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Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - Poche - 03-05-2015

I think a good idea would be to meditate on the mystries of Christ and how they relate to what you are doing at the moment.


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - Pro Tridentina (Malta) - 03-05-2015

(03-04-2015, 07:40 PM)Sequentia Wrote: As far as I remember, the instructor had no interest or even taught anything with regards to Daoism. I actually took tai chi because I injured myself in judo, which I never took again.

Isn't judo related to a mixture of Shintoism, Confucianism and Buddhism? Just asking because it's the martial art that I prefer...


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - Clare Brigid - 03-05-2015

There is much of great value in Eastern philosophy and traditions that can be reconciled and integrated with one's traditional Christian understanding and practice.  This can be enriching and enlivening for many people.  As long as one is sober -- without being either uncritical or paranoid -- I think it can be strengthening for certain people.

I highly recommend the book, Christ the Eternal Tao, by Hieromonk Damascene Christensen.  It is utterly profound.  It is also a superb explanation of the tradition of prayer of the heart and theosis in the Eastern Church, which comprises the second part of the book.  The first part is an exquisitely beautiful re-presentation of the Gospel in the style of the Tao te Ching.  Significantly, Chinese bibles translate logos as tao, "the Way."

[Image: 51MysLCx5CL.jpg]


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - New Arcadian - 03-05-2015

(03-04-2015, 11:01 PM)olgamarie.tanon Wrote: I would not have expected these answers, I thought this was a traditional catholic place.I was taught nothing with eastern influence.

This is a Traditional Catholicism board but people around here don't seem to be beholden to a panic stricken reactionary-ism. Just because you are a black belt at a strip mall tae kwon do dojang doesn't mean that you are dabbling in Buddhism. American martial arts are largely isolated from eastern spiritual practices. Yoga/ Qui Gong/ Tai Chi is a far more dangerous path that is flocked to by the "spiritual, not religious" crowd who try to infuse it with their brand of mysticism.

I agree that eastern mysticism should be avoided, but I am also against using a broad brush with little discernment.

Afterall, some of my favorite places to eat have a painted gold buddha sitting next to a smiling asahi cat


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - spikepaga - 03-05-2015

how many pagan Roman practices  has the Church adapted and made its own, and used in turn to give glory to God?

-language
-architecture
-even titles (Pontifex, etc)

If your intention is to simply use it as a means to workout its not even worth thinking about. Do it. 


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - J Michael - 03-05-2015

My first Tai Chi teacher is an extremely devout convert to Catholicism.  Never once was there any hint of any kind of pagan worship/influence/devotion, etc. in his instruction.

Here's an interesting article by him.

I've used Tai Chi to help heal an arthritic knee, to relax, and just to help keep my mind and body working a little better.  I have some enormous issues and struggles with my Christian faith, but I seriously doubt they are a result of my practice of Tai Chi, although if one wanted to one could erroneously correlate the two. 

Speaking of "danger", RF, anything of "the world" is potentially dangerous for us, whether it be a martial art form, learning calligraphy or pyrography, Zentangling, painting water colors, or eating at your favorite Chinese restaurant or Western "gourmet" burger joint.




Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - Ave Castitatis Lilium - 03-05-2015

(03-04-2015, 11:01 PM)olgamarie.tanon Wrote: I would not have expected these answers, I thought this was a traditional catholic place.I was taught nothing with eastern influence.

There's no such thing as "eastern." It's a fundamentalist buzzword to discourage study of things that are generally no more harmful than Plato and Aristotle. There are, however, hundreds of traditions in China, Japan, Korea, India, and their neighbors, many of which are very valuable.

(03-05-2015, 10:06 AM)spikepaga Wrote: how many pagan Roman practices  has the Church adapted and made its own, and used in turn to give glory to God?

-language
-architecture
-even titles (Pontifex, etc)

If your intention is to simply use it as a means to workout its not even worth thinking about. Do it. 

Don't forget Holy Water and clasping hands together to pray, straight out of German paganism.

(03-05-2015, 06:36 AM)Clare Brigid Wrote: There is much of great value in Eastern philosophy and traditions that can be reconciled and integrated with one's traditional Christian understanding and practice.  This can be enriching and enlivening for many people.  As long as one is sober -- without being either uncritical or paranoid -- I think it can be strengthening for certain people.

I highly recommend the book, Christ the Eternal Tao, by Hieromonk Damascene Christensen.  It is utterly profound.  It is also a superb explanation of the tradition of prayer of the heart and theosis in the Eastern Church, which comprises the second part of the book.  The first part is an exquisitely beautiful re-presentation of the Gospel in the style of the Tao te Ching.  Significantly, Chinese bibles translate logos as tao, "the Way."

[Image: 51MysLCx5CL.jpg]

This.


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - Renatus Frater - 03-05-2015

(03-05-2015, 01:21 PM)J Michael Wrote: My first Tai Chi teacher is an extremely devout convert to Catholicism.  Never once was there any hint of any kind of pagan worship/influence/devotion, etc. in his instruction.

Here's an interesting article by him.

I've used Tai Chi to help heal an arthritic knee, to relax, and just to help keep my mind and body working a little better.  I have some enormous issues and struggles with my Christian faith, but I seriously doubt they are a result of my practice of Tai Chi, although if one wanted to one could erroneously correlate the two. 

Speaking of "danger", RF, anything of "the world" is potentially dangerous for us, whether it be a martial art form, learning calligraphy or pyrography, Zentangling, painting water colors, or eating at your favorite Chinese restaurant or Western "gourmet" burger joint.

LOL that was clearly not my point. I'm pretty sure Sequentia, like me, is not against inculturation proper, but picking stuff from foreign religions and putting a Christian stamp, as it were, is not inculturation proper. This is the error of many a new Mass.
And besides, my point is not that there is a danger in superficial accidents of some culture, like the food and whatnot. But physical exercises, as I said, forms one as a person, as we are not angels. So there is a compound danger: as Cyriacus said we hardly have access to people familiar with the culture and its implications (so, forget about the analogy with the Romans), and by doing this we are practicing a thing that forms us deeply, and not one thing we do on weekends, like going to the local Chinese restaurant.

But you guys seem to think absolutely everything short of actual murder is OK. This is either liberalism or plain laziness to think seriously about things. And I'm tired of talking to liberal and/or lazy Catholics.


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - Clare Brigid - 03-05-2015

My sincere advice to fellow Fisheaters:  please do not merely react to Renatus Frater's post.

Renatus Frater, we wish you well and we thank you for being with us and for contributing so thoughtfully to discussions here. I hope you will be patient with whatever you might consider our shortcomings, remain genuinely open without violating your own conscience, and remain with us, or, at least, visit us often.

Pax.


Re: Catholicism and eastern martial arts - J Michael - 03-05-2015

(03-05-2015, 02:28 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(03-05-2015, 01:21 PM)J Michael Wrote: My first Tai Chi teacher is an extremely devout convert to Catholicism.  Never once was there any hint of any kind of pagan worship/influence/devotion, etc. in his instruction.

Here's an interesting article by him.

I've used Tai Chi to help heal an arthritic knee, to relax, and just to help keep my mind and body working a little better.  I have some enormous issues and struggles with my Christian faith, but I seriously doubt they are a result of my practice of Tai Chi, although if one wanted to one could erroneously correlate the two. 

Speaking of "danger", RF, anything of "the world" is potentially dangerous for us, whether it be a martial art form, learning calligraphy or pyrography, Zentangling, painting water colors, or eating at your favorite Chinese restaurant or Western "gourmet" burger joint.

LOL that was clearly not my point. I'm pretty sure Sequentia, like me, is not against inculturation proper, but picking stuff from foreign religions and putting a Christian stamp, as it were, is not inculturation proper. This is the error of many a new Mass.
And besides, my point is not that there is a danger in superficial accidents of some culture, like the food and whatnot. But physical exercises, as I said, forms one as a person, as we are not angels. So there is a compound danger: as Cyriacus said we hardly have access to people familiar with the culture and its implications (so, forget about the analogy with the Romans), and by doing this we are practicing a thing that forms us deeply, and not one thing we do on weekends, like going to the local Chinese restaurant.

But you guys seem to think absolutely everything short of actual murder is OK. This is either liberalism or plain laziness to think seriously about things. And I'm tired of talking to liberal and/or lazy Catholics.

And yet one can certainly benefit physically (as well as mentally and emotionally) from the practice of a "foreign" art form without the enculturation you speak of.  Many people do this quite profitably without consciously or unconsciously trying to adapt it to Christianity or Christianity to it.  I know, it kinda sounds like compartmentalizing things when everything we do affects to one degree or another everything else we do.  But if one has even a basic Christian faith which is regularly practiced, it's my humble [i]opinion[/i], that the dangers you think might be there will be minimized if not completely obviated.  And, obviously, I certainly could be wrong, too. :Hmm:

And your last statement was painting so many people here with so broad a brush that it is only laughable.  C'mon, RF, are we really all *that* bad??  Maybe if you could clearly and simply (I need things kept simple, you know... :LOL:) show us how practicing Tai Chi or whatever is sinful or one of those Roman Catholic "occasions [near or otherwise] of sin" it would help me, if not others, understand where you're coming from.