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RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - SeekerofChrist - 04-14-2021

(04-14-2021, 04:57 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(04-14-2021, 11:26 AM)SeekerofChrist Wrote: Any chance there's an English version of the synaxarion?  It'd be interesting to examine, not merely to confirm the canonization of a particular saint but perhaps in its own right.

Not a full synaxarion, but here is a pdf of the Calendar of Saints observed by the UGCC.

http://archeparchy.ca/wcm-docs/docs/Church_Calendar.pdf

Thank you, Jovan.  Looks like Constantine shares a feast day (May 21) with his mother.  I'm assuming the "Holy" in front of the person's name is an Eastern way of saying "Saint," correct?  If so, the UGCC has him on their list of saints.  That's good enough for me (as far as calling him "St. Constantine," since I'm sure this canonization occurred pre-schism, under the pre-schism form for canonization.


RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - jovan66102 - 04-14-2021

(04-14-2021, 05:14 PM)SeekerofChrist Wrote:  I'm assuming the "Holy" in front of the person's name is an Eastern way of saying "Saint," correct?  

Yes. Depending on the Church, the titles may vary. For instance, the UGCC Calendar I shared uses 'Priest-Martyr' for (obviously! LOL!) a Priest Martyr, whereas many Churches use the Greek term 'Hieromartyr'. Saints like Constantine and Volodomir the Great, who were instrumental in converting whole peoples, are sometimes called 'Equal to the Apostles' or Enlightener of Nations'


RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - newenglandsun - 04-14-2021

(04-14-2021, 11:17 AM)ChairmanJoeAintMyPresident Wrote:
(04-14-2021, 11:16 AM)Augustinian Wrote: I've noticed that there's post-schism saints venerated by Eastern Catholics such as St. Gregory Palamas that aren't recognized by the West.

We ought to consider these to be questionable because their canonizations could not have been infallible.
Many Eastern Catholics were in union with those saints prior to coming to Rome. The issue is complex. St. Nectarios of Aegina is canonized in the Latin Church though...🤷 

That said, any one prior to the schism should be acceptable to venerate. But only if the acceptance is by the consensus patrium. The Copts venerate Pontius Pilate as a saint. That one's iffy and the consensus patrium would not lend credence to that position.

On the schism, there is actually recent scholarly dispute as to when exactly it took effect. Though commonly held to have occurred in 1054 AD, Met. Kallistos Ware has raised skepticism as there were joint services between Greeks and Crusaders long after until the fall of Constantinople.


RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - SeekerofChrist - 04-14-2021

(04-14-2021, 06:11 PM)newenglandsun Wrote:
(04-14-2021, 11:17 AM)ChairmanJoeAintMyPresident Wrote:
(04-14-2021, 11:16 AM)Augustinian Wrote: I've noticed that there's post-schism saints venerated by Eastern Catholics such as St. Gregory Palamas that aren't recognized by the West.

We ought to consider these to be questionable because their canonizations could not have been infallible

That said, any one prior to the schism should be acceptable to venerate. But only if the acceptance is by the consensus patrium. The Copts venerate Pontius Pilate as a saint. That one's iffy and the consensus patrium would not lend credence to that position.

It is interesting that you mention Coptic veneration of Pontius Pilate.  As I was looking into the subject of Eastern saints yesterday, I ran across several articles that mention his canonization among the Coptic and Ethiopian Orthodox.  I found it interesting.  If true (obviously, I can't say), it'd be one of the most powerful conversion stories in history.  I do hear that his wife, Claudia Procula, has wider veneration in the East.  I also learned that there are several apocryphal acts that detail the alleged conversion, though they date hundreds of years after their lifetimes.  Interesting subject.


RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - xsantiagox - 04-14-2021

can someone confirm of Tekle Haymanot is approved as a saint by catholic? he's an ethiopian saint, he stood upright in a cave for like a decade akin to symeon stylite.
wikipedia says he's venerated in catholic and orthodox churches,but id like a more learned opinion.


RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - newenglandsun - 04-14-2021

(04-14-2021, 06:37 PM)xsantiagox Wrote: can someone confirm of Tekle Haymanot is approved as a saint by catholic? he's an ethiopian saint, he stood upright in a cave for like a decade akin to symeon stylite.
wikipedia says he's venerated in catholic and orthodox churches,but id like a more learned opinion.
Similar to the Uniate Churches of the Rite of Constantinople, the Oriental Catholics have retained veneration. When it comes to Oriental Orthodox saints, one of the key things to take account of is whether they held to monophysite heresies in their theology. Aidan Nichols mentions this as a challenge to unification with Rome and the Orientals in Rome and the Eastern Churches.

For instance, Evagrius Ponticus, though his moral theology is greatly influential in the East, was condemned for monophysitism. He is venerated and canonized in the Oriental Orthodox churches but the Oriental Catholics do not venerate him as a saint as they acknowledge the Council that condemned him.

*I stand corrected, Evagrius was condemned not for Monophysitism but for Origenism.


RE: Eastern Saints and Eastern Catholics - jovan66102 - 04-15-2021

(04-14-2021, 05:14 PM)SeekerofChrist Wrote: That's good enough for me (as far as calling him "St. Constantine," since I'm sure this canonization occurred pre-schism, under the pre-schism form for canonization.

Yeah. If you can't call him a Saint, you shouldn't call ANY Saint prior to about the middle of the 12th century 'Saint', which wipes out a lot of beloved Saints like St Patrick and St Brigid.