to spend quality time with these particular children (mine, of course!) Much of it outdoors. As it should be. The foundation of trust is being built upon solid, Catholic stones. A consistent message. Part of the solution.

Family-traditions must be rooted in traditional Catholic identity and culture. Rejection of consumerism, and the whole culture that's rooted in it, should be a cornerstone. It is, in our family. And from our priests. Of course, many reject this part of our priests message... This doesn't surprise me.

My kids compare nature to man's creation... and it's a no-brainer. Thankfully. They have no interest in the malls of suburbia. For they are not part of our family culture. And never will be.

It's not the mall, as a building, that is inherently immoral...

It's the contents...  These days, at least, for the malls are not the same as they were when many of us were kids. Obviously.

What surprises me is the defence of malls. In their present state. As if they are part of our Catholic culture. Which they are not.

To each his/her own. .

+JMJ+


Do you think Rural homesteading would be a good idea?


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - Underdog - 11-05-2010

Yesterday we spent the day in....a den of iniquity (aka "the mall").  It was a lot of fun.  We went north to a "family" mall...one of those suburban malls that caters to families with younger children.  First, before the 2yo got too restless, we hit Williams-Sonoma (smelled like apple pie) and then Pottery Barn (they've got some really soft throw pillows).  Next, we hit the LEGO store...very cool.  The kiddos got to fill out a "Wish List" form...LEGO will hold a drawing in Dec and whoever wins gets all ten LEGO sets on their wish list.  After that, we headed on to Children's Place...where I bought both of our daughters new slippers (so cute...look like cupcakes).  A quick potty run to the "family" restroom (individual bathrooms for families...that each have a teeny tiny potty for littles and lowered sinks) provided the inspiration for our 2yo to use the potty herself (which she did--yay!).  Next up was the food court...nothing immodest or a near occasion of sin...just a collection of restaurants like Chick-Fil-A, Sonic, & Sbarro's.  Once we finished up there we took a turn on the............CAROUSEL!!!  Our 2yo had a blast!  Then we headed to Pottery Barn Kids...a great place for kids to play while parents look over the furniture and goods.  We are in the market for new bedroom furniture...so this was perfect...and I look forward to the investment we will make soon.  After that, we shopped The Gap--the horror!--for scipio, who needed several new shirts for winter.  I cruised over to Baby Gap...I love the baby clothes there...but alas! I had no need of new baby stuffs...but I did enjoy looking at the posters...such cute pics of babies!  We strolled through the mall, sampled apple pie coffee and mint Moose Munch at Harry & David's, peeked into the couple of cars on display downstairs (one just happened to be a modern-day station wagon by Infiniti), and capped off our trip with frozen yogurt for the kiddos.  All that...and no near occasion of sin, no consumerism, no gluttony, no greed, no covetousness, no scandal (even, strangely enough, from A&F)...just an easy-going, enjoyable day.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - Vetus Ordo - 11-05-2010

LEGO was one of the best things ever invented.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - 3Sanctus - 11-05-2010

(11-05-2010, 12:44 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote: LEGO was one of the best things ever invented.

Ahem...ONE OF?  ;D

I loved playing with LEGO's as a kid, and can't wait to play with those and Lincoln Logs with my children, should I have any.  :)


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - JayneK - 11-05-2010

(11-05-2010, 12:42 PM)Underdog Wrote:  All that...and no near occasion of sin, no consumerism, no gluttony, no greed, no covetousness, no scandal (even, strangely enough, from A&F)...just an easy-going, enjoyable day.

That very well may be true.  But if you had become desensitized to the sins of the mall you would not be able to recognize them for what they were.  By its very nature, it is extremely difficult for people to see desensitization in themselves.  One of the functions of Lenten penances is to remove our usual pleasures from our lives to make us more sensitive to their spiritual influence.  Taking a break from something increases our awareness of any sinfulness we may be taking for granted when immersed in it.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - Underdog - 11-05-2010

LEGOs...a very cool toy...that spreads quickly across carpet...and lay in wait for the unsuspecting bare foot...especially those light gray pieces...I think it's a conspiracy!



As for rebellion, I think it is pretty rare...in all kids.  What many parents consider rebelling is merely a clash of personalities.  For example, I was a picky eater as a young child; scipio was not.  Along comes child #1: a picky eater.  I remember all those fights with my dad...and how I suddenly came around at about age 12 (puberty--when all kids get hungry).  Scipio, however, is really bothered by this child's pickiness...and occasionally it turns into a battle of wills.  Now, this child does not mean to grate on the nerves of his poor father...and I cannot help but believe that he is not rebelling...he is simply hardwired to dislike the taste/texture of certain foods.  I figure once puberty hits he'll come around...till then, fighting is futile and a source of unnecessary stress in our home.

A lot of what we consider "the right way" is nothing more than personal preference (like skirts...LOL).  I grew up having my hair parted down the middle (pig tails were oh so popular in the 70s).  My daughters both have parts on the side...my preference...imposed as soon as there was enough hair to part.  Personally, I think hair parted on the side looks best on most women...some can pull off a center part, but in my opinion the side part is prettiest.  My oldest daughter has taken on the responsibility of grooming her own hair...and occasionally she fails to part it...or parts it close to center.  Sometimes I "correct" her hair by re-parting it (only works if it is still wet...found that out the hard way).  However, should my daughter(s) at some point decide a center part is more to her liking...I shall concede to her the decision to do so.  I cannot believe that my desire should be the basis for the rule...on a silly little issue...such as where my daughter parts her hair.  If she center parts it...that's not rebelling.  And if I fought her...and she became entrenched in her practice of parting her hair down the center of her head...I think I could reasonably expect all my granddaughters to have center parted hair.  Plus, if she resented my constant interference and petty arguing...and became angry...I would incur Divine condemnation.  That's right...provoke them to rebel...guess who merits the punishment for that one--the parent!  So, I may like her hair to be side parted for formal portraits or recitals or Mass...but I'm unwilling to make it such an issue that I sow discord between us on such a petty issue...or between her and her brothers & sisters.  My personal preferences are not that important.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - Underdog - 11-05-2010

(11-05-2010, 01:07 PM)JayneK Wrote:
(11-05-2010, 12:42 PM)Underdog Wrote:  All that...and no near occasion of sin, no consumerism, no gluttony, no greed, no covetousness, no scandal (even, strangely enough, from A&F)...just an easy-going, enjoyable day.

That very well may be true.  But if you had become desensitized to the sins of the mall you would not be able to recognize them for what they were.  By its very nature, it is extremely difficult for people to see desensitization in themselves.  One of the functions of Lenten penances is to remove our usual pleasures from our lives to make us more sensitive to their spiritual influence.  Taking a break from something increases our awareness of any sinfulness we may be taking for granted when immersed in it.

Well, seeing as I can't even remember the last time I visited a mall...desensitization is not probable.


Re: Do trad kids rebel? - 3Sanctus - 11-05-2010

(11-05-2010, 01:28 PM)Underdog Wrote: LEGOs...a very cool toy...that spreads quickly across carpet...and lay in wait for the unsuspecting bare foot...especially those light gray pieces...I think it's a conspiracy!

It's all a conspiracy!

REMEMBER!:  Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you!

While I'm not a parent (or married) yet (I'm thinking I'll end up going down that road), it seems what you said is very much the case.  I remember being constantly accused of being bad and disobedient when I was young, when I felt like I was bending over backward to get along with my father (we've never got along very well).  I want to be particularly careful of pushing when I have children - though there are some things that won't be up for discussion (things like make-up and skirts are things I feel are a bit of a big deal to me at this point - we'll see how that goes, but I don't intend to watch any little girls I may have dressing up like hussies) I hope Saint Joseph will intercede on my behalf that I may be an understanding father who is firm (and as firm and necessary) when necessary, but otherwise loving and appropriately mild.