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Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - Printable Version

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Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - mistman - 09-06-2011

I hear this term all the time from pro-Latin Catholics about the new mass being the "novus ordo."

I was reading this hotly anti-clerical history of the middle ages by Jacques Le Goff called Medieval Civilization, 400-1500. On page 260, I found this: "The term ordo, which is Carolingian rather than specifically feudal, belongs to religious terminology and thus relates generally to a religious vision of society, to clerics and layman, to the spiritual and the temporal."

Ok, so I kept thinking about that ominous phrase on our dollar bill: "novus ordo seclurom." Does this mean then "new religion of the ages?"  :o

I saw this video on youtube about the Theosophical Society and I paused it in order to write down what it claimed were it's three main religious tenets:

1. Universal brotherhood of humanity without distinction of race, colour or creed
2. Promote the study of the world's religions
3. Investigate the hidden mysteries of nature

The question about youtube that I always have is does it match what I see? I'm naturally skeptical of it but I do catch occasional gems there. Since about 1994 I've conducted some research on this stuff based on reading and my own observation. I do see this "creed" in action to a point. Madame Blavatsky from what I understand is a very dubious character, along with her followers. I guess the disturbing thing is how some of her followers would embrace this society and still go looking for "christ" and even claim to be "christian." I see this too, again, to a point.

There seems to be a strange vibe in the world today, do you think this new ordo is a religion being promoted everywhere?





Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - Mithrandylan - 09-06-2011

novus ordo seculorum means "new world order"

right?


Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - Vetus Ordo - 09-06-2011

Ordo is just the Latin word for "order."

It's simple and straightforward.




Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - The_Harlequin_King - 09-06-2011

(09-06-2011, 07:40 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote: novus ordo seculorum means "new world order"

right?

Not exactly. It means "new order of the ages". You know the phrase "saecula saeculorum" (unto the ages of ages) from the liturgy. Anyway, "novus ordo saeclorum" comes indirectly from Vergil's Fourth Eclogue, and it seems Vergil dropped the U in order to make it fit in verse.

Interesting, medieval Christians read the poem, and the great order of the ages, as a reference to the age of Christ.


Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - Heinrich - 09-06-2011

A most lapidary and edifying answer, your majesty.


Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - GottmitunsAlex - 09-06-2011

So, is "ordo" order or ordinary?
Does the meaning depend on the words before/after it?




Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - Vetus Ordo - 09-06-2011

(09-06-2011, 08:46 PM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote: So, is "ordo" order or ordinary?

It's a noun, not an adjective. It means "order."

Ordo, ordinis (noun, masculine, 3rd declension)

1. a row, line, series, order, rank
2. a line, rank, array
3. band, troop, company, century
4. a captaincy, command
5. an order, rank, class, degree
6. a class, rank, station, condition


Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - GottmitunsAlex - 09-06-2011

(09-06-2011, 08:57 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(09-06-2011, 08:46 PM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote: So, is "ordo" order or ordinary?

It's a noun, not an adjective. It means "order."

Ordo, ordinis (noun, masculine, 3rd declension)

1. a row, line, series, order, rank
2. a line, rank, array
3. band, troop, company, century
4. a captaincy, command
5. an order, rank, class, degree
6. a class, rank, station, condition
So Novus ordo missae means new order mass and not new ordinary mass
Thanks.




Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - Vetus Ordo - 09-06-2011

(09-06-2011, 09:17 PM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote: So Novus ordo missae means new order mass

New order of mass.

Missae is in the genitive case.


Re: Has anybody else run across this definition of "ordo?" - GottmitunsAlex - 09-06-2011

(09-06-2011, 09:32 PM)Vetus Ordo Wrote:
(09-06-2011, 09:17 PM)GottmitunsAlex Wrote: So Novus ordo missae means new order mass

New order of mass.

Missae is in the genitive case.
Got it.
Thanks again