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Priest Points To Generational Spirits - Zedta - 11-25-2020

Interesting article here. It is about a subject that I have begun studying recently due to some personal issues I was exploring. The article is a good one and worth the short few minutes it may take one to read, and, it may strike a chord with you as well.


Article Wrote:Link to Original Blog Post

Priest Points To Generational Spirits



We've long been interested in the testimony of priests concerning what they call "generational healing." That's when spiritual burdens from the past -- from ancestors -- are allegedly lifted. Holidays are a great time to pray for our families.

We say "allegedly" because while this practice is growing, is accepted by many priests, and appears to conflict with no strictures of the Church, it still raises questions among some Christians. It is a fascinating concept: that like Scripture says (Exodus 34:7) -- and as we know from Adam and Eve -- sins of the fathers can be passed down through the generations.

Could this really be? Might spiritual matters be inherited — passed down like genes?

In the past, we’ve spoken to experts such as Father John Hampsch of California (who recently died at 94; his book shows the biblical basis) and Father Robert DeGrandis of Washington, D.C. (also now deceased). A while ago, we called another, Father Lou Cerulli of Montreal, who explained that there are just too many cases where recurring problems — divorce, alcoholism, financial problems, accidents — run in families. When a person dies, he believes, spirits that caused such problems or spiritual proclivities are passed on to the descendants.

“All of us are affected at least to some degree,” says Father Cerulli. “Some people are more affected than others. Some people have no problems until they are 40 or 50. There are always degrees. But if you’re going back to all the generations, there is going to be something. Whether we’re aware of it or not is another question.”

According to Father Cerulli (who travels extensively giving healing Masses), burdens from the past seem to especially manifest through disorders that are psychological or emotional. To dispel them Father Cerulli focuses on the Eucharist, asking those who seek his help to fill out a “genogram (basically, a family tree with the names of ancestors) and reciting prayers designed to alleviate such problems. During Mass the priest tells those seeking his counsel to continue writing down any facts, thoughts, or memories about deceased relatives. He speaks especially about the effects of past occult involvement. After the gifts are brought up, Father Cerulli says he recites another prayer to break generational curses.

“Then they bring up the family trees and they are placed in a basket that I raise up to the Lord for His healing,” explains Father Cerulli. “The Eucharist is celebrated and afterward the genograms are sealed in envelopes that are never opened and given to a community of nuns in Montreal who pray over them for three months, later disposing of them by burning them.”

All kinds of problems dissolve. There are physical healings. There is deliverance from disorders like anorexia, bulimia, and even suicidal tendencies. Usually it’s the relief from a general malaise that has haunted folks for decades.

“Invariably, there will be people who come up and say they had been carrying a burden — abortion, miscarriages, infant death — and afterward you can see the release on their faces,” claims Father Cerulli.  “Such peace and joy! Often, there is reconciliation. We have cases where there’s been an estrangement and people haven’t heard from family members for maybe 20 years or more, and all of a sudden there’s a knock on the door or a letter in the mail or a phone call. I remember an instance where a lady was even unaware that she had a sibling and after a weekend retreat, she came into contact with this sibling. Sometimes this is within days or weeks of a celebration of the Eucharist for the family tree.”

Now in his seventies, Father Cerulli was a late vocation who was ordained in 1991 and was inspired to start his ministry by an English psychiatrist named Dr. Kenneth McCall who wrote extraordinary, groundbreaking books on generational healing (at some point in the future, we’ll explore the life of this incredible psychiatrist). Father Cerulli usually gives a monthly healing Mass in Montreal, and will soon be pastor of St. Ignatius Loyola in that Canadian city.

What advice does he give to families who feel they are “haunted” — that there is something negative hovering around their lineage?

If they can’t get to a healing Mass, he advises, they should meet as a family and discuss the issue. “One thing I suggest they do is put their thoughts on paper and develop a genogram as a tool, not as a science, but to become as specific as we can in praying for our families,” says the priest. “If possible, get together and look at the family tree. Sit down, have a nice meal together, share your stories, bring your photographs, and put it down on paper. Try to be as specific as possible. Put down names if you can. If you don’t know the name of your great-great grandfather, then just put down ‘GGF.’ After you’ve had your discussion and made your notes, pray. Pray for the healing of your family tree.”

Father Cerulli believes there are spiritual aspects particular to various lineages. For example, Italians often confront occult spirits passed down from ancient paganism or from practices such as witchcraft, the Black Hand, or the “evil eye.” There is also much occultism in Latin cultures, notes the priest — who worked in the financial industry and designed training programs for major corporations before responding to the priestly call.

But really, says Father Cerulli, no ethnicity can be singled out. Every culture has its spiritual problems. Unhealthy practices “open up doors to the family line that never should have been opened,” and one striking example, he believes, may be the ancient and seemingly intractable Jewish-Arab division. He believes if it may go back to the fact that Abraham had two sons — one by his lawful wife, Sarah, the other by their Egyptian servant, Hagar.

The son by Sarah was Isaac, and his descendants were to inherit Canaan. The son born of Hagar was named Ishmael and may have been a patron of Arabs.
“His hand will be against everyone, and everyone’s hand will be against him; And he will live to the east of all his brothers,” notes Genesis 16.
“These two guys and these two nations have been at each other ever since,” notes Father Cerulli.

“Ultimately, we all have problems. We’re all connected. We may be different people and different cultures and different languages, but if you go right back we come from God and are all one, are all connected.”



RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - ActusFidei313 - 11-25-2020

(11-25-2020, 12:06 PM)Zedta Wrote: Interesting article here. It is about a subject that I have begun studying recently due to some personal issues I was exploring. The article is a good one and worth the short few minutes it may take one to read, and, it may strike a chord with you as well.


Article Wrote:Link to Original Blog Post

Priest Points To Generational Spirits



We've long been interested in the testimony of priests concerning what they call "generational healing." That's when spiritual burdens from the past -- from ancestors -- are allegedly lifted. Holidays are a great time to pray for our families.

We say "allegedly" because while this practice is growing, is accepted by many priests, and appears to conflict with no strictures of the Church, it still raises questions among some Christians. It is a fascinating concept: that like Scripture says (Exodus 34:7) -- and as we know from Adam and Eve -- sins of the fathers can be passed down through the generations.

Could this really be? Might spiritual matters be inherited — passed down like genes?

In the past, we’ve spoken to experts such as Father John Hampsch of California (who recently died at 94; his book shows the biblical basis) and Father Robert DeGrandis of Washington, D.C. (also now deceased). A while ago, we called another, Father Lou Cerulli of Montreal, who explained that there are just too many cases where recurring problems — divorce, alcoholism, financial problems, accidents — run in families. When a person dies, he believes, spirits that caused such problems or spiritual proclivities are passed on to the descendants.

“All of us are affected at least to some degree,” says Father Cerulli. “Some people are more affected than others. Some people have no problems until they are 40 or 50. There are always degrees. But if you’re going back to all the generations, there is going to be something. Whether we’re aware of it or not is another question.”

According to Father Cerulli (who travels extensively giving healing Masses), burdens from the past seem to especially manifest through disorders that are psychological or emotional. To dispel them Father Cerulli focuses on the Eucharist, asking those who seek his help to fill out a “genogram (basically, a family tree with the names of ancestors) and reciting prayers designed to alleviate such problems. During Mass the priest tells those seeking his counsel to continue writing down any facts, thoughts, or memories about deceased relatives. He speaks especially about the effects of past occult involvement. After the gifts are brought up, Father Cerulli says he recites another prayer to break generational curses.

“Then they bring up the family trees and they are placed in a basket that I raise up to the Lord for His healing,” explains Father Cerulli. “The Eucharist is celebrated and afterward the genograms are sealed in envelopes that are never opened and given to a community of nuns in Montreal who pray over them for three months, later disposing of them by burning them.”

All kinds of problems dissolve. There are physical healings. There is deliverance from disorders like anorexia, bulimia, and even suicidal tendencies. Usually it’s the relief from a general malaise that has haunted folks for decades.

“Invariably, there will be people who come up and say they had been carrying a burden — abortion, miscarriages, infant death — and afterward you can see the release on their faces,” claims Father Cerulli.  “Such peace and joy! Often, there is reconciliation. We have cases where there’s been an estrangement and people haven’t heard from family members for maybe 20 years or more, and all of a sudden there’s a knock on the door or a letter in the mail or a phone call. I remember an instance where a lady was even unaware that she had a sibling and after a weekend retreat, she came into contact with this sibling. Sometimes this is within days or weeks of a celebration of the Eucharist for the family tree.”

Now in his seventies, Father Cerulli was a late vocation who was ordained in 1991 and was inspired to start his ministry by an English psychiatrist named Dr. Kenneth McCall who wrote extraordinary, groundbreaking books on generational healing (at some point in the future, we’ll explore the life of this incredible psychiatrist). Father Cerulli usually gives a monthly healing Mass in Montreal, and will soon be pastor of St. Ignatius Loyola in that Canadian city.

What advice does he give to families who feel they are “haunted” — that there is something negative hovering around their lineage?

If they can’t get to a healing Mass, he advises, they should meet as a family and discuss the issue. “One thing I suggest they do is put their thoughts on paper and develop a genogram as a tool, not as a science, but to become as specific as we can in praying for our families,” says the priest. “If possible, get together and look at the family tree. Sit down, have a nice meal together, share your stories, bring your photographs, and put it down on paper. Try to be as specific as possible. Put down names if you can. If you don’t know the name of your great-great grandfather, then just put down ‘GGF.’ After you’ve had your discussion and made your notes, pray. Pray for the healing of your family tree.”

Father Cerulli believes there are spiritual aspects particular to various lineages. For example, Italians often confront occult spirits passed down from ancient paganism or from practices such as witchcraft, the Black Hand, or the “evil eye.” There is also much occultism in Latin cultures, notes the priest — who worked in the financial industry and designed training programs for major corporations before responding to the priestly call.

But really, says Father Cerulli, no ethnicity can be singled out. Every culture has its spiritual problems. Unhealthy practices “open up doors to the family line that never should have been opened,” and one striking example, he believes, may be the ancient and seemingly intractable Jewish-Arab division. He believes if it may go back to the fact that Abraham had two sons — one by his lawful wife, Sarah, the other by their Egyptian servant, Hagar.

The son by Sarah was Isaac, and his descendants were to inherit Canaan. The son born of Hagar was named Ishmael and may have been a patron of Arabs.
“His hand will be against everyone, and everyone’s hand will be against him; And he will live to the east of all his brothers,” notes Genesis 16.
“These two guys and these two nations have been at each other ever since,” notes Father Cerulli.

“Ultimately, we all have problems. We’re all connected. We may be different people and different cultures and different languages, but if you go right back we come from God and are all one, are all connected.”

Does he talk about what to do for folks who are adopted?  Or do they fall under the adoptive family (which does make sense)?

Pax


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - Coti Tog - 12-01-2020

I found this article very interesting, as my family history seems to be one of abuse, trauma, and tragedy. I have often wondered about what some Protestants call a "generational curse."
I've wondered whether such a concept exists within Catholicism and what to do about it. I plan to take a look at the author's book.


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - HailGilbert - 12-02-2020

Fr. Chad Ripperger, a great teacher among us Trads, did a three-part series on generational spirits, what they do and have done with our lives and families and how to get rid of them.

Part One is here:

Part Two is here:

Part Three is here:

Please listen to his teaching. I think and believe it will be helpful to you. Thank you in advance.


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - MagisterMusicae - 12-02-2020

Worrying about some demon haunting your family and causing all kinds of problem is silly if :

1. The explanation is natural,

2. We are not firstly doing our basic duty of state and working on our normal spiritual lives.

Working as a teacher and counselor, I get to see plenty of problem cases in families. Having done theology, philosophy and psychology at seminary before leaving, while I am no expert, I can honestly say that the vast majority of problems in families that are "generational" are simply because of past generations acting badly, sinning and refusing to try to live good Catholic lives.

Grandad decides to drink because instead of dealing with his problems, he prefers numbing the pain and becomes an alcoholic, he beats his sons when they do the slightest wrong. The sons grown up and one has children, and he, knowing how horrible he had it, lets his sons and daughter do as they please and refuses to correct them, and then when there are problems, he too turns to the bottle, and then lashes out, and so the sons and daughters who have become libertines through lack of correction and love themselves have children out of wedlock and lots of problems.

The knock-on effect of sin doesn't require devils to explain, and I worry that "generational spirits" (which have absolutely no basis in Catholic Theology, despite what Fr Ripperger tries to claim) are just an excuse to absolve our families of their own sins without repentance for those sins. Just blame the devil, and say these "binding prayers" (which are not approved).

If a solution seems new, it is probably not Catholic. If a solution seems too simple, it also is probably not Catholic or correct.

Now, even if I'm totally wrong on all of that, if one reads any classic Spiritual author or any Ascetic and Mystical Theology manual, one finds that the first and most important thing to do to avoid the influence of evil are the basic duties of state. Pray the Rosary every day, frequent Mass attendance, frequent Communions, frequent Confessions, spiritual reading, spiritual direction, penances, etc. None suggest self-help style Catholicism, by which we just look up some esoteric topic, listen to an internet video, read a forum post and then start a whole new practice which is unfamiliar to traditional Catholic practice.

So, take my opinion on "generational spirits" for what it's worth (knowing that many traditional priests are fully opposed to it—SSPX priests I know have preached against it as a Protestant idea).

Nevertheless, if one is tempted to blame some family issues on just such a obsession, then perhaps start by getting one's spiritual and moral life under control and then consulting a priest as a spiritual director to figure out what penances are a good idea and how to change our actions to align them more with Catholic principles.


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - jovan66102 - 12-02-2020

(12-02-2020, 03:24 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: "generational spirits" (which have absolutely no basis in Catholic Theology, despite what Fr Ripperger tries to claim) 

Apropos of this, I have not attended seminary, but I have been reading traditional Catholic theology for over 40 years. Until the last few years I had never heard 'generational spirits' so much as mentioned.

In fact, I belong to a Traditionalist Facebook group where recently one of the moderators created a poll. It asked 1) if you had ever heard of generational spirits, 2) if you had when did you first hear about them, and if you had, how did you first learn about them?

Many people indicated they had never heard of them, and many members of the group are long term Trads whose parents resisted the changes back when they first happened.

Of those who had heard of them, without exception, all had first run across them in the last five years or less. And, almost without exception, they had all heard of them from Fr Ripperger, from his books, or from someone who had watched one of his videos or read one of his books.



RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - MagisterMusicae - 12-02-2020

I really don't mean to bash the idea if it is Catholic.

Please understand this. 

In fact, if it is correct, then we need to look at this and pay more attention, but :

  • Most of the material dealing with these "generational spirits" come from Protestant sources.
  • The best arguments from Catholics I have heard for the existence of "generational spirits" are based on the text of blessings such as the nuptial blessing, which mention the following generations. Then the argument misrepresents the blessings as carrying on to future generations (which is not what these prayers ask or suggest), and then suggests that if a blessing can carry on for generations, so can a curse, and so a demon can attach themselves through generations as a result of certain sins.
  • Many of the problems described as coming from "generational spirits" and passing to future are easily explained by the evil behavior and its influence itself, and the knock-on effects. Alcoholics often have genetic predispositions, and their disfunction creates chaos in their children's lives, which tends to cause alcoholism and other problems. Out-of-wedlock children tend to be raised in an environment that encourages the same behavior in them. 
  • This theory of "generational spirits" seems to undermine the efficacy of the traditional rite of Baptism and its multiple exorcisms, while at the same time suggesting that some "binding prayers" said by non-exorcists are more efficacious than the exorcisms given by a priest in the context of a Sacrament that remits all sin.
  • While Ex 20.5, and 34.6-7 do speak of God punishing iniquity for generations, the same Pentateuch (Deut 24.16) very clearly says : "The son will not bear the punishment for the father’s iniquity," and Our Lord corrects the Apostles who think the blind man was blind due to his parents' sins (Jn 9.1-3). Further, all of Ezechiel's 18th chapter suggests that God does not punish a Just man for the evil his son does, nor a Just man for the evils of his father.
So, all of that taken together, and the relative newness of the whole idea of "generational healing" which seems to come out of Evangelical Protestantism, I don't feel very comfortable with it, and have never found a single traditional source suggesting it was ever believed or practiced by Catholics before the 1970s.

I would very much be happy to reconsider if it could be shown that it was a traditional practice/doctrine or even a pious belief. I would be very happy to find a reference to a traditional theology manual, or spiritual author who directly references (even by another term) this idea, and the remedy of "binding prayers".

If anyone has such reference, please let me know of them, and I will try to do further research.


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - LionHippo - 12-03-2020

I have had one younger traditional priest mention generational spirits in confession once, but he probably learned of it from Fr. Ripperger.

We already have original sin and concupiscence handed down to us through our first parents. "Generational sin" may be a more appropriate term than "spirits," as human influence and behavior is overwhelmingly the more likely cause of sinful behavior.

There is a certain danger, I think, in seeking to blame the demonic for all sins. This way of thinking can lead one to avoid admitting culpability for the sins they commit, and instead blame them for things not under their control. Or, one's faith life can become preoccupied with merely fighting against temptation and vice, without striving to practice the higher virtues. In other words, their mere avoidance of sin can become the benchmark of their prayer life, while taking no time to perfect charity.


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - Justin Tertius - 12-03-2020

Not to make this a thread against Father Ripperger, but I would generally counsel Catholics to avoid his sermons. 

Not that the majority of what he says is wrong. Quite the contrary, he has many orthodox things to say. But I think that he has some pet ideas that he over-emphasizes and this can create a serious lack of balance in one's spiritual life. The idea of generational spirits is one of those ideas.

90% of anyone's problems, spiritual, emotional or physical, are not demonic. Those problems are our own fault and the solutions for them are going to be arduous and difficult. 

I think there is something about the subject matter which we are naturally inclined toward. Things that are dark and esoteric are going to be attractive to the curious.


RE: Priest Points To Generational Spirits - Catholic Smurf - 12-03-2020

MagisterMusicae pretty much nailed it on the head.

My biggest worry with these things is that people will think they’re magical bullets that will solve all of their problems. Say you have a young man who’s an alcoholic. His father was too. And his father. And his father. “Exercising the family demons” isn’t going to undo the trauma that the man experienced that actually turned him to the bottle in the first place.

There’s no mass generational demonic phenomenon inflecting the African-American community of the midwest: there’s a simple history of migration from the south into strong industries that all eventually either went under or were sold to international corporations, leaving a generation of men unemployed and in poverty, with all of the horridness that follows from that, their children being raised in that environment, in turn raising their children in an even worse environment, and so on.

Sure if you want you can take a walk through Detroit exercising these generational spirits. You could also work and campaign to bring business and industry back to the city. I think one would prove more effective than the other.