FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums
Overwhelmed by Hindu thought - Printable Version

+- FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums)
+-- Forum: Church (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?fid=2)
+--- Forum: Catholicism (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?fid=10)
+--- Thread: Overwhelmed by Hindu thought (/showthread.php?tid=52496)

Pages: 1 2 3 4


Re: Overwhelmed by Hindu thought - kingtheoden - 01-25-2012

If there were ever any wonder for confusion today, a trip over to the Catholic Encyclopedia at New Advent online would clarify things.  The article on Hinduism is not preceded with an IRS like warning:

Quote:To complement this article, which was taken from the 1910 Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent recommends a prayerful reading of "Nostra Aetate" from the Second Vatican Council.

I appreciate New Advent for hosting the entire encyclopedia, but this blatant modernistic pandering is really irritating.  In any event, here is the article link: http://newadvent.org/cathen/07358b.htm


Re: Overwhelmed by Hindu thought - The Dying Flutchman - 01-25-2012

(01-25-2012, 07:21 PM)kingtheoden Wrote: If there were ever any wonder for confusion today, a trip over to the Catholic Encyclopedia at New Advent online would clarify things.  The article on Hinduism is not preceded with an IRS like warning:

Quote:To complement this article, which was taken from the 1910 Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent recommends a prayerful reading of "Nostra Aetate" from the Second Vatican Council.

I appreciate New Advent for hosting the entire encyclopedia, but this blatant modernistic pandering is really irritating.  In any event, here is the article link: http://newadvent.org/cathen/07358b.htm

Wow thats sad. "Here's what the Church used to believe but we changed all that" :eyeroll:


Re: Overwhelmed by Hindu thought - formerbuddhist - 01-25-2012

"The more we really appreciate the noble revulsion and renunciation of Buddha, the more we see that intellectually it was the converse and almost the contrary of the salvation of the world by Christ. The Christian would escape from the world into the universe: the Buddhist wishes to escape from the universe even more then from the world. One would uncreate himself; the other would return to his Creation: to his Creator. Indeed it was so genuinely the converse the idea of the Cross as the Tree of Life, that there is some excuse for setting up the two things side by side, as if they were of equal significance. They are in one sense parallel and equal; as a mound and a hollow, as a valley and a hill. There is a sense in which that sublime despair is the only alternative to that divine audacity. It is even true that the truly spiritual and intellectual man sees it as a sort of dilemma; a very hard and terrible choice. There is little else on earth that can compare with these for completeness. And he who will not climb the mountain of Christ does indeed fall into the abyss of Buddha."
G.K. Chesterton, quoted in his


Re: Overwhelmed by Hindu thought - SimplyCatholic - 01-25-2012

Thank you for this quote.  I'll try to look up this book when I get a chance.  I think you hit the nail on the head regarding why so many are falling away to Eastern religions these days--the retreat of the Church from her God-given mission has left a void, and people are just looking for something to fill it with.  If only it was the Truth!  And how heart-breaking that it's right there, so close, but those who should be shepherding people to it are turning them away.

What did Our Lord say about the Pharisees?  "You shut up the kingdom of heaven against men.  For you yourselves do not enter in, and those who were entering, you hinder."


Re: Overwhelmed by Hindu thought - Scriptorium - 01-25-2012

(01-25-2012, 08:14 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: After having practiced Buddhism and brought to the depths of the deepest nihilistic despair while doing so I think he really gets it, at least he "gets" my own experience with it. I faced the abyss and saw that I wasn't willing to live and die for an impersonal absolute and a goal of fading into zero but met Christ, the personal God. More then anything else it was seeing by a sort of signal grace that God is real, He is personal and that He cares for each of us individually with a deeply personal love. He really desires our salvation, not just collectively but individually. Buddhism is a "pull yourselves up by the bootstraps" sort of religion where you face an empty suffering world and realize nothing in it, including your own view of self, is worth anything but eventually dropping and getting away from and the only peace to be found is in the silence of being nothing, knowing nothing, feeling nothing, clinging to nothing. Your own trip to the abyss is paid for by your own personal struggle with no God above to help you. That was another part of it that I eventually just found downright repulsive. Once I had really encountered Christ I just couldn't be a Buddhist anymore. It seemed dead, depressing and lifeless on so many levels.

I think you allude well here to some of the deficiencies of Buddhism as religion. Buddhist history is a story of a teacher's subtle teachings being pushed every which way except up to heaven. In general the winners were the nihilists -- no self, emptiness, a world only of mental creations, etc. The sublime vision of Christianity avoids the extremes of only faith, and only works; and only us, and only God. Aquinas is a master at showing existence is human and divine, and we come to God by faith and works. I only defend the Buddha in his own context. To a dark society, he was a light. But that light I believe was a preparation of the Indian people, not a final statement. His orthodox teachings are very apt for that setting, and they do address many fundamental spiritual issues in the holy life. I am reading right now Self-Abandonment to Divine Providence, by Fr Jean-Pierre de Caussade. It addresses the basic question, what happens to me as I ascend to God? The truth is, "you" gets in the way. Holiness comes with confromity to the will of God. "You" doesn't die, but you are transformed into the Divine. When love is this close, you and I melts away. Like the Church says, you are now one flesh. Should the divine life not make one also? So if the Buddha is "translated", much of what he says is found in the Church Fathers and the Doctors and Mystics of the Church. But Christ is the key which turns a very "empty" vision into a beautiful bliss, and gives it meaning. Buddhism today has no true function in itself and as taught leads many souls away from God.