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Divine Mercy Chaplet - Printable Version

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Divine Mercy Chaplet - Pandora - 11-14-2020

Does anyone know of a "traditional" Divine Mercy chaplet recording or YouTube video?  I know a lot of trads don't like the Divine Mercy for a host of reasons, but I think it's a good and powerful prayer.

It's probably just me, but I now find hearing "Holy Spirit" instead of "Holy Ghost" really jarring.  I also feel that because it is such a profound prayer, we should use elevated language (Thee, Thy, Thine...).

Has anyone come across a version like this?


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - jovan66102 - 11-14-2020

No idea, since I prefer traditional prayers that haven't had major questions regarding the Index swirling around them.

However, I do say the Chaplet of the Holy Wounds from which it is pretty obvious the 'Divine Mercy Chaplet' was copied.

It was revealed to Sr Marie Marthe Chambon, a  Visitandine, in the 1860s, and was approved for the Institute of Visitation in 1912, and was authorized by Decree of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on March 23, 1999.

  • The following prayer is said on the crucifix: "O Jesus, Divine Redeemer, be merciful to us and to the whole world. Amen."
  • followed by the first three beads:

  • "Holy God, Mighty God, Immortal God, have mercy on us and on the whole world. Amen" (This prayer is found in the Chaplet of the Divine Mercy.)

  • "Grace and Mercy, O my Jesus, during present dangers; cover us with Your Precious Blood. Amen."

  • "Eternal Father, grant us mercy through the Blood of Jesus Christ, Your only Son; grant us mercy we beseech You. Amen, Amen, Amen."
  • The following prayer is said on the large beads of the rosary chain: "Eternal Father, I offer You the Wounds of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, to heal the wounds of our souls."
  • The following prayer is said on the small beads of the rosary chain: "My Jesus, pardon and mercy, through the merits of Your Holy Wounds"



RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - Augustinian - 11-15-2020

(11-14-2020, 09:54 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: No idea, since I prefer traditional prayers that haven't had major questions regarding the Index swirling around them.

However, I do say the Chaplet of the Holy Wounds from which it is pretty obvious the 'Divine Mercy Chaplet' was copied.

It was revealed to Sr Marie Marthe Chambon, a  Visitandine, in the 1860s, and was approved for the Institute of Visitation in 1912, and was authorized by Decree of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on March 23, 1999.

  • The following prayer is said on the crucifix: "O Jesus, Divine Redeemer, be merciful to us and to the whole world. Amen."
  • followed by the first three beads:

  • "Holy God, Mighty God, Immortal God, have mercy on us and on the whole world. Amen" (This prayer is found in the Chaplet of the Divine Mercy.)

  • "Grace and Mercy, O my Jesus, during present dangers; cover us with Your Precious Blood. Amen."

  • "Eternal Father, grant us mercy through the Blood of Jesus Christ, Your only Son; grant us mercy we beseech You. Amen, Amen, Amen."
  • The following prayer is said on the large beads of the rosary chain: "Eternal Father, I offer You the Wounds of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, to heal the wounds of our souls."
  • The following prayer is said on the small beads of the rosary chain: "My Jesus, pardon and mercy, through the merits of Your Holy Wounds"

This is much preferred to the spurious (potentially demonic) Divine Mercy devotion.

I highly recommend doing a Sacred Heart of Jesus chaplet, rather than the DM. I have my own that I came up with based off of the other versions of the Sacred Heart chaplet, but here you can find one with indulgenced prayers: https://www.virgosacrata.com/indulgenced-chaplet-sacred-heart.html


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - Pandora - 11-15-2020

(11-15-2020, 10:08 AM)Augustinian Wrote:
(11-14-2020, 09:54 PM)jovan66102 Wrote: No idea, since I prefer traditional prayers that haven't had major questions regarding the Index swirling around them.

However, I do say the Chaplet of the Holy Wounds from which it is pretty obvious the 'Divine Mercy Chaplet' was copied.

It was revealed to Sr Marie Marthe Chambon, a  Visitandine, in the 1860s, and was approved for the Institute of Visitation in 1912, and was authorized by Decree of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on March 23, 1999.

  • The following prayer is said on the crucifix: "O Jesus, Divine Redeemer, be merciful to us and to the whole world. Amen."
  • followed by the first three beads:

  • "Holy God, Mighty God, Immortal God, have mercy on us and on the whole world. Amen" (This prayer is found in the Chaplet of the Divine Mercy.)

  • "Grace and Mercy, O my Jesus, during present dangers; cover us with Your Precious Blood. Amen."

  • "Eternal Father, grant us mercy through the Blood of Jesus Christ, Your only Son; grant us mercy we beseech You. Amen, Amen, Amen."
  • The following prayer is said on the large beads of the rosary chain: "Eternal Father, I offer You the Wounds of Our Lord, Jesus Christ, to heal the wounds of our souls."
  • The following prayer is said on the small beads of the rosary chain: "My Jesus, pardon and mercy, through the merits of Your Holy Wounds"

This is much preferred to the spurious (potentially demonic) Divine Mercy devotion.

I highly recommend doing a Sacred Heart of Jesus chaplet, rather than the DM. I have my own that I came up with based off of the other versions of the Sacred Heart chaplet, but here you can find one with indulgenced prayers: https://www.virgosacrata.com/indulgenced-chaplet-sacred-heart.html

Just curious, why do you think the Divine Mercy is potentially demonic?  Is it because it is a post Fatima and post VII devotion?  As Jovan said, it is heavily influenced by older prayers.

Maybe it’s the plenary indulgence?  That indulgence is hard to obtain.  I don’t think I’m going to change your mind, especially since if I were a betting woman I’d say you also don’t care for the FSSP, but you might want to read this post by Fr. David Nix: https://padreperegrino.org/2019/04/div-mercy/

As an aside, I do have devotion to the Sacred Heart as well.


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - Augustinian - 11-15-2020

(11-15-2020, 12:27 PM)Pandora Wrote:
(11-15-2020, 10:08 AM)Augustinian Wrote: This is much preferred to the spurious (potentially demonic) Divine Mercy devotion.

I highly recommend doing a Sacred Heart of Jesus chaplet, rather than the DM. I have my own that I came up with based off of the other versions of the Sacred Heart chaplet, but here you can find one with indulgenced prayers: https://www.virgosacrata.com/indulgenced-chaplet-sacred-heart.html

Just curious, why do you think the Divine Mercy is potentially demonic?  Is it because it is a post Fatima and post VII devotion?  As Jovan said, it is heavily influenced by older prayers.

Maybe it’s the plenary indulgence?  That indulgence is hard to obtain.  I don’t think I’m going to change your mind, especially since if I were a betting woman I’d say you also don’t care for the FSSP, but you might want to read this post by Fr. David Nix: https://padreperegrino.org/2019/04/div-mercy/

As an aside, I do have devotion to the Sacred Heart as well.

It has much to do with the foundations of the devotion, rather than how it was propagated. For example, within the first few entries of Sr. Faustina's diary, we see her enter the convent by the urgings of these supposed "visions" by disobeying her parents. Her parents forbade her to enter a convent, and rather than obey them (she was yet under their charge, mind you), she ran away and joined any way. So from the outset we have a religious life established upon disobedience of one's parents, a mortal sin. And this is claimed to have come from God, who does not permit mortal sin for the cause of good. That is not at all a godly start to a pious devotion.

For comparison's sake, many like to point out how similar the life of St. Margaret Mary is to that of Sr. Faustina. Yet, when St. Margaret was called to the religious life she by no means did so against the will of those who had charge over her. Her mother did not wish her to enter a convent, and as painful as it was for St. Margaret, she obeyed. After her mother died, and with the blessing of her brother, only then was St. Margaret able to enter the religious life after about 3 years.

As for the prayers themselves, I myself have admitted many times that the prayers of the chaplet themselves are good, solid, and pious prayers. The problem here is that they appear to be derived from a separate devotion to the Holy Wounds, and further, the DM itself is merely a watered-down derivation of the Sacred Heart, so it not only has spurious origins but is also redundant in the face of such a popular and powerful, previously established devotion. If there's one thing to note, anecdotally, is that Our Lady called for devotion to her Immaculate Heart and the Sacred Heart at Fatima. She mentioned nothing of a later devotion, as the Sacred Heart already encompasses that which the DM attempts to expand. And further, the Sacred Heart, since the popular propagation of the DM, has been almost completely eclipsed.

So, while I can't tell you which devotions to practice, all I can say is that there are too many questionable elements behind the DM devotion to even recommend practicing it.

Edit: Before I am met with contrarianism regarding my claims above, here is the excerpt I am referring to from the Diary of Sr. Faustina:
Quote:"At eighteen I begged my parents to allow me to enter a convent; but they firmly refused. After that refusal I indulged in the vanity of life, not paying any attention to the voice of grace, although there was nothing in which my soul could find contentment. [4] The continual calling of grace was a great torment for me, nonetheless I tried to stifle my calling with various entertainments. Inwardly, I avoided God and turned my entire soul to creatures. However, God's grace won in my soul." -Notebook I, sec. 8.
[...]
"Then I heard these words, "Go immediately to Warsaw, there you will enter a convent." I rose from prayer, came home and settled the things that were necessary. I confided to my sister, as best I could, what had happened in my soul, and told her to say good-bye for me to our parents, and so, with just the one dress and nothing [else] I set off for Warsaw." -Notebook I, sec. 10.
https://www.faustyna.pl/en/Dzienniczek/Diary.php?token=1605459659nh3fBG5S65Ofx97gb#p=41


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - Pandora - 11-15-2020

(11-15-2020, 12:52 PM)Augustinian Wrote:
(11-15-2020, 12:27 PM)Pandora Wrote:
(11-15-2020, 10:08 AM)Augustinian Wrote: This is much preferred to the spurious (potentially demonic) Divine Mercy devotion.

I highly recommend doing a Sacred Heart of Jesus chaplet, rather than the DM. I have my own that I came up with based off of the other versions of the Sacred Heart chaplet, but here you can find one with indulgenced prayers: https://www.virgosacrata.com/indulgenced-chaplet-sacred-heart.html

Just curious, why do you think the Divine Mercy is potentially demonic?  Is it because it is a post Fatima and post VII devotion?  As Jovan said, it is heavily influenced by older prayers.

Maybe it’s the plenary indulgence?  That indulgence is hard to obtain.  I don’t think I’m going to change your mind, especially since if I were a betting woman I’d say you also don’t care for the FSSP, but you might want to read this post by Fr. David Nix: https://padreperegrino.org/2019/04/div-mercy/

As an aside, I do have devotion to the Sacred Heart as well.

It has much to do with the foundations of the devotion, rather than how it was propagated. For example, within the first few entries of Sr. Faustina's diary, we see her enter the convent by the urgings of these supposed "visions" by disobeying her parents. Her parents forbade her to enter a convent, and rather than obey them (she was yet under their charge, mind you), she ran away and joined any way. So from the outset we have a religious life established upon disobedience of one's parents, a mortal sin. And this is claimed to have come from God, who does not permit mortal sin for the cause of good. That is not at all a godly start to a pious devotion.

For comparison's sake, many like to point out how similar the life of St. Margaret Mary is to that of Sr. Faustina. Yet, when St. Margaret was called to the religious life she by no means did so against the will of those who had charge over her. Her mother did not wish her to enter a convent, and as painful as it was for St. Margaret, she obeyed. After her mother died, and with the blessing of her brother, only then was St. Margaret able to enter the religious life after about 3 years.

As for the prayers themselves, I myself have admitted many times that the prayers of the chaplet themselves are good, solid, and pious prayers. The problem here is that they appear to be derived from a separate devotion to the Holy Wounds, and further, the DM itself is merely a watered-down derivation of the Sacred Heart, so it not only has spurious origins but is also redundant in the face of such a popular and powerful, previously established devotion. If there's one thing to note, anecdotally, is that Our Lady called for devotion to her Immaculate Heart and the Sacred Heart at Fatima. She mentioned nothing of a later devotion, as the Sacred Heart already encompasses that which the DM attempts to expand. And further, the Sacred Heart, since the popular propagation of the DM, has been almost completely eclipsed.

So, while I can't tell you which devotions to practice, all I can say is that there are too many questionable elements behind the DM devotion to even recommend practicing it.

I see you also do not accept Sr. Faustina is a Saint.  In light of where this is going, at this point we’ll just have to agree to disagree.

I would like to mention she was a peasant and not well educated, and moreover that the earlier translations of her diary from Polish to Italian were not done well.  I believe this is where the controversy began.


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - VoxClamantis - 11-15-2020

At the age of eighteen, Faustina was a grown woman and could make her own decisions about entering monastic life.


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - Florus - 11-15-2020

(11-15-2020, 12:52 PM)Augustinian Wrote: It has much to do with the foundations of the devotion, rather than how it was propagated. For example, within the first few entries of Sr. Faustina's diary, we see her enter the convent by the urgings of these supposed "visions" by disobeying her parents. Her parents forbade her to enter a convent, and rather than obey them (she was yet under their charge, mind you), she ran away and joined any way. So from the outset we have a religious life established upon disobedience of one's parents, a mortal sin. And this is claimed to have come from God, who does not permit mortal sin for the cause of good. That is not at all a godly start to a pious devotion.

For comparison's sake, many like to point out how similar the life of St. Margaret Mary is to that of Sr. Faustina. Yet, when St. Margaret was called to the religious life she by no means did so against the will of those who had charge over her. Her mother did not wish her to enter a convent, and as painful as it was for St. Margaret, she obeyed. After her mother died, and with the blessing of her brother, only then was St. Margaret able to enter the religious life after about 3 years.

I'm not a fan of The Divine Mercy Devotion but a quick look into St. Thomas seems to say the opposite:

"If, however, the parents' necessity be not such as to stand in great need of their children's assistance, the latter may, in despite of the duty they owe their parents, enter religion even against their parents' command, because after the age of puberty every freeman enjoys freedom in things concerning the ordering of his state of life, especially in such as belong to the service of God, and "we should more obey the Father of spirits that we may live ['Shall we not much more obey the Father of Spirits, and live?']," as says the Apostle (Hebrews 12:9), than obey our parents." Hence as we read (Matthew 8:22Luke 9:62our Lord rebuked the disciple who was unwilling to follow him forthwith on account of his father's burial: for there were others who could see to this, as Chrysostom remarks [Hom. xxvii in Matth.].

So unless her parents couldn't take care of themselves without her I don't think that would be a mortal sin.



RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - Augustinian - 11-15-2020

(11-15-2020, 01:23 PM)VoxClamantis Wrote: At the age of eighteen, Faustina was a grown woman and could make her own decisions about entering monastic life.

I overlooked that detail, thank you. My criticisms outside of this particular excerpt still stand, though.


RE: Divine Mercy Chaplet - MagisterMusicae - 11-15-2020

In the 1917 Code, Canon 88 and 89 define a person who is under 21 as a minor and subject to their parents' except where Canon Law exempts them.

The Code envisions that someone who is as young as 15 could enter religion, but only with permission of his or her parents. At least from 1917 onward, only after reaching the age of 21, or before with parental permission (unless the person's bishop or the Pope made some exception), one could not validly enter the novitiate. Certainly unless there were a grave issue, someone who was still a minor could not run away from home and enter religion without some sin involved.

It is of note that St Thérèse, who at age 14 wanted to enter the Carmel, supported by her parents, was denied, and when she asked again at age 15, with parental permission was again refused. She went to Rome specifically to ask Leo XIII to allow it. His reply was that she should do as the superiors wanted, and that would be God's sign. The local bishop gave the dispensation (not influenced by the Pope's statement).

So the law for religious at Sr Faustina's time required her to be 21 to enter without her parents' permission, or a dispensation for serious reasons.

Her own description says that after going to a dance at age 19, she felt ashamed at the event and ran away to the Cathedral to pray. There she perceived Our Lord to tell her to run away from home, go to Warsaw, and enter the convent against her parents' wishes. She tried but no convent would receive her except one that said she needed a dowry, so instead of returning home, she took up work in the city to save up the money, and when she had it, she was permitted to make her profession (seemingly without a postulancy, which is canonically required for valid profession) at age 20, without parental permission, and seemingly without dispensation.

Perhaps there are other details here, but it sure seems like what was done did not agree with Canon Law, and certainly that there was not a sufficient motive at age 19 to leave home, when Canon Law established 21 as the age when one could act fully as an adult without parental guidance.

I will only say that it does seem that there were errors made, and the law not properly followed, all because of a personal perception that Our Lord had spoken to someone and they were to enter religion. That at least seems suspicious, and under the former process for Canonization, would certainly have disqualified a candidate. Again, perhaps I am missing details of the story, but it seems Augustinian has a valid point from a Canonical perspective.