FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums
Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Printable Version

+- FishEaters Traditional Catholic Forums (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums)
+-- Forum: Piazza (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?fid=3)
+--- Forum: Domestic Arts, Crafts, Child-rearing (https://www.fisheaters.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?fid=25)
+--- Thread: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. (/showthread.php?tid=85933)



Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Teresa Agrorum - 01-08-2020

No, it's not a joke. We are obsessed with food, but many of us now do not know how to cook, and this is driving us out of the home and away from the family, Joseph Shaw writes.

https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/to-restore-a-healthy-christ-centered-culture-learn-to-cook

If this is something you struggle with, here's an easy recipe for chicken broth or stock that will add flavor and nutrition to busy-night meals.

Chicken Broth or Stock

For broth: buy 3 to 4 lbs. chicken parts (on sale--never pay full price; I use leg and thigh quarters). Rinse chicken and place in a Dutch oven with a lid. Add cold water almost to the top; sprinkle with 2 teaspoons salt and throw in a heaping 1/4 teaspoon of whole peppercorns. Then add 1 to 2 tablespoons white vinegar. Bring to a simmer then turn the heat down to low. Cover and walk away.

For the first few hours lift the lid occasionally; if your burner is set properly the pot will bubble ever so gently and the water level will not appear to reduce. Leave the broth alone for 24 hours. When time is up, strain and reserve the liquid; give the refuse to the barn cats. (Go ahead and taste, if you like--the meat will be utterly flavorless.) At this point you may fill mason jars with your broth (keep the fat, it will help with preservation), cool down quickly in a cold water bath, and refrigerate or freeze. I like to boil mine down further to make a strong essence--saves storage space in the freezer, and I need only a few tablespoons for a recipe.

For stock, add carrots (trim and peel if store-bought), onions in their skins (discard root end), celery leaves, etc., with seasonings at the beginning of the cooking. You really can't go wrong.

When a recipe says 'add water', add broth or stock instead. You'll soon wonder how you got along without it.


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - jovan66102 - 01-08-2020

I can make an excellent meat stock. Unfortunately the Cuter&Shorter Half is a vegetarian. Ergo, I have to use vegetable stock. And vegetable stock with no salt (my diet) is pretty insipid stuff!


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - MaryTN - 01-08-2020

Home cooking saves A LOT of money.
.
One meal out for the family can cost the same as a weeks worth of groceries.
.
And the food tastes much better.  I love my crock pot.


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Jeeter - 01-09-2020

Teresa Agrorum Wrote:When a recipe says 'add water', add broth or stock instead. You'll soon wonder how you got along without it.

This.

I save broth from steaming or boiling vegetables, place it in mason jars with a dash of salt, then freeze it.

For chicken stock I'll make a batch of soup, then when it's almost gone, add more water and boil for a couple more hours.


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Teresa Agrorum - 01-09-2020

save broth from steaming or boiling vegetables, place it in mason jars with a dash of salt, then freeze it.

Great idea, never thought of that and will add it to the stock. (Now I don't have to have actual vegetables on hand.  :D )


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Jeeter - 01-10-2020

Teresa Agrorum Wrote:save broth from steaming or boiling vegetables, place it in mason jars with a dash of salt, then freeze it.

Great idea, never thought of that and will add it to the stock. (Now I don't have to have actual vegetables on hand.  :D )


Thanks!

We steam & boil veggies a lot here, since it's quick and easy, so I've started reserving the leftover liquids.  Typically my mason jar veggie broth is a mixture of potato, carrot, green bean, and broccoli water.  Meatless for Fridays, and much better than using water. :)


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Momarchist - 01-17-2020

I've read a lot about how the disappearance of traditional staples like eating organ meats, cartilage, broths has caused a cascade of health issues. Also the disappearance of fermented beverages and foods from the diet. One of my goals as a homemaker is to do my own ferments. I don't have the supplies or space right now. Does anyone have experience with culturing at home?


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Teresa Agrorum - 01-22-2020

Hi, Momarchist. I make sourdough and kombucha (at least once a week), cultured buttermilk, pickles, sauerkraut, etc. It's surprisingly easy, and as a Type II diabetic, this is the stuff that keeps me out of trouble (along with vitamins and lots of minerals). It's also incredibly delicious. I can help you with advice, if you like.


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Momarchist - 01-27-2020

Yes, I would love that, Teresa, thank you. "Easy", I like that word! What I struggle with is the schedule for all of this, and what equipment I need. I looked at Cultures for Health but their fermenting jars are expensive. I'm not sure how I can get started inexpensively without adding a lot to my plate in terms of time commitment. How often do you make each thing? Do you do it on a schedule or just when you need it?


RE: Want to save the world? Learn to cook. - Teresa Agrorum - 01-29-2020

How often I make a particular food does depend on how much we will eat on a weekly basis as well as the quantity that can be made within a reasonable amount of time, of course. For example, if you manage to make enough sauerkraut over the course of a couple of weeks, this supply might last you all year--or all of a month, if you eat it daily. If you've made too much, give it away. (For some unfathomable reason, priests seem to love sauerkraut.)

The marvelous thing is how simple fermenting actually is. You don't need expensive equipment--ordinary mason jars with lids work perfectly, and you can use the 'brine bag' method to release gases and keep air and pathogens out. The recipe for fermenting any vegetable is straightforward: rinse and cut, prepare a brine of salt and distilled water, fill clean mason jars with the mixture, top with the brine bag, and close the jar somewhat loosely. How much salt to use, ideal pickling temperature, and how long to let it go can be determined from this table (page down):

https://www.pickl-it.com/blog/636/brine-recommendations/

Note that this Web site sells fermentation equipment--they're selling and want you to buy. But you really don't need these things to successfully pickle anything. I'm an average person who does not own a dishwasher (unless you count my husband) and I've rarely had a ferment go bad. (You can always tell by the smell; if the food doesn't smell appetizing, throw it out and start over. Usually, you didn't add enough salt.)

The brine bag that takes the place of an airlock is easily made: partly fill a clean Ziploc sandwich baggie with fresh brine, lay it inside your filled mason jar, and check to ensure it covers the food completely and seals the edge of the jar. As the vegetable ferments, gases will be released; these will bubble up around the brine bag and escape (no exploding jars) but air and pathogens cannot enter.

People always ask about salt content--is this much salt good for you? Fermentation does require a sufficient amount of salt to prevent the growth of bad guys, but here's the wonderful thing: good bacteria, the ones that boost the immune system, actually eat salt. As the sodium level falls, the amount of good bacteria present increases. The optimum level is reached at around six months to one year (active fermentation for about 2 weeks, usually, then an aging period in the refrigerator).

A beautiful thing, isn't it? Other fermented foods (yogurt, sourdough including the 'old dough' method, cheese, pickling meats, etc.) employ other methods, but you're always in awe of how it works. What are you interested in? Start with something small that appeals and see how it goes.

How anyone can make these foods and not believe in God beats me.  :D