German Schools Abolish Christian Festival to Avoid Offending Muslim Migrants
#1


From The European Union Times:




German Schools Abolish Christian Festival to Avoid Offending Muslim Migrants
Posted by EU Times on Nov 2nd, 2015


Primary schools and kindergartens in Germany are abolishing a Christian celebration and changing it into a generic “festival of lights” so as not to offend the hundreds of thousands of Muslim migrants pouring into the country.

According to a translated report out of the Epoch Times, schools are re-naming the Christian-themed St. Martin’s Day, an annual celebration that takes place in numerous European countries on November 11.

Several daycare centers in Düsseldorf have abolished the festival altogether out of “consideration for the refugees,” a decision that has prompted fierce criticism from head teachers at other schools in the region.

Others have re-named the event the “Festival of Lights” in order to “facilitate the integration” of the Muslim migrants, said Nanette Weidelt, head of the Düsseldorf Don Bosco-Montessori School.

Leftist politicians have been attempting to amend the celebration for a number of years, with Rüdiger Sagel insisting the change was a necessary response to the “high proportion of Muslim children in the day care centers.”

“You should not impose the Christian tradition,” Sagel asserted.

However, some see the change as yet another example of how Germans are being forced to integrate with Muslim culture and not the other way around as it should be.

“These migrants are coming to our countries from failed, devastated cultures. When and why was it decided that we have to mute and censor our traditions and mores for theirs — a failed society that suffocates and destroys?” writes Pamela Geller. “They are running from devastation and failure; why adopt that?”

As we have exhaustively documented, this is not the first example of European nations sacrificing aspects of their own culture in order to please the wave of incoming “refugees”.

A Protestant church in Oberhausen, Germany recently announced that it would remove Christian crosses, altars and pulpits in order to accommodate 50 Muslim migrants who were invited to stay in the building.

Back in September, a school in Bavaria also sent a letter to parents asking them to ensure girls didn’t wear shorts or mini-skirts so as to prevent “attacks” from Muslims housed in a nearby gym who might be offended by such attire.

Quote:
Where are those crazy feminists now?

As we reported last month, the world’s first lesbian Bishop Eva Brunne also suggested removing Christian crosses and symbols from a church in Stockholm in order to make the building “more inviting” for Muslims.

Last week, we also highlighted how German security experts are warning that the middle class in Germany is becoming “radicalized” in response to the migrant influx and that domestic unrest may occur as a result.

Quote:Where "radicalized" means "angry at what's going on, inspired to defend their culture so they can pass it down to their own children, defensive of their nations" and so forth. You know, the things Muslims want for their kids -- and are, apparently, able to accomplish in European lands. And that Jews want -- and get -- for their kids in Israel, with no one daring to point out the double standards lest they be called names (ouchies!).
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#2
The 'Christian' element of this died a long time ago. If some people still use the Christian terms in relation, it really is just a 'festival or lights' for everyone, not in response to Muslims, but a natural devolution of their lukewarm faith. My kid was part of he pathetic festivities, and one mother remarked that her son said 'Martin was a good man,' and burst out laughing at the comment, that her kid would show admiration for what she sees as silly mythical figure. I hate this unclear ghost Christianity that lingers and it kicked around like a beggar turned jester. It is the ugliest lukewarmness I've ever seen. It would be nice to pint the finger at the Muslims, but they just arrived on the scene, as far as this is concerned.
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#3
Lest we criticize Europe's lukewarmness too much I should remember that every year I hear stories of manifestation of Christianity in the USA being suppressed so as not to offend the Jews (and more recently now, the Atheists).
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#4
(11-13-2015, 11:42 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: Lest we criticize Europe's lukewarmness too much I should remember that every year I hear stories of manifestation of Christianity in the USA being suppressed so as not to offend the Jews (and more recently now, the Atheists).

I don't know. I mean Protestant Christianity, the majority of the US, isn't very celebratory anyway. Then there's constant disputes between Christians over holidays, as an American you just take it is all with a grain of salt. As silly as they are, holidays like Thanksgiving and Halloween serve a great integration and diplomatic purpose for the US. And if you don't observe, no one cares, you can do your own thing. Here's nothing but empty Christian rituals, except the odd regional thing like Oktoberfest. Jews never made that big of a stink about it, not even when I was in NYC. The Muslims were always much whinier.
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#5
Most Catholics today-- German or otherwise-- probably have no idea who St. Martin of Tours was anyway. I find that it takes a lot of effort to learn about the various saints on the calendar and the customs associated with them. St Martin meant something to a culture that was connected in some way to the wheel of the liturgical year and that still had a peasants simplicity in matters of faith and piety. 

These days when I mention Martinmas even to fairly devout Catholics most shake their head and say " huh". The times they are a changing... I'd bet that if I were to walk to the local parish today and ask either the Nigerian or the Polish priest who St. Martin of Tours is, what day his feast is on and what customs are associated with him neither could answer any of these questions.
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#6
(11-14-2015, 06:01 AM)xandratax Wrote:
(11-13-2015, 11:42 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: Lest we criticize Europe's lukewarmness too much I should remember that every year I hear stories of manifestation of Christianity in the USA being suppressed so as not to offend the Jews (and more recently now, the Atheists).

I don't know. I mean Protestant Christianity, the majority of the US, isn't very celebratory anyway. Then there's constant disputes between Christians over holidays, as an American you just take it is all with a grain of salt. As silly as they are, holidays like Thanksgiving and Halloween serve a great integration and diplomatic purpose for the US. And if you don't observe, no one cares, you can do your own thing. Here's nothing but empty Christian rituals, except the odd regional thing like Oktoberfest. Jews never made that big of a stink about it, not even when I was in NYC. The Muslims were always much whinier.

Wait, isn't Germany a mostly Prot nation?

(11-14-2015, 08:52 AM)formerbuddhist Wrote: Most Catholics today-- German or otherwise-- probably have no idea who St. Martin of Tours was anyway. I find that it takes a lot of effort to learn about the various saints on the calendar and the customs associated with them. St Martin meant something to a culture that was connected in some way to the wheel of the liturgical year and that still had a peasants simplicity in matters of faith and piety. 

These days when I mention Martinmas even to fairly devout Catholics most shake their head and say " huh". The times they are a changing... I'd bet that if I were to walk to the local parish today and ask either the Nigerian or the Polish priest who St. Martin of Tours is, what day his feast is on and what customs are associated with him neither could answer any of these questions.

Its not really that hard if one actually goes to Mass. Sometimes I go to weekdays Mass and the priest briefly talks about the saint of the day. Ironically, this happens more frequently at the only place I go for NOM than in the TLM, which sometimes the priest just skips homily (the SSPX is a completely different thing, they substitute days with no commemoration with other festivities, which I find in such bad taste--this is just putting your will above the Liturgical year).

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#7
(11-14-2015, 09:14 PM)Renatus Frater Wrote:
(11-14-2015, 06:01 AM)xandratax Wrote:
(11-13-2015, 11:42 AM)Renatus Frater Wrote: Lest we criticize Europe's lukewarmness too much I should remember that every year I hear stories of manifestation of Christianity in the USA being suppressed so as not to offend the Jews (and more recently now, the Atheists).

I don't know. I mean Protestant Christianity, the majority of the US, isn't very celebratory anyway. Then there's constant disputes between Christians over holidays, as an American you just take it is all with a grain of salt. As silly as they are, holidays like Thanksgiving and Halloween serve a great integration and diplomatic purpose for the US. And if you don't observe, no one cares, you can do your own thing. Here's nothing but empty Christian rituals, except the odd regional thing like Oktoberfest. Jews never made that big of a stink about it, not even when I was in NYC. The Muslims were always much whinier.

Wait, isn't Germany a mostly Prot nation?

It's half and half, and Austria is all 'Catholic.' The German-speaking peoples have a very bizarre attachment to Catholicism that I've not seen anywhere else. Though they hate the Church or are indifferent to it, they don't want to give it up. From here originates the bizarre 'We are Church' movement, a bunch of lapsed Catholics, who unable to give reasons as to why they don't just become Protestants, wants to turn to Church into a democratized Kumbaya fest, with lay Communion. Indeed, what has happened to things such as the Saint Martin Fest is really an extension of that.
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#8
I'm going to take a wild guess and say they wouldn't prevent a Muslim from saying his or her scheduled prayers or from not eating pork to avoid offending Christian students. We're going to be politically correct as a culture until it drives us into a corner.
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#9
you cant forget where you came from, or pretend not to be something that you are, a tough guy can like kittens for example but he must not be afraid to do the job at hand that he is trained to do, who is one if they dont live up to their name, like one of the priests on ewtn said once, faith is like a boat on faith, too little you end up tipping the boat on way, to much the other fanaticism and unbending, still tips the boat over, or a piece of metal that makes the blade of a sword, too soft it bends in battle, too hard it shatters in first strike, tempering and heat treating takes the brittlness out of the steel and it can cut but not shatter with a hard impact to the sword, what I am trying to say is you can hide who you are but it dont change the fact you are who you are, and who God created you to be, meeting half way is one thing but pretending to be something your not all togather is another wrong thing, I promise you if the shoe was on the other foot they would not change that they prayed when they do, or allowed the eating of pork, or puting up christian symbols in their masjid.  A local coffiehouse owner and Christian man who is a pacifist had a long talk with me when I asked him what he thinks we should do, or rather what what jesus words about carrying the cloak another mile and turning the other cheek ment to him, and how you beat the enemy at his own game, you dont play into his or her hands .
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